Strain Name:

GL/Le Edardl-J +/+ Ostm1gl/J

Stock Number:

000255

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Availability:

Cryopreserved - Ready for recovery

Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Former Names GL/Le Edardl-J +/+ gl    (Changed: 15-DEC-04 )
Type Mutant Strain;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Specieslaboratory mouse

Appearance
Edardl-J: agouti
Related Genotype: A/A ? +/+ ? or A/A Edardl-J + /+ Ostm1gl

Edardl-J: agouti, sparse fur
Related Genotype: A/A ? Edardl-J/+ Edardl-J

Ostm1gl: agouti
Related Genotype: A/A ? +/+ ? or A/A Edardl-J + /+Ostm1gl

Ostm1gl: grey, early lethal
Related Genotype: A/ A Ostm1gl +/Ostm1gl ?

Description
Mice homozygous for the grey-lethal spontaneous mutation (Ostm1gl) are characterized by osteopetrosis. Homozygous mutant mice are anemic, have a reduced white cell count, early thymic involution, and deficient calcium regulation. Homozygotes lack the power of secondary bone resorption. Consequently, the bones cannot grow normally, they do not form normal marrow cavities, and the teeth do not erupt.

Development
Grey-lethal was received by the Jackson Laboratory from Dr. George Jay in 1950. It had been discovered by Dr. H. Gruneberg in 1935 in a stock segregating for Tyrc-e. It arose as a spontaneous mutation. At the Jackson Laboratory it was maintained by mating tested pairs as non-sibling or sibling matings for about 8 generations. It was then crossed to C3HeB for 5 generations using the cross-intercross method. Within-stock tested matings were again used for about 6 generations and then inbreeding by tested sibling matings was used from 1960 to 1967. In 1967 a tested grey-lethal carrier male was mated to a downless Jackson (dl-J) female and the balanced stock was started. Downless Jackson arose in 1964 in a cross of two non-inbred silver stocks. It was tested as an allele of downless at University College London in 1965. The downless Jackson mutation was first outcrossed to C57BL/6J and then sibling mated to F11 and the F11 female was mated to a progeny tested grey-lethal carrier male. The stock was maintained by a balanced cross with grey-lethal and downless Jackson in repulsion since they were very closely linked on Chromosome 10. This strain was cryopreserved in 1987 by mating untested females to known double heterozygous males at generation F64.

Control Information

  Control
   Untyped from the colony
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying   Edardl-J allele
000210   B6C3Fe a/a-Edardl-J/J
View Strains carrying   Edardl-J     (1 strain)

Strains carrying other alleles of Edar
003602   B6 x STOCK Cln6nclf-Edardl-3J/J
View Strains carrying other alleles of Edar     (1 strain)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
- Model with phenotypic similarity to human disease where etiologies involve orthologs. Human genes are associated with this disease. Orthologs of those genes appear in the mouse genotype(s).
Osteopetrosis, Autosomal Recessive 5; OPTB5
- Potential model based on gene homology relationships. Phenotypic similarity to the human disease has not been tested.
Ectodermal Dysplasia 10a, Hypohidrotic/Hair/Nail Type, Autosomal Dominant;   (EDAR)
Ectodermal Dysplasia 10b, Hypohidrotic/Hair/Tooth Type, Autosomal Recessive; ECTD10B   (EDAR)
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Ostm1gl/Ostm1gl

        GL/Le Edardl-J +/+ Ostm1gl/J
  • mortality/aging
  • premature death
    • death occurs between 20 and 30 days of age   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
    • death does not result from starvation, as artificial feeding fails to prolong life significantly   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • pigmentation phenotype
  • abnormal coat/hair pigmentation
    • agouti coat appears grey   (MGI Ref ID J:15551)
  • craniofacial phenotype
  • abnormal dentin morphology
    • there is a very wide layer of uncalcified matter in the dentine and the roots of teeth remain uncalcified   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • abnormal incisor morphology
    • shape and size are abnormal and the back of the lower incisor is found to grow through mental foramen, which becomes very enlarged and forms a protruding bulge from the back end of the incisor   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
    • short incisors
      • homozygotes can be recognized at 18 days of gestation by their short lower incisors which do not extend caudally beneath the first lower molar tooth germs   (MGI Ref ID J:5561)
  • abnormal molar morphology
    • the uncalcified roots become complexly bent and wrinkled in the mandible and tend to leave the maxilla dorsally through the nerve foramina   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
    • abnormal molar crown morphology
      • particularly in the lower first molars, which are more compressed laterally   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • failure of tooth eruption
    • although there are malformed teeth in their sockets, they do not erupt   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • short snout   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • skeleton phenotype
  • abnormal skeleton development   (MGI Ref ID J:5561)
  • failure of bone ossification
    • calcification of the bone is incomplete, wide layers of uncalcified bone cover many of the spongiosa spicules, all spongiosa formed persists, the periosteal bone is poorly developed   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • failure of secondary bone resorption
    • due to the failure of secondary bone resorption, bones cannot grow normally, they do not form normal marrow cavities, and the teeth do not erupt   (MGI Ref ID J:5561)
    • absence of secondary remodelling results in abnormally shaped long limb bones, particularly the proximal end of the humerus and tibia and the distal end of the femur and radius   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • osteopetrosis   (MGI Ref ID J:82658)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • *normal* homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
    • no aberrant bleeding time after tail vein nick   (MGI Ref ID J:29151)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • abnormal dentin morphology
    • there is a very wide layer of uncalcified matter in the dentine and the roots of teeth remain uncalcified   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • abnormal incisor morphology
    • shape and size are abnormal and the back of the lower incisor is found to grow through mental foramen, which becomes very enlarged and forms a protruding bulge from the back end of the incisor   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
    • short incisors
      • homozygotes can be recognized at 18 days of gestation by their short lower incisors which do not extend caudally beneath the first lower molar tooth germs   (MGI Ref ID J:5561)
  • abnormal molar morphology
    • the uncalcified roots become complexly bent and wrinkled in the mandible and tend to leave the maxilla dorsally through the nerve foramina   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
    • abnormal molar crown morphology
      • particularly in the lower first molars, which are more compressed laterally   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • cachexia
    • mutants weigh less than their normal littermates from an early age, continue to be nursed by the mother long after the normal littermates are weaned, and even if sustained with a liquid diet they fail to gain weight and waste away   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • failure of tooth eruption
    • although there are malformed teeth in their sockets, they do not erupt   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • short snout   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • immune system phenotype
  • eye inflammation
    • non-purulent discharge from the eyes makes the eye-lids stick together after they have opened   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • vision/eye phenotype
  • delayed eyelid opening
    • mutants often have the eyelids open slightly later than normal   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • eye inflammation
    • non-purulent discharge from the eyes makes the eye-lids stick together after they have opened   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal gait
    • a pecular gait developes wherein the limbs are stiffly streched so that the belly is far above the floor of the cage   (MGI Ref ID J:13053)
  • integument phenotype
  • abnormal coat/hair pigmentation
    • agouti coat appears grey   (MGI Ref ID J:15551)

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Edardl-J/Edar+

        involves: C3HeB/FeJ
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • abnormal eccrine gland morphology
    • subtle decrease in the number of glands per foot pad   (MGI Ref ID J:193816)
  • integument phenotype
  • abnormal eccrine gland morphology
    • subtle decrease in the number of glands per foot pad   (MGI Ref ID J:193816)
  • limbs/digits/tail phenotype
  • abnormal eccrine gland morphology
    • subtle decrease in the number of glands per foot pad   (MGI Ref ID J:193816)

Edardl-J/Edardl-J

        involves: C3HeB/FeJ
  • integument phenotype
  • abnormal coat/ hair morphology
    • only one type of hair is found resembling an abnormal awl   (MGI Ref ID J:5859)
    • abnormal awl hair morphology
      • septa are irregular in shape and varied in number along the shaft with corresponding irregularities in calbre of the shaft   (MGI Ref ID J:5859)
    • abnormal coat/hair pigmentation   (MGI Ref ID J:5859)
      • darkened coat color
        • the number of hairs with yellow banding is reduced in mice that are homozygous agouti resulting in a darker than expected coat   (MGI Ref ID J:5859)
    • absent auchene hairs   (MGI Ref ID J:5859)
    • absent duvet hair   (MGI Ref ID J:5859)
    • absent guard hair   (MGI Ref ID J:5859)
  • pigmentation phenotype
  • abnormal coat/hair pigmentation   (MGI Ref ID J:5859)
    • darkened coat color
      • the number of hairs with yellow banding is reduced in mice that are homozygous agouti resulting in a darker than expected coat   (MGI Ref ID J:5859)

Edardl-J/Edardl-J

        involves: FVB
  • craniofacial phenotype
  • abnormal circumvallate papillae morphology
    • the embryonic CVP is dysplastic, appearing as a downward fissure rather than a raised dome   (MGI Ref ID J:168036)
  • abnormal enamel knot morphology
    • due to failure of cell condensation, the molars of developing mice have "ropes" of enamel cells extending across the tooth primordium rather than a central signaling center or enamel knot   (MGI Ref ID J:148176)
  • digestive/alimentary phenotype
  • abnormal circumvallate papillae morphology
    • the embryonic CVP is dysplastic, appearing as a downward fissure rather than a raised dome   (MGI Ref ID J:168036)
  • abnormal minor salivary gland morphology
    • histological indications of developing minor salivary glands in E15.5 embryos are absent   (MGI Ref ID J:168036)
    • exogenous Fgf8 and Shh do not fully rescue linguinal gland development in E13.5 tongue explants after 4 days in culture   (MGI Ref ID J:168036)
    • absent anterior lingual gland
      • in adult mutant mice   (MGI Ref ID J:168036)
    • absent palatine gland
      • in adult mutant mice   (MGI Ref ID J:168036)
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • abnormal minor salivary gland morphology
    • histological indications of developing minor salivary glands in E15.5 embryos are absent   (MGI Ref ID J:168036)
    • exogenous Fgf8 and Shh do not fully rescue linguinal gland development in E13.5 tongue explants after 4 days in culture   (MGI Ref ID J:168036)
    • absent anterior lingual gland
      • in adult mutant mice   (MGI Ref ID J:168036)
    • absent palatine gland
      • in adult mutant mice   (MGI Ref ID J:168036)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • abnormal circumvallate papillae morphology
    • the embryonic CVP is dysplastic, appearing as a downward fissure rather than a raised dome   (MGI Ref ID J:168036)
  • abnormal enamel knot morphology
    • due to failure of cell condensation, the molars of developing mice have "ropes" of enamel cells extending across the tooth primordium rather than a central signaling center or enamel knot   (MGI Ref ID J:148176)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Internal/Organ Research
Skeleton
      Bone

Edardl-J related

Dermatology Research
Skin and Hair Texture Defects

Ostm1gl related
Color and White Spotting Defects

Developmental Biology Research
Skeletal Defects
      osteopetrosis

Endocrine Deficiency Research
Bone/Bone Marrow Defects
      osteopetrosis

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
Immunodeficiency Associated with Other Defects

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Edardl-J
Allele Name downless Jackson
Allele Type Spontaneous
Strain of OriginSTOCK Pmelsi
Gene Symbol and Name Edar, ectodysplasin-A receptor
Chromosome 10
Gene Common Name(s) DL; ECTD10A; ECTD10B; ED1R; ED3; ED5; EDA-A1R; EDA1R; EDA3; HRM1; RGD1561714; dl; downless;
General Note Homozygous mutant mice lack hair follicles in the tail, sweat glands in the foot pads, and Meibomian glands in the eyelids. They have only one hair type, which is intermediate between the monotrich and awl types. In conjunction with Tg(YACEdar)949Ove, homozygous mutant mice have normal hair follicles, sweat glands, and Meibomian glands; and they display all four hair types seen in normal mice (monotrich, awl, auchene, and zigzag) (J:50575).

Phenotypic Similarity to Human Syndrome: hypohidrotic/anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (OMIM 305100, 224900, and 129490) Similar phenotypes have also been described in mice for the Tabby allelic series at the Eda locus.

Molecular Note This allele involves a G to A transition mutation at nucleotide 1,135 that causes the amino acid change: glutamate to lysine at position 379 (E379K). [MGI Ref ID J:56496]
 
Allele Symbol Ostm1gl
Allele Name grey-lethal
Allele Type Spontaneous
Common Name(s) gl; grey lethal;
Strain of OriginSTOCK Tyr
Gene Symbol and Name Ostm1, osteopetrosis associated transmembrane protein 1
Chromosome 10
Gene Common Name(s) 1200002H13Rik; AW123348; HSPC019; RIKEN cDNA 1200002H13 gene; expressed sequence AW123348; gl; grey-lethal;
Molecular Note The mutation in the grey lethal mouse was identified as a genomic deletion of the 5' region of the gene. The deletion spanned 7.5 kb and included the promoter, the first exon and part of the first intron. The genomic sequence also included 460 bp corresponding to the 3' UTR of a LINE1 element at the deletion breakpoints. [MGI Ref ID J:82658]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Ostm1gl,

MELT



Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Additional References

Chalhoub N; Benachenhou N; Rajapurohitam V; Pata M; Ferron M; Frattini A; Villa A; Vacher J. 2003. Grey-lethal mutation induces severe malignant autosomal recessive osteopetrosis in mouse and human. Nat Med 9(4):399-406. [PubMed: 12627228]  [MGI Ref ID J:82658]

Marks SC Jr; Walker DG. 1969. The role of the parafollicular cell of the thyroid gland in the pathogenesis of congenital osteopetrosis in mice. Am J Anat 126(3):299-313. [PubMed: 5362475]  [MGI Ref ID J:5140]

Murphy HM. 1972. Calcitonin-like activity in the circulation of osteopetrotic grey-lethal mice. J Endocrinol 53(1):139-50. [PubMed: 4336559]  [MGI Ref ID J:5269]

Rajapurohitam V; Chalhoub N; Benachenhou N; Neff L; Baron R; Vacher J. 2001. The mouse osteopetrotic grey-lethal mutation induces a defect in osteoclast maturation/function. Bone 28(5):513-23. [PubMed: 11344051]  [MGI Ref ID J:82886]

Edardl-J related

Charles C; Pantalacci S; Tafforeau P; Headon D; Laudet V; Viriot L. 2009. Distinct impacts of Eda and Edar loss of function on the mouse dentition. PLoS ONE 4(4):e4985. [PubMed: 19340299]  [MGI Ref ID J:148176]

Ferron M; Boudiffa M; Arsenault M; Rached M; Pata M; Giroux S; Elfassihi L; Kisseleva M; Majerus PW; Rousseau F; Vacher J. 2011. Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase B as a regulator of bone mass in mice and humans. Cell Metab 14(4):466-77. [PubMed: 21982707]  [MGI Ref ID J:177648]

Green MC; Durham D; Mayer TC; Hoppe PC. 1977. Evidence from chimaeras for the pattern of proliferation of epidermis in the mouse. Genet Res 29(3):279-84. [PubMed: 892445]  [MGI Ref ID J:5859]

Headon DJ; Overbeek PA. 1999. Involvement of a novel Tnf receptor homologue in hair follicle induction [see comments] Nat Genet 22(4):370-4. [PubMed: 10431242]  [MGI Ref ID J:56496]

Jaskoll T; Zhou YM; Trump G; Melnick M. 2003. Ectodysplasin receptor-mediated signaling is essential for embryonic submandibular salivary gland development. Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 271(2):322-31. [PubMed: 12629675]  [MGI Ref ID J:105968]

Kamberov YG; Wang S; Tan J; Gerbault P; Wark A; Tan L; Yang Y; Li S; Tang K; Chen H; Powell A; Itan Y; Fuller D; Lohmueller J; Mao J; Schachar A; Paymer M; Hostetter E; Byrne E; Burnett M; McMahon AP; Thomas MG; Lieberman DE; Jin L; Tabin CJ; Morgan BA; Sabeti PC. 2013. Modeling Recent Human Evolution in Mice by Expression of a Selected EDAR Variant. Cell 152(4):691-702. [PubMed: 23415220]  [MGI Ref ID J:193816]

Majumder K; Shawlot W; Schuster G; Harrison W; Elder FF; Overbeek PA. 1998. YAC rescue of downless locus mutations in mice. Mamm Genome 9(11):863-8. [PubMed: 9799834]  [MGI Ref ID J:50575]

Pangrazio A; Poliani PL; Megarbane A; Lefranc G; Lanino E; Di Rocco M; Rucci F; Lucchini F; Ravanini M; Facchetti F; Abinun M; Vezzoni P; Villa A; Frattini A. 2006. Mutations in OSTM1 (grey lethal) define a particularly severe form of autosomal recessive osteopetrosis with neural involvement. J Bone Miner Res 21(7):1098-105. [PubMed: 16813530]  [MGI Ref ID J:128090]

Schmidt-Ullrich R; Tobin DJ; Lenhard D; Schneider P; Paus R; Scheidereit C. 2006. NF-{kappa}B transmits Eda A1/EdaR signalling to activate Shh and cyclin D1 expression, and controls post-initiation hair placode down growth. Development 133(6):1045-57. [PubMed: 16481354]  [MGI Ref ID J:106549]

The Jackson Laboratory Office of Genetic Resources. 1961. Registry of Remutation at The Jackson Laboratory MGI Direct Data Submission :.  [MGI Ref ID J:84767]

Tucker AS; Headon DJ; Schneider P; Ferguson BM; Overbeek P; Tschopp J; Sharpe PT. 2000. Edar/Eda interactions regulate enamel knot formation in tooth morphogenesis Development 127(21):4691-700. [PubMed: 11023871]  [MGI Ref ID J:64683]

Wells KL; Mou C; Headon DJ; Tucker AS. 2011. Defects and rescue of the minor salivary glands in Eda pathway mutants. Dev Biol 349(2):137-46. [PubMed: 20969842]  [MGI Ref ID J:168036]

Ostm1gl related

BATEMAN N. 1954. Bone growth: a study of the grey-lethal and microphthalmic mutants of the mouse. J Anat 88(2):212-62. [PubMed: 13162938]  [MGI Ref ID J:12990]

Bosman EA; Estabel J; Ismail O; Podrini C; White JK; Steel KP. 2013. Omi, a recessive mutation on chromosome 10, is a novel allele of Ostm1. Mamm Genome 24(1-2):44-53. [PubMed: 23160729]  [MGI Ref ID J:195249]

Chalhoub N; Benachenhou N; Rajapurohitam V; Pata M; Ferron M; Frattini A; Villa A; Vacher J. 2003. Grey-lethal mutation induces severe malignant autosomal recessive osteopetrosis in mouse and human. Nat Med 9(4):399-406. [PubMed: 12627228]  [MGI Ref ID J:82658]

Chalhoub N; Benachenhou N; Vacher J. 2001. Physical and transcriptional map of the mouse Chromosome 10 proximal region syntenic to human 6q16-q21. Mamm Genome 12(12):887-92. [PubMed: 11707774]  [MGI Ref ID J:72844]

Ferron M; Boudiffa M; Arsenault M; Rached M; Pata M; Giroux S; Elfassihi L; Kisseleva M; Majerus PW; Rousseau F; Vacher J. 2011. Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase B as a regulator of bone mass in mice and humans. Cell Metab 14(4):466-77. [PubMed: 21982707]  [MGI Ref ID J:177648]

Gruneberg H. 1935. A new sub-lethal colour mutation in the house mouse Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 118:321-42.  [MGI Ref ID J:15551]

Gruneberg H. 1936. Grey-lethal, a new mutation in the house mouse. J Hered 27:105-109.  [MGI Ref ID J:13053]

Heraud C; Griffiths A; Pandruvada SN; Kilimann MW; Pata M; Vacher J. 2014. Severe neurodegeneration with impaired autophagy mechanism triggered by ostm1 deficiency. J Biol Chem 289(20):13912-25. [PubMed: 24719316]  [MGI Ref ID J:214117]

Hollinshead MB; Schneider LC; Smith ME. 1975. Prenatal development of the grey lethal mouse. I. Teeth and jaws. Anat Rec 182(3):305-19. [PubMed: 1155801]  [MGI Ref ID J:5561]

Lange PF; Wartosch L; Jentsch TJ; Fuhrmann JC. 2006. ClC-7 requires Ostm1 as a beta-subunit to support bone resorption and lysosomal function. Nature 440(7081):220-3. [PubMed: 16525474]  [MGI Ref ID J:106978]

Marks SC Jr; Walker DG. 1969. The role of the parafollicular cell of the thyroid gland in the pathogenesis of congenital osteopetrosis in mice. Am J Anat 126(3):299-313. [PubMed: 5362475]  [MGI Ref ID J:5140]

Murphy HM. 1972. Calcitonin-like activity in the circulation of osteopetrotic grey-lethal mice. J Endocrinol 53(1):139-50. [PubMed: 4336559]  [MGI Ref ID J:5269]

Pangrazio A; Poliani PL; Megarbane A; Lefranc G; Lanino E; Di Rocco M; Rucci F; Lucchini F; Ravanini M; Facchetti F; Abinun M; Vezzoni P; Villa A; Frattini A. 2006. Mutations in OSTM1 (grey lethal) define a particularly severe form of autosomal recessive osteopetrosis with neural involvement. J Bone Miner Res 21(7):1098-105. [PubMed: 16813530]  [MGI Ref ID J:128090]

Pata M; Heraud C; Vacher J. 2008. OSTM1 bone defect reveals an intercellular hematopoietic crosstalk. J Biol Chem 283(45):30522-30. [PubMed: 18790735]  [MGI Ref ID J:143111]

Rajapurohitam V; Chalhoub N; Benachenhou N; Neff L; Baron R; Vacher J. 2001. The mouse osteopetrotic grey-lethal mutation induces a defect in osteoclast maturation/function. Bone 28(5):513-23. [PubMed: 11344051]  [MGI Ref ID J:82886]

Silvers WK. 1979. The Coat Colors of Mice; A Model for Mammalian Gene Action and Interaction. In: The Coat Colors of Mice. Springer-Verlag, New York.  [MGI Ref ID J:78801]

Swank RT; Reddington M; Howlett O; Novak EK. 1991. Platelet storage pool deficiency associated with inherited abnormalities of the inner ear in the mouse pigment mutants muted and mocha. Blood 78(8):2036-44. [PubMed: 1912584]  [MGI Ref ID J:29151]

Vacher J; Bernard H. 1999. Genetic localization and transmission of the mouse osteopetrotic grey-lethal mutation. Mamm Genome 10(3):239-43. [PubMed: 10051318]  [MGI Ref ID J:53815]

Walker DG. 1975. Bone resorption restored in osteopetrotic mice by transplants of normal bone marrow and spleen cells. Science 190(4216):784-5. [PubMed: 1105786]  [MGI Ref ID J:5598]

Walker DG. 1975. Spleen cells transmit osteopetrosis in mice. Science 190(4216):785-7. [PubMed: 1198094]  [MGI Ref ID J:5599]

Weinert S; Jabs S; Supanchart C; Schweizer M; Gimber N; Richter M; Rademann J; Stauber T; Kornak U; Jentsch TJ. 2010. Lysosomal Pathology and Osteopetrosis upon Loss of H+-Driven Lysosomal Cl- Accumulation. Science :. [PubMed: 20430974]  [MGI Ref ID J:160702]

Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $2525.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3283.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

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Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Control Information

  Control
   Untyped from the colony
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


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The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
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Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
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Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


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General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

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phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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