Strain Name:

SH1/LeJ

Stock Number:

000271

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Availability:

Cryopreserved - Ready for recovery

Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Type Spontaneous Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Type Inbred Strain;
Additional information on Inbred Strains.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Specieslaboratory mouse
GenerationF97p
Generation Definitions

Appearance
chinchilla, circles
Related Genotype: Tyrc-ch Myo7ash1/Tyrc-ch Myo7ash1

chinchilla, unaffected
Related Genotype: Tyrc-ch Myo7ash1/Tyrc-ch +

Important Note
This strain is homozygous for Tyrc-ch and segregating for Myo7ash1.

Description
Mice homozygous for the shaker 1 spontaneous mutation (Myo7ash1) show circling, head-tossing, deafness, and hyperactivity characteristic of this type of mutant mice. Viability is normal, and breeding ability is high for a circling mutant. Homozygous mutant mice are most often deaf and swim well on the surface of water up to 4 weeks of age and more but lose the ability later. The degenerative changes of the labyrinth may occur a little later than in some of the other waltzing mutants. By light microscopy, the changes are seen to consist of degeneration of the organ of Corti, the spiral ganglion, and the stria vascularis in the cochlea, and of the saccular macula and the vestibular ganglion in the vestibular labyrinth.

Development
The shaker 1 (Myo7ash1) strain originated in 1957 with two FS/Ei siblings at F5 mated. One sibling was also mated to a C57BL/6J and the offspring of the two FS/Ei mice were mated to a C3HeB/FeJ. Several within stock matings were made from both crosses and 2 siblings were each mated to a C3HeB/FeJ. Two generations were stock bred and the chinchilla shaker1 genotype was selected for inbreeding with the Myo7ash1 locus segregating. It was cryopreserved in 1989 by mating chinchilla shaker1 (Tyrc-ch Myo7ash1/Tyrc-ch Myo7ash1) males to chinchilla but shaker1 heterozygous (Tyrc-ch Myo7ash1/Tyrc-ch +) females at F96.

Control Information

  Control
   Heterozygote from the colony
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying   Myo7ash1 allele
000619   FS/EiJ
View Strains carrying   Myo7ash1     (1 strain)

View Strains carrying   Tyrc-ch     (6 strains)

Strains carrying other alleles of Myo7a
003184   B6.Cg-Myo7ash1-8J/J
005468   C57BL/6J-Myo7ash1-11J/J
002919   STOCK Myo7ash1-7J/J
View Strains carrying other alleles of Myo7a     (3 strains)

Strains carrying other alleles of Tyr
000090   129S1/Sv-Oca2+ Tyr+ KitlSl-J/J
005445   A.B6 Tyr+-Cybanmf333/J
005012   A.B6 Tyr+-Myo5ad-l31J/J
002565   A.B6-Tyr+/J
001017   AKXD10/TyJ
000765   AKXD13/TyJ
000954   AKXD15/TyJ
000958   AKXD16/TyJ
001093   AKXD18/TyJ
001062   AKXD21/TyJ
000947   AKXD22/TyJ
000969   AKXD24/TyJ
000777   AKXD6/TyJ
000763   AKXD9/TyJ
000409   B10.129P-H1b Hbbd Tyrc Ea7a/(5M)oSnJ
000418   B10.129P-H1b Tyrc Hbbd/(5M)nSnJ
000432   B10.C-H1b Hbbd Tyrc/(41N)SnJ
000580   B10.D2/nSn-Tyrc-4J/J
000822   B6 x 129S1/SvEi Oca2+ Tyr+-Vsx2or-J/J
017614   B6(Cg)-Tyrc-2J Tg(UBC-mCherry)1Phbs/J
000058   B6(Cg)-Tyrc-2J/J
008647   B6.129P2(Cg)-Trpa1tm1.1Kykw Tyrc-2J/J
000383   B6.C-Tyrc H1b Hbbd/ByJ
013590   B6.Cg-Braftm1Mmcm Ptentm1Hwu Tg(Tyr-cre/ERT2)13Bos/BosJ
003819   B6.Cg-Per2tm1Brd Tyrc-Brd/J
023429   B6.Cg-Tyrc-2J Cdkn1atm1Hpw/J
007484   B6.Cg-Tyrc-2J Tg(Tyr)3412ARpw Tg(Sry-EGFP)92Ei/EiJ
000035   B6.Cg-Tyrc-J/J
000104   B6.Cg-Tyrc-h/J
012328   B6.Cg-Tg(Tyr-cre/ERT2)13Bos/J
000054   B6.D2-Tyrc-p/J
023428   B6;129X1-Tyrc-2J Cdkn1atm2Hpw/J
000899   C.B6-Tyr+ Hbbs/J
000339   C3H/HeJ-Tyrc-9J/J
001294   C3H/HeJ-Tyrc-a/J
001002   C57BL/10SnJ-Tyrc-11J/J
005349   C57BL/6J Tyrc-2J-awag/GrsrJ
012257   CB6-Tg(Tyr-TAg)BJjw/Mmjax
001006   CBA/J-Tyrc-10J/J
000657   CE/J
007483   FVB.Cg-Tg(Tyr)3412ARpw Tg(Sry-EGFP)92Ei/EiJ
000494   J.Cg-Oca2+ Tyr+ Lystbg/J
002281   NFS.C58-Tyr+/J
004304   NOD.CBALs-Tyr+/LtJ
001759   STOCK A Tyrc Sha/J
018129   STOCK Fah1R Tyrc/RJ
000006   STOCK Hk Tyrc/J
014173   STOCK Omptm1.1(COP4*/EYFP)Tboz/J
000206   STOCK a/a Tyrc-h/J
View Strains carrying other alleles of Tyr     (49 strains)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Phenotypic Data

Phenotypic Data
Mouse Phenome Database
View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
- Model with phenotypic similarity to human disease where etiologies involve orthologs. Human genes are associated with this disease. Orthologs of those genes appear in the mouse genotype(s).
Usher Syndrome, Type I; USH1
- Potential model based on gene homology relationships. Phenotypic similarity to the human disease has not been tested.
Albinism, Ocular, with Sensorineural Deafness   (TYR)
Albinism, Oculocutaneous, Type IA; OCA1A   (TYR)
Albinism, Oculocutaneous, Type IB; OCA1B   (TYR)
Deafness, Autosomal Dominant 11; DFNA11   (MYO7A)
Deafness, Autosomal Recessive 2; DFNB2   (MYO7A)
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Myo7ash1/Myo7ash1

        SH1/LeJ
  • hearing/vestibular/ear phenotype
  • absent linear vestibular evoked potential
    • VESPs are absent at the maximum stimulus intensity used   (MGI Ref ID J:116914)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • circling   (MGI Ref ID J:116914)
  • impaired swimming
    • mice exhibit reduced swimming ability; mice can swim at or near the surface of the water, but do not maintain a horizontal body position   (MGI Ref ID J:116914)

The following phenotype information may relate to a genetic background differing from this JAX® Mice strain.

Myo7ash1/Myo7ash1

        involves: BALB
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal behavior
    • when placed on a cold concrete floor mice rarely travel more than 6 feet and this distance is covered in short jerky stops and starts   (MGI Ref ID J:15554)
    • absent pinna reflex
      • by 22 days   (MGI Ref ID J:14858)
    • circling   (MGI Ref ID J:93998)
      • 14% of mice exhibit a moderate circling behavior with a tendency to circle counter-clockwise   (MGI Ref ID J:15554)
    • head tossing   (MGI Ref ID J:93998)
    • hyperactivity   (MGI Ref ID J:15554)
    • impaired swimming
      • while mice can swim at a young age their lose their ability to do so in the second month of age   (MGI Ref ID J:13130)
    • increased anxiety-related response   (MGI Ref ID J:15554)
    • increased fluid intake
      • water consumption is increased compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:15554)
    • increased food intake   (MGI Ref ID J:15554)
    • jerky movement
      • mice display a nervous head movement characterized by rapid, successive jerking of the head upwards accompanied by sniffing and twitching of the vibrissae   (MGI Ref ID J:15554)
      • however, mice can cease their head jerking for periods of time and appear normal   (MGI Ref ID J:15554)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • slow postnatal weight gain   (MGI Ref ID J:15554)
  • hearing/vestibular/ear phenotype
  • abnormal ear physiology
    • cochlear potential is delayed by one day compared to in wild-type mice and mice do not respond to the full range of frequencies   (MGI Ref ID J:14858)
    • eighth nerve activity N1 and N2 is delayed and never obtain the amplitude that they do in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:14858)
    • by day 22, eighth nerve action potential has disappeared   (MGI Ref ID J:14858)
    • deafness   (MGI Ref ID J:93998)
      • mice become deaf at around 22 to 30 days   (MGI Ref ID J:15554)
      • by 22 days hearing is lost   (MGI Ref ID J:14858)
  • abnormal organ of Corti morphology
    • formation of fluid spaces is delayed with no tunnel spaces evident until day 12 and intercellular spaces between hair cells not apparent until day 21   (MGI Ref ID J:14846)
    • maturation of the organ of Corti is delayed as indicated by the presence of round or ovoid shaped outer hair cells at day 10 and deformation of Nuel's spaces and the tunnel of Corti   (MGI Ref ID J:28477)
    • by day 18 Nuel's spaces have not formed and the tectorial membrane remains attached to the reticular lamina   (MGI Ref ID J:28477)
    • abnormal cochlear hair cell morphology
      • the intercellular spaces that appear between hair cells occur at day 21 instead of day 10 as in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:14846)
      • efferent nerve innervation does not occur until day 12 compared to day 10 in wild-type mice and only a small number can be found   (MGI Ref ID J:14846)
      • mitochondrial swelling and vesicle formation are observed in both afferent and efferent nerve endings as mice age   (MGI Ref ID J:14846)
      • no auditory hair cells can be found between the level of the reticular lamina and the tectorial membrane   (MGI Ref ID J:14846)
      • abnormal cochlear OHC efferent innervation pattern
        • efferent arrival at the outer hair cell is delayed   (MGI Ref ID J:28477)
        • however, efferent nerve supply to the inner hair cells is normal if not over-abundant   (MGI Ref ID J:28477)
      • cochlear hair cell degeneration   (MGI Ref ID J:93998)
        • degeneration of the hair cells occurs at 7 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:13130)
        • hair cells are absent in adult mice   (MGI Ref ID J:14846)
        • hair cell degeneration is apparent as early as 12 days   (MGI Ref ID J:14846)
        • by 4 months   (MGI Ref ID J:14858)
  • stria vascularis degeneration
    • by 4 months, the stria vascularis is atrophic   (MGI Ref ID J:14858)
  • vestibular saccular macula degeneration
    • at 21 days   (MGI Ref ID J:13130)
  • reproductive system phenotype
  • reduced male fertility
    • males tend towards infertility because of their nervous condition   (MGI Ref ID J:15554)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal cochlear hair cell morphology
    • the intercellular spaces that appear between hair cells occur at day 21 instead of day 10 as in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:14846)
    • efferent nerve innervation does not occur until day 12 compared to day 10 in wild-type mice and only a small number can be found   (MGI Ref ID J:14846)
    • mitochondrial swelling and vesicle formation are observed in both afferent and efferent nerve endings as mice age   (MGI Ref ID J:14846)
    • no auditory hair cells can be found between the level of the reticular lamina and the tectorial membrane   (MGI Ref ID J:14846)
    • abnormal cochlear OHC efferent innervation pattern
      • efferent arrival at the outer hair cell is delayed   (MGI Ref ID J:28477)
      • however, efferent nerve supply to the inner hair cells is normal if not over-abundant   (MGI Ref ID J:28477)
    • cochlear hair cell degeneration   (MGI Ref ID J:93998)
      • degeneration of the hair cells occurs at 7 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:13130)
      • hair cells are absent in adult mice   (MGI Ref ID J:14846)
      • hair cell degeneration is apparent as early as 12 days   (MGI Ref ID J:14846)
      • by 4 months   (MGI Ref ID J:14858)
  • cochlear ganglion degeneration
    • after 2 months   (MGI Ref ID J:13130)
    • spiral ganglia formation is delayed and fewer spiral ganglia are present   (MGI Ref ID J:14846)
    • by day 10, spiral ganglion cells are unmyelinated and contain a large number of swollen mitochondria, dense bodies and an expanse of smooth endoplasmic reticulum   (MGI Ref ID J:28477)
    • at 22 days, mice have few spiral ganglia that are irregular, small, show more chromatic stiplings and minimal vascuolization   (MGI Ref ID J:14858)
    • by 4 months, ganglion cells have atrophied   (MGI Ref ID J:14858)
  • gliosis
    • mice exhibit increases fibrous astrocytes in the medial vestibular nucleus   (MGI Ref ID J:14891)
  • vestibular ganglion hypoplasia
    • at 67 days   (MGI Ref ID J:13130)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Myo7ash1 related

Dermatology Research
Color and White Spotting Defects
      oculocutaneous albinism, type I

Neurobiology Research
Hearing Defects
Tremor Defects
Vestibular Defects

Sensorineural Research
Hearing Defects
Vestibular Defects

Tyrc-ch related

Dermatology Research
Color and White Spotting Defects

Developmental Biology Research
Neurodevelopmental Defects
Skeletal Defects

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Myo7ash1
Allele Name shaker 1
Allele Type Spontaneous
Common Name(s) sh1; shaker-1;
Strain of OriginBALB at F12
Gene Symbol and Name Myo7a, myosin VIIA
Chromosome 7
Gene Common Name(s) DFNA11; DFNB2; Hdb; MYOVIIA; MYU7A; Myo7; NSRD2; USH1B; headbanger; myosin VII; neuroscience mutagenesis facility, 371; nmf371; polka; sh-1; sh1; shaker 1;
Molecular Note A G-to-C transversion mutation is predicted to result in an arginine to proline change at position 502 in the encoded protein. This mutation is predicted to lie within the head domain of the protein. Northern blot analysis indicated that mRNA expression, size, and stability were unaffected. Immunoblot analysis showed that normal levels of the protein was expressed. [MGI Ref ID J:23257]
 
Allele Symbol Tyrc-ch
Allele Name chinchilla
Allele Type Spontaneous
Common Name(s) cch; cr;
Strain of Originfancier's stock
Gene Symbol and Name Tyr, tyrosinase
Chromosome 7
Gene Common Name(s) ATN; C; CMM8; OCA1; OCA1A; OCAIA; SHEP3; albino; c; skc35; skin/coat color 35;
Molecular Note The mutation in the chinchilla allele was found to be a G to A point mutation that results in an amino acid change at position 464 from alanine to threonine. [MGI Ref ID J:19279]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Additional References

Gibson F; Walsh J; Mburu P; Varela A; Brown KA; Antonio M; Beisel KW; Steel KP; Brown SD. 1995. A type VII myosin encoded by the mouse deafness gene shaker-1. Nature 374(6517):62-4. [PubMed: 7870172]  [MGI Ref ID J:23257]

Myo7ash1 related

Bossi G; Booth S; Clark R; Davis EG; Liesner R; Richards K; Starcevic M; Stinchcombe J; Trambas C; Dell'Angelica EC; Griffiths GM. 2005. Normal lytic granule secretion by cytotoxic T lymphocytes deficient in BLOC-1, -2 and -3 and myosins Va, VIIa and XV. Traffic 6(3):243-51. [PubMed: 15702992]  [MGI Ref ID J:105404]

Cabraja M; Baurle J. 2007. Vestibular ganglion neurons survive hair cell defects in jerker, shaker, and Varitint-waddler mutants and downregulate calretinin expression. J Comp Neurol 504(4):418-26. [PubMed: 17663432]  [MGI Ref ID J:132913]

DEOL MS. 1956. The anatomy and development of the mutants pirouette, shaker-1 and waltzer in the mouse. Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 145(919):206-13. [PubMed: 13336002]  [MGI Ref ID J:13130]

Deol MS; Green MC. 1969. Cattanach's translocation as a tool for studying the action of the shaker-1 gene in the mouse. J Exp Zool 170(3):301-9. [PubMed: 5795329]  [MGI Ref ID J:5118]

El-Amraoui A; Petit C. 2005. Usher I syndrome: unravelling the mechanisms that underlie the cohesion of the growing hair bundle in inner ear sensory cells. J Cell Sci 118(Pt 20):4593-603. [PubMed: 16219682]  [MGI Ref ID J:102194]

Futter CE; Ramalho JS; Jaissle GB; Seeliger MW; Seabra MC. 2004. The role of Rab27a in the regulation of melanosome distribution within retinal pigment epithelial cells. Mol Biol Cell 15(5):2264-75. [PubMed: 14978221]  [MGI Ref ID J:91408]

Gibson F; Walsh J; Mburu P; Varela A; Brown KA; Antonio M; Beisel KW; Steel KP; Brown SD. 1995. A type VII myosin encoded by the mouse deafness gene shaker-1. Nature 374(6517):62-4. [PubMed: 7870172]  [MGI Ref ID J:23257]

Hasson T; Walsh J; Cable J; Mooseker MS; Brown SD; Steel KP. 1997. Effects of shaker-1 mutations on myosin-VIIa protein and mRNA expression. Cell Motil Cytoskeleton 37(2):127-38. [PubMed: 9186010]  [MGI Ref ID J:42644]

Jones SM; Johnson KR; Yu H; Erway LC; Alagramam KN; Pollak N; Jones TA. 2005. A quantitative survey of gravity receptor function in mutant mouse strains. J Assoc Res Otolaryngol 6(4):297-310. [PubMed: 16235133]  [MGI Ref ID J:116914]

KOCHER W. 1960. [Studies on the genetics and pathology of the development of 8 labyrinth mutants (deaf-waltzer-shaker mutants) in the mouse (Mus musculus).] Z Vererbungsl 91:114-40. [PubMed: 13853422]  [MGI Ref ID J:15164]

Kikuchi K; Hilding DA. 1965. The defective organ of Corti in Shaker-1 mice Acta Otolaryngol (Stockh) 60:287-303.  [MGI Ref ID J:14846]

Lewis MA; Quint E; Glazier AM; Fuchs H; De Angelis MH; Langford C; van Dongen S; Abreu-Goodger C; Piipari M; Redshaw N; Dalmay T; Moreno-Pelayo MA; Enright AJ; Steel KP. 2009. An ENU-induced mutation of miR-96 associated with progressive hearing loss in mice. Nat Genet 41(5):614-8. [PubMed: 19363478]  [MGI Ref ID J:151354]

Liu X; Ondek B; Williams DS. 1998. Mutant myosin VIIa causes defective melanosome distribution in the RPE of shaker-1 mice [letter] Nat Genet 19(2):117-8. [PubMed: 9620764]  [MGI Ref ID J:48237]

Liu X; Udovichenko IP; Brown SD; Steel KP; Williams DS. 1999. Myosin VIIa participates in opsin transport through the photoreceptor cilium. J Neurosci 19(15):6267-74. [PubMed: 10414956]  [MGI Ref ID J:56998]

Lord EM; Gates WH. 1929. Shaker, a new mutation of the house mouse (Mus musculus) Am Naturalist 63:435-42.  [MGI Ref ID J:15554]

MIKAELIAN DO; RUBEN RJ. 1964. HEARING DEGENERATION IN SHAKER-1 MOUSE. CORRELATION OF PHYSIOLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS WITH BEHAVIORAL RESPONSES AND WITH COCHLEAR ANATOMY. Arch Otolaryngol 80:418-30. [PubMed: 14198707]  [MGI Ref ID J:14858]

Mburu P; Liu XZ; Walsh J; Saw D Jr; Cope MJ; Gibson F; Kendrick-Jones J; Steel KP; Brown SD. 1997. Mutation analysis of the mouse myosin VIIA deafness gene. Genes Funct 1(3):191-203. [PubMed: 9680294]  [MGI Ref ID J:49926]

Reiners J; Nagel-Wolfrum K; Jurgens K; Marker T; Wolfrum U. 2006. Molecular basis of human Usher syndrome: deciphering the meshes of the Usher protein network provides insights into the pathomechanisms of the Usher disease. Exp Eye Res 83(1):97-119. [PubMed: 16545802]  [MGI Ref ID J:116295]

Rhodes CR; Hertzano R; Fuchs H; Bell RE; de Angelis MH; Steel KP; Avraham KB. 2004. A Myo7a mutation cosegregates with stereocilia defects and low-frequency hearing impairment. Mamm Genome 15(9):686-97. [PubMed: 15389316]  [MGI Ref ID J:93998]

Self T; Mahony M; Fleming J; Walsh J; Brown SD; Steel KP. 1998. Shaker-1 mutations reveal roles for myosin VIIA in both development and function of cochlear hair cells. Development 125(4):557-66. [PubMed: 9435277]  [MGI Ref ID J:46373]

Shnerson A; Lenoir M; van de Water TR; Pujol R. 1983. The pattern of sensorineural degeneration in the cochlea of the deaf shaker-1 mouse: ultrastructural observations. Brain Res 285(3):305-15. [PubMed: 6627025]  [MGI Ref ID J:28477]

Sun JC; van Alphen AM; Wagenaar M; Huygen P; Hoogenraad CC; Hasson T; Koekkoek SK; Bohne BA; De Zeeuw CI. 2001. Origin of vestibular dysfunction in Usher syndrome type 1B. Neurobiol Dis 8(1):69-77. [PubMed: 11162241]  [MGI Ref ID J:110706]

Tan Creti DM. 1969. Neuropathology of mutant mice with auditory and/or vestibular deficiencies J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 28:159.  [MGI Ref ID J:14891]

Tyrc-ch related

Anderson PD; Lam MY; Poirier C; Bishop CE; Nadeau JH. 2009. The role of the mouse y chromosome on susceptibility to testicular germ cell tumors. Cancer Res 69(8):3614-8. [PubMed: 19351821]  [MGI Ref ID J:147731]

Beermann F; Ruppert S; Hummler E; Bosch FX; Muller G; Ruther U; Schutz G. 1990. Rescue of the albino phenotype by introduction of a functional tyrosinase gene into mice. EMBO J 9(9):2819-26. [PubMed: 2118105]  [MGI Ref ID J:19279]

Bhattacharya C; Aggarwal S; Zhu R; Kumar M; Zhao M; Meistrich ML; Matin A. 2007. The mouse dead-end gene isoform alpha is necessary for germ cell and embryonic viability. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 355(1):194-9. [PubMed: 17291453]  [MGI Ref ID J:118625]

Cattanach BM. 1961. A chemically-induced variegated-type position effect in the mouse. Z Vererbungsl 92:165-82. [PubMed: 13877379]  [MGI Ref ID J:160128]

Dobkin C; Rabe A; Dumas R; El Idrissi A; Haubenstock H; Brown WT. 2000. Fmr1 knockout mouse has a distinctive strain-specific learning impairment. Neuroscience 100(2):423-9. [PubMed: 11008180]  [MGI Ref ID J:119166]

Dunn LC. 1936. Studies on multiple allelomorphic series in the house mouse. I. Description of agouti and albino series of allelomorphs J Genet 33:443-53.  [MGI Ref ID J:22600]

Erickson RP; Gluecksohn-Waelsch S; Cori CF. 1968. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency caused by radiation-induced alleles at the albino locus in the mouse. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 59(2):437-44. [PubMed: 4296364]  [MGI Ref ID J:5063]

Errijgers V; Van Dam D; Gantois I; Van Ginneken CJ; Grossman AW; D'Hooge R; De Deyn PP; Kooy RF. 2007. FVB.129P2-Pde6b(+) Tyr(c-ch)/Ant, a sighted variant of the FVB/N mouse strain suitable for behavioral analysis. Genes Brain Behav 6(6):552-7. [PubMed: 17083330]  [MGI Ref ID J:137779]

Feldman HW. 1935. A fifth allelomorph in the albino series of the house mouse J Mammal 16:207-210.  [MGI Ref ID J:83666]

Feldman HW. 1922. A fourth allelomorph in the albino series in mice Am Naturalist 56:573-574.  [MGI Ref ID J:14850]

Klebig ML; Kwon BS; Rinchik EM. 1992. Physical analysis of murine albino deletions that disrupt liver-specific gene regulation or mesoderm development. Mamm Genome 2(1):51-63. [PubMed: 1543902]  [MGI Ref ID J:1540]

Laiosa MD; Lai ZW; Thurmond TS; Fiore NC; DeRossi C; Holdener BC; Gasiewicz TA; Silverstone AE. 2002. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin causes alterations in lymphocyte development and thymic atrophy in hemopoietic chimeras generated from mice deficient in ARNT2. Toxicol Sci 69(1):117-24. [PubMed: 12215665]  [MGI Ref ID J:113951]

Lamoreux ML; Wakamatsu K; Ito S. 2001. Interaction of major coat color gene functions in mice as studied by chemical analysis of eumelanin and pheomelanin. Pigment Cell Res 14(1):23-31. [PubMed: 11277491]  [MGI Ref ID J:103803]

Lighthouse JK; Zhang L; Hsieh JC; Rosenquist T; Holdener BC. 2010. MESD is essential for apical localization of megalin/LRP2 in the visceral endoderm. Dev Dyn :. [PubMed: 21061374]  [MGI Ref ID J:168622]

Lossie AC; Nakamura H; Thomas SE; Justice MJ. 2005. Mutation of l7Rn3 shows that Odz4 is required for mouse gastrulation. Genetics 169(1):285-99. [PubMed: 15489520]  [MGI Ref ID J:96673]

Lyon MF. 1963. Attempts to test the inactive-X theory of dosage compensation in mammals Genet Res 4:93-103.  [MGI Ref ID J:272]

Medical Research Council (MRC) Harwell. 2012. Direct Data Submission 2012/01/26 MGI Direct Data Submission :.  [MGI Ref ID J:179802]

Moyer FH. 1966. Genetic variations in the fine structure and ontogeny of mouse melanin granules. Am Zool 6(1):43-66. [PubMed: 5902512]  [MGI Ref ID J:5001]

Pietropaolo S; Guilleminot A; Martin B; D'Amato FR; Crusio WE. 2011. Genetic-background modulation of core and variable autistic-like symptoms in Fmr1 knock-out mice. PLoS One 6(2):e17073. [PubMed: 21364941]  [MGI Ref ID J:171069]

RUSSELL ES. 1949. A quantitative histological study of the pigment found in the coat-color mutants of the house mouse; interdependence among the variable granule attributes. Genetics 34(2):133-45. [PubMed: 18117146]  [MGI Ref ID J:148461]

Russell ES. 1948. A Quantitative Histological Study of the Pigment Found in the Coat Color Mutants of the House Mouse. II. Estimates of the Total Volume of Pigment. Genetics 33(3):228-36. [PubMed: 17247280]  [MGI Ref ID J:148462]

Russell ES. 1946. A Quantitative Histological Study of the Pigment Found in the Coat-Color Mutants of the House Mouse. I. Variable Attributes of the Pigment Granules. Genetics 31(3):327-46. [PubMed: 17247200]  [MGI Ref ID J:148463]

Schedl A; Ruppert S; Kelsey G; Thies E; Niswander L; Magnuson T; Klebig ML; Rinchik EM; Schutz G. 1992. Chromosome jumping from flanking markers defines the minimal region for alf/hsdr-1 within the albino-deletion complex. Genomics 14(2):288-97. [PubMed: 1427845]  [MGI Ref ID J:2638]

Silvers WK. 1979. The Coat Colors of Mice; A Model for Mammalian Gene Action and Interaction. In: The Coat Colors of Mice. Springer-Verlag, New York.  [MGI Ref ID J:78801]

Strumbos JG; Brown MR; Kronengold J; Polley DB; Kaczmarek LK. 2010. Fragile X mental retardation protein is required for rapid experience-dependent regulation of the potassium channel Kv3.1b. J Neurosci 30(31):10263-71. [PubMed: 20685971]  [MGI Ref ID J:162850]

Sweet HO. 1987. Acromelanic (c<a>) Mouse News Lett 78:56.  [MGI Ref ID J:14994]

Takeuchi S; Yamamoto H; Takeuchi T. 1988. Expression of tyrosinase gene in mice Genome 30(Suppl 1):260 (Abstr.).  [MGI Ref ID J:30744]

Townsend D; Witkop CJ Jr; Mattson J. 1981. Tyrosinase subcellular distribution and kinetic parameters in wild type and C-locus mutant C57BL/6J mice. J Exp Zool 216(1):113-9. [PubMed: 6793688]  [MGI Ref ID J:6611]

Vasiliou V; Buetler T; Eaton DL; Nebert DW. 2000. Comparison of oxidative stress response parameters in newborn mouse liver versus simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hepatocyte cell lines. Biochem Pharmacol 59(6):703-12. [PubMed: 10677587]  [MGI Ref ID J:60274]

Vasiliou V; Reuter SF; Nebert DW. 1997. Extrahepatic expression of NAD(P)H:menadione oxidoreductase, UDP glucuronosyltransferase-1A6, microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase, and hepatic nuclear factor-1 alpha mRNAs in ch/ch and 14CoS/14CoS mice. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 233(3):631-6. [PubMed: 9168903]  [MGI Ref ID J:40515]

Wu M; Rinchik EM; Wilkinson E; Johnson DK. 1997. Inherited somatic mosaicism caused by an intracisternal A particle insertion in the mouse tyrosinase gene. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 94(3):890-4. [PubMed: 9023352]  [MGI Ref ID J:38209]

Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3175.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.
    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 11 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice
    Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $4127.50
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.
    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 11 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice
    Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

General Supply Notes

  • View the complete collection of spontaneous mutants in the Mouse Mutant Resource.

Control Information

  Control
   Heterozygote from the colony
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Important Note

This strain is homozygous for Tyrc-ch and segregating for Myo7ash1.

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
Surgical and Preconditioning Services
JAX® Services
Customer Services and Support
Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
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Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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