Strain Name:

B6.Cg-Hrhr H2-T18a/J

Stock Number:

001737

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Availability:

Cryopreserved - Ready for recovery

Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Former Names B6.A-H2-T18a.HRS-Hrhr/J    (Changed: 17-JAN-12 )
B6.A-H2-T18a.HRS-Hr/J    (Changed: 15-DEC-04 )
B6.A-H2-T18a.HRS-hr/J    (Changed: 15-DEC-04 )
Type Congenic; Major Histocompatibility Congenic; Mutant Strain; Spontaneous Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Specieslaboratory mouse
Background Strain C57BL/6
Donor Strain T18a, A; Hrhr, HRS

Description
Mice homozygous for the hr mutation have a higher incidence and earlier onset of leukemia, reducible by virus-specific antibody. Deficiency of splenic T helper cells (Ly-1+) may account for low cellular immune response of homozygous mutant mice. The coat is normal on hr/hr mice up to 10 days but then hair is lost from the follicle. Waves of hair growth with few thin fuzzy hairs ocur at monthly intervals for some time but homozygotes eventually become continuously hairless. Vibrissae are repeatedly regrown and shed, becoming more abnormal with age. Toenails are long and curved. There is hyperkeratosis of statified epithelium and the upper part of hair canals beginning at 14 days. Hair club formation is abnormal. Cysts form from the hyperkeratotic upper part of hair canals and sheaths of abnormal follicles stranded in dermis. Some cysts also form from sebaceous glands. All cysts undergo sebaceous transformation and later keratinization.

In an attempt to offer alleles on well-characterized or multiple genetic backgrounds, alleles are frequently moved to a genetic background different from that on which an allele was first characterized. This is the case for the strain above. It should be noted that the phenotype could vary from that originally described. We will modify the strain description if necessary as published results become available.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying   H2-T18a allele
000469   B10.A-H2a H2-T18a/SgSnJ
000465   B10.BR-H2k2 H2-T18a/SgSnJ
004804   B10.BR-H2k2 H2-T18a/SgSnJJrep
View Strains carrying   H2-T18a     (3 strains)

Strains carrying   Hrhr allele
002922   D2.HRS-Hrhr/J
000673   HRS/J
002335   SKH2/J
000147   WLHR/LeJ
View Strains carrying   Hrhr     (4 strains)

View Strains carrying other alleles of H2-T18     (29 strains)

Strains carrying other alleles of Hr
007621   B6.129S6-Hrtm1Cct/J
000758   C57BL/6J-Hbbp Hrrh-7J/J
021500   C57BL/6J-Hrrh-10J/GrsrJ
000266   RHJ/Le
001591   RHJ/LeJ
View Strains carrying other alleles of Hr     (5 strains)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
- Potential model based on gene homology relationships. Phenotypic similarity to the human disease has not been tested.
Alopecia Universalis Congenita; ALUNC   (HR)
Atrichia with Papular Lesions; APL   (HR)
Hypotrichosis 4; HYPT4   (HR)
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Hrhr/Hrhr

        Background Not Specified
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • abnormal mammary gland morphology
    • small   (MGI Ref ID J:2409)
    • nipple at bottom of cup-shaped depression in skin   (MGI Ref ID J:2409)
    • no ducts   (MGI Ref ID J:2409)
  • sebaceous gland atrophy   (MGI Ref ID J:2409)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal nursing
    • failure   (MGI Ref ID J:2409)
  • integument phenotype
  • abnormal mammary gland morphology
    • small   (MGI Ref ID J:2409)
    • nipple at bottom of cup-shaped depression in skin   (MGI Ref ID J:2409)
    • no ducts   (MGI Ref ID J:2409)
  • abnormal skin morphology
    • thickened cutis   (MGI Ref ID J:2409)
    • abnormal dermis reticular layer morphology
      • cystic   (MGI Ref ID J:2409)
    • dermal cysts   (MGI Ref ID J:14889)
    • epidermal hyperplasia   (MGI Ref ID J:14940)
    • hyperkeratosis   (MGI Ref ID J:14940)
  • deformed nails
    • curved   (MGI Ref ID J:2409)
  • hairless   (MGI Ref ID J:2409)
    • beginning ~15 days of age and progressing from nose back   (MGI Ref ID J:2405)
  • sebaceous gland atrophy   (MGI Ref ID J:2409)

Hrhr/Hrhr

        HRS/J
  • hearing/vestibular/ear phenotype
  • absent linear vestibular evoked potential
    • VESPs are absent at the maximum stimulus intensity used   (MGI Ref ID J:116914)
  • tumorigenesis
  • increased leukemia incidence
    • increased incidence   (MGI Ref ID J:5726)
    • increased incidence   (MGI Ref ID J:5908)
    • at 8 to 10 months of age 45% of homozygotes have lymphoid leukemia, compared with only 1% in heterozygotes, and approximately 72% of these homozygotes develop myeloid leukemia later in life up to 18 months of age   (MGI Ref ID J:24786)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • decreased T cell number
    • of CD5+ T cells   (MGI Ref ID J:6087)
  • decreased T cell proliferation
    • to alloantigens by T helper cells   (MGI Ref ID J:6375)
  • increased macrophage cell number
    • although heterozygotes and homozygotes have the same total number of peritoneal cells, the percentage expressing Mac-1 is an average of 30% in homozygotes versus an average of 14% in heterozygotes   (MGI Ref ID J:150402)
  • immune system phenotype
  • decreased T cell number
    • of CD5+ T cells   (MGI Ref ID J:6087)
  • decreased T cell proliferation
    • to alloantigens by T helper cells   (MGI Ref ID J:6375)
  • increased macrophage cell number
    • although heterozygotes and homozygotes have the same total number of peritoneal cells, the percentage expressing Mac-1 is an average of 30% in homozygotes versus an average of 14% in heterozygotes   (MGI Ref ID J:150402)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
CD Antigens, Antigen Receptors, and Histocompatibility Markers

Hrhr related

Cancer Research
Increased Tumor Incidence
      Leukemia
      Leukemia: lymphocytic
      Lymphomas
      Lymphomas: thymic
      Skin Cancers
      Skin Cancers: Induced
Toxicology

Cardiovascular Research
Diet-Induced Atherosclerosis
      Relatively Resistant

Dermatology Research
Skin and Hair Texture Defects

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
Immunodeficiency Associated with Other Defects

Research Tools
Toxicology Research
      drug/compound testing

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol H2-T18a
Allele Name a variant
Allele Type Not Applicable
Common Name(s) Tlaa;
Gene Symbol and Name H2-T18, histocompatibility 2, T region locus 18
Chromosome 17
Gene Common Name(s) H-2T18; TL Ag; Tla; thymus leukemia antigen;
Molecular Note The allele H2-T18a determines presence of the antigenic specificities TL.1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7 and occurs in strains A, C57BR, C58, SJL, and others.
 
Allele Symbol Hrhr
Allele Name hairless
Allele Type Spontaneous
Common Name(s) SKH-1; hr;
Gene Symbol and Name Hr, hairless
Chromosome 14
Gene Common Name(s) ALUNC; AU; HSA277165; MUHH; MUHH1; N; ba; baldy; bldy; rh; rh-bmh; rhino-bald Mill Hill;
Molecular Note The hr allele is the result of a retroviral integration. Insertion of murine leukemia proviral sequences into intron 6 results in aberrant splicing of the gene. [MGI Ref ID J:19624] [MGI Ref ID J:92053] [MGI Ref ID J:9252]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Additional References

Cachon-Gonzalez MB; Fenner S; Coffin JM; Moran C; Best S; Stoye JP. 1994. Structure and expression of the hairless gene of mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 91(16):7717-21. [PubMed: 8052649]  [MGI Ref ID J:19624]

H2-T18a related

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Chen YT; Obata Y; Stockert E; Old LJ. 1985. Thymus-leukemia (TL) antigens of the mouse. Analysis of TL mRNA and TL cDNA TL+ and TL- strains. J Exp Med 162(4):1134-48. [PubMed: 3840195]  [MGI Ref ID J:8035]

Chorney MJ; Shen FW; Tung JS; Boyse EA. 1985. Additional products of the Tla locus of the mouse. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 82(20):7044-7. [PubMed: 3876563]  [MGI Ref ID J:8045]

Flaherty L; Rinchik E. 1980. A new allele and antigen at the Tla locus. Immunogenetics 11(2):205-8. [PubMed: 6157647]  [MGI Ref ID J:6368]

Gowdy KM; Nugent JL; Martinu T; Potts E; Snyder LD; Foster WM; Palmer SM. 2012. Protective role of T-bet and Th1 cytokines in pulmonary graft-versus-host disease and peribronchiolar fibrosis. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 46(2):249-56. [PubMed: 21960548]  [MGI Ref ID J:191909]

Shen FW; Chorney MJ; Boyse EA. 1982. Further polymorphism of the Tla locus defined by monoclonal TL antibodies. Immunogenetics 15(6):573-8. [PubMed: 7106865]  [MGI Ref ID J:6828]

Yamazaki K; Beauchamp GK; Bard J; Thomas L; Boyse EA. 1982. Chemosensory recognition of phenotypes determined by the Tla and H-2K regions of chromosome 17 of the mouse. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 79(24):7828-31. [PubMed: 6961454]  [MGI Ref ID J:6964]

Hrhr related

Aberg KM; Man MQ; Gallo RL; Ganz T; Crumrine D; Brown BE; Choi EH; Kim DK; Schroder JM; Feingold KR; Elias PM. 2008. Co-regulation and interdependence of the mammalian epidermal permeability and antimicrobial barriers. J Invest Dermatol 128(4):917-25. [PubMed: 17943185]  [MGI Ref ID J:135506]

Ahmad W; Panteleyev AA; Christiano AM. 1999. The molecular basis of congenital atrichia in humans and mice: mutations in the hairless gene. J Investig Dermatol Symp Proc 4(3):240-3. [PubMed: 10674375]  [MGI Ref ID J:59939]

Astner S; Wu A; Chen J; Philips N; Rius-Diaz F; Parrado C; Mihm MC; Goukassian DA; Pathak MA; Gonzalez S. 2007. Dietary lutein/zeaxanthin partially reduces photoaging and photocarcinogenesis in chronically UVB-irradiated Skh-1 hairless mice. Skin Pharmacol Physiol 20(6):283-91. [PubMed: 17717424]  [MGI Ref ID J:128747]

Bailey DE; Bunker HP. 1973. Spontaneous mutation to hr<rh2J> Mouse News Lett 49:31.  [MGI Ref ID J:27523]

Balansky RM; Izzotti A; D'Agostini F; Camoirano A; Bagnasco M; Lubet RA; De Flora S. 2003. Systemic genotoxic effects produced by light, and synergism with cigarette smoke in the respiratory tract of hairless mice. Carcinogenesis 24(9):1525-32. [PubMed: 12844483]  [MGI Ref ID J:85507]

Batal M; Boudry I; Mouret S; Wartelle J; Emorine S; Bertoni M; Berard I; Clery-Barraud C; Douki T. 2013. Temporal and spatial features of the formation of DNA adducts in sulfur mustard-exposed skin. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 273(3):644-50. [PubMed: 24141030]  [MGI Ref ID J:205209]

Brooke HC. 1926. Hairless mice J Hered 17:173-74.  [MGI Ref ID J:2405]

Brouxhon S; Konger RL; VanBuskirk J; Sheu TJ; Ryan J; Erdle B; Almudevar A; Breyer RM; Scott G; Pentland AP. 2007. Deletion of prostaglandin E2 EP2 receptor protects against ultraviolet-induced carcinogenesis, but increases tumor aggressiveness. J Invest Dermatol 127(2):439-46. [PubMed: 16977324]  [MGI Ref ID J:117581]

Cachon-Gonzalez MB; Fenner S; Coffin JM; Moran C; Best S; Stoye JP. 1994. Structure and expression of the hairless gene of mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 91(16):7717-21. [PubMed: 8052649]  [MGI Ref ID J:19624]

Cachon-Gonzalez MB; San-Jose I; Cano A; Vega JA; Garcia N; Freeman T; Schimmang T; Stoye JP. 1999. The hairless gene of the mouse: relationship of phenotypic effects with expression profile and genotype. Dev Dyn 216(2):113-26. [PubMed: 10536052]  [MGI Ref ID J:57947]

Clark EA; Shultz LD; Pollack SB. 1981. Mutations in mice that influence natural killer (NK) cell activity. Immunogenetics 12(5-6):601-13. [PubMed: 6971254]  [MGI Ref ID J:6485]

Cooper KL; King BS; Sandoval MM; Liu KJ; Hudson LG. 2013. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 269(2):81-8. [PubMed: 23523584]  [MGI Ref ID J:197252]

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Cusumano ZT; Watson ME Jr; Caparon MG. 2014. Streptococcus pyogenes arginine and citrulline catabolism promotes infection and modulates innate immunity. Infect Immun 82(1):233-42. [PubMed: 24144727]  [MGI Ref ID J:206198]

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Doig J; Anderson C; Lawrence NJ; Selfridge J; Brownstein DG; Melton DW. 2006. Mice with skin-specific DNA repair gene (Ercc1) inactivation are hypersensitive to ultraviolet irradiation-induced skin cancer and show more rapid actinic progression. Oncogene 25(47):6229-38. [PubMed: 16682947]  [MGI Ref ID J:115849]

Dunn TB; Deringer MK. 1968. Reticulum cell neoplasm, type B, or the Hodgkin's-like lesion of the mouse. J Natl Cancer Inst 40(4):771-821. [PubMed: 4869134]  [MGI Ref ID J:2417]

Dwivedi C; Valluri HB; Guan X; Agarwal R. 2006. Chemopreventive effects of alpha-santalol on ultraviolet B radiation-induced skin tumor development in SKH-1 hairless mice. Carcinogenesis 27(9):1917-22. [PubMed: 16679309]  [MGI Ref ID J:113353]

Egberts F; Heinrich M; Jensen JM; Winoto-Morbach S; Pfeiffer S; Wickel M; Schunck M; Steude J; Saftig P; Proksch E; Schutze S. 2004. Cathepsin D is involved in the regulation of transglutaminase 1 and epidermal differentiation. J Cell Sci 117(Pt 11):2295-307. [PubMed: 15126630]  [MGI Ref ID J:89747]

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Gilliver SC; Emmerson E; Campbell L; Chambon P; Hardman MJ; Ashcroft GS. 2010. 17Beta-estradiol inhibits wound healing in male mice via estrogen receptor-alpha. Am J Pathol 176(6):2707-21. [PubMed: 20448060]  [MGI Ref ID J:161321]

Hachem JP; Houben E; Crumrine D; Man MQ; Schurer N; Roelandt T; Choi EH; Uchida Y; Brown BE; Feingold KR; Elias PM. 2006. Serine Protease Signaling of Epidermal Permeability Barrier Homeostasis. J Invest Dermatol 126(9):2074-2086. [PubMed: 16691196]  [MGI Ref ID J:111734]

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Panteleyev AA; Botchkareva NV; Sundberg JP; Christiano AM; Paus R. 1999. The role of the hairless (hr) gene in the regulation of hair follicle catagen transformation. Am J Pathol 155(1):159-71. [PubMed: 10393848]  [MGI Ref ID J:56076]

Panteleyev AA; van der Veen C; Rosenbach T; Muller-Rover S; Sokolov VE ; Paus R. 1998. Towards defining the pathogenesis of the hairless phenotype. J Invest Dermatol 110(6):902-7. [PubMed: 9620297]  [MGI Ref ID J:47743]

Pauling L. 1991. Effect of ascorbic acid on incidence of spontaneous mammary tumors and UV-light-induced skin tumors in mice. Am J Clin Nutr 54(6 Suppl):1252S-1255S. [PubMed: 1962578]  [MGI Ref ID J:634]

Pirinen E; Kuulasmaa T; Pietila M; Heikkinen S; Tusa M; Itkonen P; Boman S; Skommer J; Virkamaki A; Hohtola E; Kettunen M; Fatrai S; Kansanen E; Koota S; Niiranen K; Parkkinen J; Levonen AL; Yla-Herttuala S; Hiltunen JK; Alhonen L; Smith U; Janne J; Laakso M. 2007. Enhanced polyamine catabolism alters homeostatic control of white adipose tissue mass, energy expenditure, and glucose metabolism. Mol Cell Biol 27(13):4953-67. [PubMed: 17485446]  [MGI Ref ID J:122759]

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Rodriguez-Martin M; Martin-Ezquerra G; Man MQ; Hupe M; Youm JK; Mackenzie DS; Cho S; Trullas C; Holleran WM; Radek KA; Elias PM. 2011. Expression of epidermal CAMP changes in parallel with permeability barrier status. J Invest Dermatol 131(11):2263-70. [PubMed: 21796152]  [MGI Ref ID J:182180]

Roelandt T; Giddelo C; Heughebaert C; Denecker G; Hupe M; Crumrine D; Kusuma A; Haftek M; Roseeuw D; Declercq W; Feingold KR; Elias PM; Hachem JP. 2009. The 'caveolae brake hypothesis' and the epidermal barrier. J Invest Dermatol 129(4):927-36. [PubMed: 19005485]  [MGI Ref ID J:150227]

Sahu RP; Dasilva SC; Rashid B; Martel KC; Jernigan D; Mehta SR; Mohamed DR; Rezania S; Bradish JR; Armstrong AB; Warren S; Konger RL. 2012. Mice lacking epidermal PPARgamma exhibit a marked augmentation in photocarcinogenesis associated with increased UVB-induced apoptosis, inflammation and barrier dysfunction. Int J Cancer 131(7):E1055-66. [PubMed: 22467332]  [MGI Ref ID J:186081]

Sand JM; Aziz MH; Dreckschmidt NE; Havighurst TC; Kim K; Oberley TD; Verma AK. 2010. PKCepsilon overexpression, irrespective of genetic background, sensitizes skin to UVR-induced development of squamous-cell carcinomas. J Invest Dermatol 130(1):270-7. [PubMed: 19626035]  [MGI Ref ID J:159584]

Sato J; Yanai M; Hirao T; Denda M. 2000. Water content and thickness of the stratum corneum contribute to skin surface morphology. Arch Dermatol Res 292(8):412-7. [PubMed: 10994776]  [MGI Ref ID J:116955]

Siebert N; Xu W; Grambow E; Zechner D; Vollmar B. 2011. Erythropoietin improves skin wound healing and activates the TGF-beta signaling pathway. Lab Invest 91(12):1753-65. [PubMed: 21894148]  [MGI Ref ID J:180037]

Sitaru C; Chiriac MT; Mihai S; Buning J; Gebert A; Ishiko A; Zillikens D. 2006. Induction of complement-fixing autoantibodies against type VII collagen results in subepidermal blistering in mice. J Immunol 177(5):3461-8. [PubMed: 16920988]  [MGI Ref ID J:139521]

Staats J. 1985. Standardized Nomenclature for Inbred Strains of Mice: eighth listing. Cancer Res 45(3):945-77. [PubMed: 3971387]  [MGI Ref ID J:50296]

Starcher B; O'Neal P; Granstein RD; Beissert S. 1996. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase suppresses the development of skin tumors in hairless mice. J Invest Dermatol 107(2):159-63. [PubMed: 8757756]  [MGI Ref ID J:34446]

Stelzner KF. 1983. Four dominant autosomal mutations affecting skin and hair development in the mouse. J Hered 74(3):193-6. [PubMed: 6863894]  [MGI Ref ID J:7103]

Stoye JP; Fenner S; Greenoak GE; Moran C; Coffin JM. 1988. Role of endogenous retroviruses as mutagens: the hairless mutation of mice. Cell 54(3):383-91. [PubMed: 2840205]  [MGI Ref ID J:9252]

Sundberg JP (ed.). 1994. Handbook of Mouse Mutations with Skin and Hair Abnormalities: Animal Models and Biomedical Tools. In: Handbook of Mouse Mutations with Skin and Hair Abnormalities: Animal Models and Biomedical Tools. CRC Press, Boca Raton.  [MGI Ref ID J:30359]

Sundberg JP; Sundberg BA; Beamer WG. 1997. Comparison of chemical carcinogen skin tumor induction efficacy in inbred, mutant, and hybrid strains of mice: Morphologic variations of induced tumors and absence of a papillomavirus cocarcinogen. Mol Carcinog 20(1):19-32. [PubMed: 9328433]  [MGI Ref ID J:43880]

Suzu S; Tanaka-Douzono M; Nomaguchi K; Yamada M; Hayasawa H; Kimura F; Motoyoshi K. 2000. p56(dok-2) as a cytokine-inducible inhibitor of cell proliferation and signal transduction. EMBO J 19(19):5114-22. [PubMed: 11013214]  [MGI Ref ID J:150402]

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Tober KL; Thomas-Ahner JM; Kusewitt DF; Oberyszyn TM. 2007. Effects of UVB on E prostanoid receptor expression in murine skin. J Invest Dermatol 127(1):214-21. [PubMed: 16917495]  [MGI Ref ID J:116974]

Tsukahara K; Kakuo S; Moriwaki S; Hotta M; Ohuchi A; Kitahara T; Harada N. 2008. The characteristics of aromatase deficient hairless mice indicate important roles of extragonadal estrogen in the skin. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 108(1-2):82-90. [PubMed: 17951050]  [MGI Ref ID J:130515]

Vollmar B; Morgenthaler M; Amon M; Menger MD. 2000. Skin microvascular adaptations during maturation and aging of hairless mice Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 279(4):H1591-9. [PubMed: 11009445]  [MGI Ref ID J:65226]

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Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3175.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.
    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 11 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice
    Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $4127.50
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.
    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 11 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice
    Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

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Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


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The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
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phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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