Strain Name:

B6.129S4-Bdnftm1Jae/J

Stock Number:

002266

Order this mouse

Availability:

Repository- Live

Use Restrictions Apply, see Terms of Use
Mice homozygous for the Bdnf knock-out show degeneration in sensory ganglia, and may be useful in studies of neurotrophic factor defects, hearing defects, and nociception.

Description

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Mating System+/+ sibling x Heterozygote         (Female x Male)   01-MAR-06
Specieslaboratory mouse
Background Strain C57BL/6
Donor Strain 129S4 via J1 ES cell line
GenerationN6F35 (07-AUG-14)
Generation Definitions
 
Donating Investigator IMR Colony,   The Jackson Laboratory

Description
Mice heterozygous for the Bdnftm1Jae mutation show about half normal levels of Bdnf mRNA, but appear normal. Mice homozygous for the Bdnftm1Jae mutation are smaller than normal siblings and most die within the second postnatal week. They have defective coordination of movements and balance. They also exhibit head bobbing and spinning during periods of hyperactivity. There are rare survivors to adulthood. There is excessive degeneration in all sensory ganglia examined, including the vestibular ganglion. Motor neurons are not affected. BDNF can prevent death of central motor neurons and other neurons in vitro, but does not affect these in vivo.

Control Information

  Control
   Wild-type from the colony
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying   Bdnftm1Jae allele
002267   STOCK Bdnftm1Jae/J
View Strains carrying   Bdnftm1Jae     (1 strain)

Strains carrying other alleles of Bdnf
021055   B6.129S2(Cg)-Bdnftm1Krj/J
004339   STOCK Bdnftm3Jae/J
View Strains carrying other alleles of Bdnf     (2 strains)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
- Potential model based on gene homology relationships. Phenotypic similarity to the human disease has not been tested.
Bulimia Nervosa, Susceptibility to, 1; BULN1   (BDNF)
Bulimia Nervosa, Susceptibility to, 2; BULN2   (BDNF)
Central Hypoventilation Syndrome, Congenital; CCHS   (BDNF)
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder; OCD   (BDNF)
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Bdnftm1Jae/Bdnftm1Jae

        involves: 129S4/SvJae
  • mortality/aging
  • partial postnatal lethality   (MGI Ref ID J:82462)
    • most homozygotes die in the second postnatal week, with rare survivors achieving adult stages   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • circling   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
  • head bobbing   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
  • head tilt   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
  • hyperactivity   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
  • impaired balance   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
  • impaired limb coordination   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
  • spinning   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • abnormal fungiform papillae morphology
    • loss of fungiform papillae is seen in 2 week old mutants and remaining papillae are smaller   (MGI Ref ID J:82462)
  • decreased body size
    • mice are reduced in size compared to control littermates   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • *normal* nervous system phenotype
    • no differences are seen in the morphology of the central and peripheral nerve processes from the trigeminal, geniculate, petrose and nodose ganglia at E10.5-11.5   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
    • abnormal cochlear ganglion morphology
      • loss of spiral ganglion neurons by 25% at P0 and 29% at P17 in the cochlea   (MGI Ref ID J:82462)
    • abnormal innervation
      • ampullar cristae completely lack innervation   (MGI Ref ID J:82462)
      • abnormal sensory neuron innervation pattern
        • loss of outer hair cell innervation in the apex, middle and basal turns of the cochlea   (MGI Ref ID J:82462)
    • abnormal trigeminal nerve morphology
      • mice exhibit a 43% loss of trigeminal neurons at birth   (MGI Ref ID J:123022)
    • abnormal type I vestibular cell
      • no nerve chalicies are found associated with type I hair cells of the vestibule   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
    • abnormal vestibular ganglion morphology
      • in co-cultures of wild-type vestibular ganglion neurons with mutant hair cells, very few (2 of 200) wild-type neurons contact a mutant hair cell and diameter of the nerve fiber is thinner and shows less branching on the surface of the mutant hair cell than seen in all wild-type cultures   (MGI Ref ID J:82462)
      • small vestibular ganglion
        • approximately 75% of the neurons are lost from the vestibular ganglion at E18.5   (MGI Ref ID J:25566)
        • approximately 80% of the neurons are lost from the vestibular ganglion at P14-16   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
        • vestibular neurons appear atrophic   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
    • abnormal vestibular nerve morphology
      • innervation of the vestibular compartment of the inner ear is severely compromised   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
      • only small fiber bundles enter the saccule, utricle and ampulla of the semicircular ducts compared to controls; the remaining fibers terminate in the connective tissue adjacent to the sensory epithelia of the saccule, utricle and cristae of the semicurcular ducts   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
      • no nerve chalicies are found associated with type I hair cells of the vestibule   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
    • decreased sensory neuron number
      • significant loss of all sensory neuron types in the nodose-petrosal, geniculate and vestibular ganglia in homozygous mice   (MGI Ref ID J:25566)
      • no difference in the number of facial motor neurons is seen compared to controls   (MGI Ref ID J:25566)
      • the numbers of neurons in many sensory ganglia are reduced compared to controls   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
      • the number of facial motor neurons and sympathetic superior cervical ganglion neurons is not different from controls   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
    • increased neuron apoptosis
      • at E12 and E14, neuron apoptosis is increased 143% and 155%, respectively, compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:123022)
    • small L4 dorsal root ganglion   (MGI Ref ID J:82462)
      • approximately 30% of the neurons are lost from the L4 DRG at P14-16   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
    • small geniculate ganglion   (MGI Ref ID J:82462)
      • approximately half of the neurons are lost from the geniculate ganglion at E18.5   (MGI Ref ID J:25566)
    • small mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus
      • approximately half of the neurons are lost from the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus at P14-16   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
    • small nodose ganglion   (MGI Ref ID J:82462)
      • greater than half of the neurons are lost from the nodose-petrosal ganglion at E18.5   (MGI Ref ID J:25566)
      • approximately 65% of the neurons are lost from the nodose ganglion at P14-16   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
    • small petrosal ganglion
      • greater than half of the neurons are lost from the nodose-petrosal ganglion at E18.5   (MGI Ref ID J:25566)
    • small trigeminal ganglion
      • approximately half of the neurons are lost from the trigeminal ganglion at P14-16   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
  • hearing/vestibular/ear phenotype
  • *normal* hearing/vestibular/ear phenotype
    • despite abnormal innervation of the vestibular compartment, the structural integrity of the organ of Corti, macula of the saccula and utricle, and the cristae of the semicircular ducts appear similar to controls   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
    • innervation of the cochlear inner and outer hair cells appears similar to controls   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
    • mice respond to auditory stimuli   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
    • abnormal crista ampullaris morphology
      • ampullar cristae completely lack innervation   (MGI Ref ID J:82462)
    • abnormal type I vestibular cell
      • no nerve chalicies are found associated with type I hair cells of the vestibule   (MGI Ref ID J:17123)
    • deafness
      • loss of hearing   (MGI Ref ID J:82462)
  • digestive/alimentary phenotype
  • abnormal fungiform papillae morphology
    • loss of fungiform papillae is seen in 2 week old mutants and remaining papillae are smaller   (MGI Ref ID J:82462)
  • craniofacial phenotype
  • abnormal fungiform papillae morphology
    • loss of fungiform papillae is seen in 2 week old mutants and remaining papillae are smaller   (MGI Ref ID J:82462)
  • cellular phenotype
  • increased neuron apoptosis
    • at E12 and E14, neuron apoptosis is increased 143% and 155%, respectively, compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:123022)

Bdnftm1Jae/Bdnftm1Jae

        B6.129S4-Bdnftm1Jae
  • taste/olfaction phenotype
  • abnormal gustatory papillae taste bud morphology
    • at P7 homozygous mice have 79% fewer vallate taste buds than wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:90280)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal sensory neuron innervation pattern
    • innervation of the fungiform papillae is reduced with a shortfall in the geniculate ganglion neurons that supply taste neurons to the fungiform papillae   (MGI Ref ID J:90280)

Bdnftm1Jae/Bdnftm1Jae

        involves: 129S4/SvJae * BALB/c
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal neuron apoptosis
    • sympathetic neuron apoptosis is developmentally delayed   (MGI Ref ID J:46125)
    • cell death in culture following the withdrawal of NGF is delayed   (MGI Ref ID J:46125)
  • abnormal neuron morphology
    • mice exhibit an increased in sympathetic neuron number (21 318+/-1 627 compared to 15 690+/-617 in wild-type mice) and size   (MGI Ref ID J:46125)
    • increased neuron number   (MGI Ref ID J:46125)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal neuron apoptosis
    • sympathetic neuron apoptosis is developmentally delayed   (MGI Ref ID J:46125)
    • cell death in culture following the withdrawal of NGF is delayed   (MGI Ref ID J:46125)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Sensorineural Research
Nociception

Bdnftm1Jae related

Apoptosis Research
Extracellular Modulators

Neurobiology Research
Hearing Defects
Neurotrophic Factor Defects

Sensorineural Research
Hearing Defects

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Bdnftm1Jae
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Rudolf Jaenisch
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Common Name(s) BDNF-KO; BDNF-;
Mutation Made ByDr. Rudolf Jaenisch,   Whitehead Institute (MIT)
Strain of Origin129S4/SvJae
ES Cell Line NameJ1
ES Cell Line Strain129S4/SvJae
Gene Symbol and Name Bdnf, brain derived neurotrophic factor
Chromosome 2
Gene Common Name(s) ANON2; BULN2;
Molecular Note A part of exon 5 of the gene was deleted and replaced by a neomycin cassette. This deletion left 49 and 30 amino acids in the N and C termini, respectively. Northern blot analysis on RNA derived from cerebral cortex showed that no detectable transcriptis expressed from this allele. [MGI Ref ID J:17123]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Bdnftm1Jae, Melt Curve Analysis
Bdnftm1Jae, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Ernfors P; Lee KF; Jaenisch R. 1994. Mice lacking brain-derived neurotrophic factor develop with sensory deficits. Nature 368(6467):147-50. [PubMed: 8139657]  [MGI Ref ID J:17123]

Additional References

Alkhamrah BA; Hoshino N; Kawano Y; Harada F; Hanada K; Maeda T. 2003. The periodontal Ruffini endings in brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) deficient mice. Arch Histol Cytol 66(1):73-81. [PubMed: 12703556]  [MGI Ref ID J:83509]

Carter AR; Berry EM; Segal RA. 2003. Regional expression of p75NTR contributes to neurotrophin regulation of cerebellar patterning. Mol Cell Neurosci 22(1):1-13. [PubMed: 12595234]  [MGI Ref ID J:82192]

Chourbaji S; Hellweg R; Brandis D; Zorner B; Zacher C; Lang UE; Henn FA; Hortnagl H; Gass P. 2004. Mice with reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression show decreased choline acetyltransferase activity, but regular brain monoamine levels and unaltered emotional behavior. Brain Res Mol Brain Res 121(1-2):28-36. [PubMed: 14969734]  [MGI Ref ID J:88037]

Jourdi H; Iwakura Y; Narisawa-Saito M; Ibaraki K; Xiong H; Watanabe M; Hayashi Y; Takei N; Nawa H. 2003. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal enhances and maintains the expression of AMPA receptor-associated PDZ proteins in developing cortical neurons. Dev Biol 263(2):216-30. [PubMed: 14597197]  [MGI Ref ID J:86443]

Okayasu I; Yamada Y; Maeda T; Yoshida N; Koga Y; Oi K. 2004. The involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pattern generator of mastication. Brain Res 1016(1):40-7. [PubMed: 15234250]  [MGI Ref ID J:91229]

Bdnftm1Jae related

Agerman K; Baudet C; Fundin B; Willson C; Ernfors P. 2000. Attenuation of a caspase-3 dependent cell death in NT4- and p75-deficient embryonic sensory neurons. Mol Cell Neurosci 16(3):258-68. [PubMed: 10995552]  [MGI Ref ID J:123022]

Agerman K; Hjerling-Leffler J; Blanchard MP; Scarfone E; Canlon B; Nosrat C; Ernfors P. 2003. BDNF gene replacement reveals multiple mechanisms for establishing neurotrophin specificity during sensory nervous system development. Development 130(8):1479-91. [PubMed: 12620975]  [MGI Ref ID J:82462]

Alkhamrah BA; Hoshino N; Kawano Y; Harada F; Hanada K; Maeda T. 2003. The periodontal Ruffini endings in brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) deficient mice. Arch Histol Cytol 66(1):73-81. [PubMed: 12703556]  [MGI Ref ID J:83509]

Asztely F; Kokaia M; Olofsdotter K; Ortegren U; Lindvall O. 2000. Afferent-specific modulation of short-term synaptic plasticity by neurotrophins in dentate gyrus. Eur J Neurosci 12(2):662-9. [PubMed: 10712646]  [MGI Ref ID J:108125]

Baker SA; Stanford LE; Brown RE; Hagg T. 2005. Maturation but not survival of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons is affected in developing and aging BDNF-deficient mice. Brain Res 1039(1-2):177-88. [PubMed: 15781060]  [MGI Ref ID J:97459]

Bamji SX; Majdan M; Pozniak CD; Belliveau DJ; Aloyz R; Kohn J; Causing CG; Miller FD. 1998. The p75 neurotrophin receptor mediates neuronal apoptosis and is essential for naturally occurring sympathetic neuron death. J Cell Biol 140(4):911-23. [PubMed: 9472042]  [MGI Ref ID J:46125]

Barco A; Patterson S; Alarcon JM; Gromova P; Mata-Roig M; Morozov A; Kandel ER. 2005. Gene expression profiling of facilitated L-LTP in VP16-CREB mice reveals that BDNF is critical for the maintenance of LTP and its synaptic capture. Neuron 48(1):123-37. [PubMed: 16202713]  [MGI Ref ID J:105355]

Barton ME; Shannon HE. 2005. The seizure-related phenotype of brain-derived neurotrophic factor knockdown mice. Neuroscience 136(2):563-9. [PubMed: 16198489]  [MGI Ref ID J:104591]

Bath KG; Mandairon N; Jing D; Rajagopal R; Kapoor R; Chen ZY; Khan T; Proenca CC; Kraemer R; Cleland TA; Hempstead BL; Chao MV; Lee FS. 2008. Variant brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Val66Met) alters adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis and spontaneous olfactory discrimination. J Neurosci 28(10):2383-93. [PubMed: 18322085]  [MGI Ref ID J:132776]

Betley JN; Wright CV; Kawaguchi Y; Erdelyi F; Szabo G; Jessell TM; Kaltschmidt JA. 2009. Stringent specificity in the construction of a GABAergic presynaptic inhibitory circuit. Cell 139(1):161-74. [PubMed: 19804761]  [MGI Ref ID J:157313]

Borghesani PR; Peyrin JM; Klein R; Rubin J; Carter AR; Schwartz PM; Luster A; Corfas G; Segal RA. 2002. BDNF stimulates migration of cerebellar granule cells. Development 129(6):1435-42. [PubMed: 11880352]  [MGI Ref ID J:75046]

Bosse KE; Maina FK; Birbeck JA; France MM; Roberts JJ; Colombo ML; Mathews TA. 2012. Aberrant striatal dopamine transmitter dynamics in brain-derived neurotrophic factor-deficient mice. J Neurochem 120(3):385-95. [PubMed: 21988371]  [MGI Ref ID J:182646]

Canals JM; Pineda JR; Torres-Peraza JF; Bosch M; Martin-Ibanez R; Munoz MT; Mengod G; Ernfors P; Alberch J. 2004. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates the onset and severity of motor dysfunction associated with enkephalinergic neuronal degeneration in Huntington's disease. J Neurosci 24(35):7727-39. [PubMed: 15342740]  [MGI Ref ID J:92634]

Cao L; Dhilla A; Mukai J; Blazeski R; Lodovichi C; Mason CA; Gogos JA. 2007. Genetic modulation of BDNF signaling affects the outcome of axonal competition in vivo. Curr Biol 17(11):911-21. [PubMed: 17493809]  [MGI Ref ID J:124050]

Carola V; Gross C. 2010. BDNF moderates early environmental risk factors for anxiety in mouse. Genes Brain Behav 9(4):379-89. [PubMed: 20132316]  [MGI Ref ID J:172708]

Carreton O; Giralt A; Torres-Peraza JF; Brito V; Lucas JJ; Gines S; Canals JM; Alberch J. 2012. Age-dependent decline of motor neocortex but not hippocampal performance in heterozygous BDNF mice correlates with a decrease of cortical PSD-95 but an increase of hippocampal TrkB levels. Exp Neurol 237(2):335-45. [PubMed: 22776425]  [MGI Ref ID J:192395]

Carter AR; Berry EM; Segal RA. 2003. Regional expression of p75NTR contributes to neurotrophin regulation of cerebellar patterning. Mol Cell Neurosci 22(1):1-13. [PubMed: 12595234]  [MGI Ref ID J:82192]

Carter AR; Chen C; Schwartz PM; Segal RA. 2002. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates cerebellar plasticity and synaptic ultrastructure. J Neurosci 22(4):1316-27. [PubMed: 11850459]  [MGI Ref ID J:74586]

Castello NA; Green KN; LaFerla FM. 2012. Genetic knockdown of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in 3xTg-AD mice does not alter Abeta or tau pathology. PLoS One 7(8):e39566. [PubMed: 22870188]  [MGI Ref ID J:189666]

Causing CG; Gloster A; Aloyz R; Bamji SX; Chang E; Fawcett J; Kuchel G; Miller FD. 1997. Synaptic innervation density is regulated by neuron-derived BDNF. Neuron 18(2):257-67. [PubMed: 9052796]  [MGI Ref ID J:127889]

Chourbaji S; Brandwein C; Vogt MA; Dormann C; Hellweg R; Gass P. 2008. Nature vs. nurture: Can enrichment rescue the behavioural phenotype of BDNF heterozygous mice? Behav Brain Res 192(2):254-8. [PubMed: 18538870]  [MGI Ref ID J:137632]

Chourbaji S; Hellweg R; Brandis D; Zorner B; Zacher C; Lang UE; Henn FA; Hortnagl H; Gass P. 2004. Mice with reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression show decreased choline acetyltransferase activity, but regular brain monoamine levels and unaltered emotional behavior. Brain Res Mol Brain Res 121(1-2):28-36. [PubMed: 14969734]  [MGI Ref ID J:88037]

Chourbaji S; Hortnagl H; Molteni R; Riva MA; Gass P; Hellweg R. 2012. The impact of environmental enrichment on sex-specific neurochemical circuitries Neuroscience 220:267-76. [PubMed: 22710068]  [MGI Ref ID J:192519]

Clow C; Jasmin BJ. 2010. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates satellite cell differentiation and skeltal muscle regeneration. Mol Biol Cell 21(13):2182-90. [PubMed: 20427568]  [MGI Ref ID J:165062]

Cooper D; Oakley B. 1998. Functional redundancy and gustatory development in bdnf null mutant mice. Brain Res Dev Brain Res 105(1):79-84. [PubMed: 9497082]  [MGI Ref ID J:45553]

Daws LC; Munn JL; Valdez MF; Frosto-Burke T; Hensler JG. 2007. Serotonin transporter function, but not expression, is dependent on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF): in vivo studies in BDNF-deficient mice. J Neurochem 101(3):641-51. [PubMed: 17254018]  [MGI Ref ID J:121235]

Djalali S; Holtje M; Grosse G; Rothe T; Stroh T; Grosse J; Deng DR; Hellweg R; Grantyn R; Hortnagl H; Ahnert-Hilger G. 2005. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on glial cells and serotonergic neurones during development. J Neurochem 92(3):616-27. [PubMed: 15659231]  [MGI Ref ID J:96205]

Dluzen DE. 2004. The effect of gender and the neurotrophin, BDNF, upon methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in mice. Neurosci Lett 359(3):135-8. [PubMed: 15050682]  [MGI Ref ID J:131485]

Dluzen DE; Gao X; Story GM; Anderson LI; Kucera J; Walro JM. 2001. Evaluation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in adult +/+ and +/- BDNF mutant mice. Exp Neurol 170(1):121-8. [PubMed: 11421589]  [MGI Ref ID J:70481]

Dluzen DE; McDermott JL; Anderson LI; Kucera J; Joyce JN; Osredkar T; Walro JM. 2004. Age-related changes in nigrostriatal dopaminergic function are accentuated in +/- brain-derived neurotrophic factor mice. Neuroscience 128(1):201-8. [PubMed: 15450367]  [MGI Ref ID J:93611]

Dluzen DE; Story GM; Xu K; Kucera J; Walro JM. 1999. Alterations in nigrostriatal dopaminergic function within BDNF mutant mice. Exp Neurol 160(2):500-7. [PubMed: 10619567]  [MGI Ref ID J:58936]

Donovan MJ; Lin MI; Wiegn P; Ringstedt T; Kraemer R; Hahn R; Wang S; Ibanez CF; Rafii S; Hempstead BL. 2000. Brain derived neurotrophic factor is an endothelial cell survival factor required for intramyocardial vessel stabilization Development 127(21):4531-40. [PubMed: 11023857]  [MGI Ref ID J:64681]

Duman CH; Schlesinger L; Russell DS; Duman RS. 2008. Voluntary exercise produces antidepressant and anxiolytic behavioral effects in mice. Brain Res 1199:148-58. [PubMed: 18267317]  [MGI Ref ID J:133331]

ElShamy WM; Ernfors P. 1997. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3, and neurotrophin-4 complement and cooperate with each other sequentially during visceral neuron development. J Neurosci 17(22):8667-75. [PubMed: 9348335]  [MGI Ref ID J:44086]

Endres M; Fan G; Hirt L; Fujii M; Matsushita K; Liu X; Jaenisch R; Moskowitz MA. 2000. Ischemic brain damage in mice after selectively modifying BDNF or NT4 gene expression. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 20(1):139-44. [PubMed: 10616802]  [MGI Ref ID J:60087]

English AW; Meador W; Carrasco DI. 2005. Neurotrophin-4/5 is required for the early growth of regenerating axons in peripheral nerves. Eur J Neurosci 21(10):2624-34. [PubMed: 15926911]  [MGI Ref ID J:101068]

Ernfors P; Kucera J; Lee KF; Loring J; Jaenisch R. 1995. Studies on the physiological role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 in knockout mice. Int J Dev Biol 39(5):799-807. [PubMed: 8645564]  [MGI Ref ID J:31400]

Ernfors P; Van De Water T; Loring J; Jaenisch R. 1995. Complementary roles of BDNF and NT-3 in vestibular and auditory development. Neuron 14(6):1153-64. [PubMed: 7605630]  [MGI Ref ID J:26749]

Fan G; Copray S; Huang EJ; Jones K; Yan Q; Walro J; Jaenisch R; Kucera J. 2000. Formation of a full complement of cranial proprioceptors requires multiple neurotrophins. Dev Dyn 218(2):359-70. [PubMed: 10842362]  [MGI Ref ID J:62766]

Fan L; Girnius S; Oakley B. 2004. Support of trigeminal sensory neurons by nonneuronal p75 neurotrophin receptors. Brain Res Dev Brain Res 150(1):23-39. [PubMed: 15126035]  [MGI Ref ID J:90280]

Fei D; Krimm RF. 2013. Taste neurons consist of both a large TrkB-receptor-dependent and a small TrkB-receptor-independent subpopulation. PLoS One 8(12):e83460. [PubMed: 24386206]  [MGI Ref ID J:209845]

Fiorentino H; Kuczewski N; Diabira D; Ferrand N; Pangalos MN; Porcher C; Gaiarsa JL. 2009. GABA(B) receptor activation triggers BDNF release and promotes the maturation of GABAergic synapses. J Neurosci 29(37):11650-61. [PubMed: 19759312]  [MGI Ref ID J:152758]

Fox EA; Biddinger JE; Jones KR; McAdams J; Worman A. 2013. Mechanism of hyperphagia contributing to obesity in brain-derived neurotrophic factor knockout mice. Neuroscience 229:176-99. [PubMed: 23069761]  [MGI Ref ID J:193539]

Fox EA; Byerly MS. 2004. A mechanism underlying mature-onset obesity: evidence from the hyperphagic phenotype of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mutants. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 286(6):R994-1004. [PubMed: 15142855]  [MGI Ref ID J:109376]

Fundin BT; Silos-Santiago I; Ernfors P; Fagan AM; Aldskogius H ; DeChiara TM ; Phillips HS ; Barbacid M ; Yancopoulos GD ; Rice FL. 1997. Differential dependency of cutaneous mechanoreceptors on neurotrophins, trk receptors, and P75 LNGFR. Dev Biol 190(1):94-116. [PubMed: 9331334]  [MGI Ref ID J:43425]

Gacek RR; Khetarpal U. 1998. Neurotrophin 3, not brain-derived neurotrophic factor or neurotrophin 4, knockout mice have delay in vestibular compensation after unilateral labyrinthectomy. Laryngoscope 108(5):671-8. [PubMed: 9591544]  [MGI Ref ID J:113175]

Genoud C; Knott GW; Sakata K; Lu B; Welker E. 2004. Altered synapse formation in the adult somatosensory cortex of brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygote mice. J Neurosci 24(10):2394-400. [PubMed: 15014114]  [MGI Ref ID J:97009]

Gerecke KM; Jiao Y; Pagala V; Smeyne RJ. 2012. Exercise does not protect against MPTP-induced neurotoxicity in BDNF happloinsufficent mice. PLoS One 7(8):e43250. [PubMed: 22912838]  [MGI Ref ID J:190061]

Gines S; Bosch M; Marco S; Gavalda N; Diaz-Hernandez M; Lucas JJ; Canals JM; Alberch J. 2006. Reduced expression of the TrkB receptor in Huntington's disease mouse models and in human brain. Eur J Neurosci 23(3):649-58. [PubMed: 16487146]  [MGI Ref ID J:107146]

Giralt A; Rodrigo T; Martin ED; Gonzalez JR; Mila M; Cena V; Dierssen M; Canals JM; Alberch J. 2009. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates the severity of cognitive alterations induced by mutant huntingtin: involvement of phospholipaseCgamma activity and glutamate receptor expression. Neuroscience 158(4):1234-50. [PubMed: 19121372]  [MGI Ref ID J:148973]

Grosse G; Djalali S; Deng DR; Holtje M; Hinz B; Schwartzkopff K; Cygon M; Rothe T; Stroh T; Hellweg R; Ahnert-Hilger G; Hortnag H. 2005. Area-specific effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genetic ablation on various neuronal subtypes of the mouse brain. Brain Res Dev Brain Res 156(2):111-26. [PubMed: 16099299]  [MGI Ref ID J:99374]

Hall FS; Drgonova J; Goeb M; Uhl GR. 2003. Reduced behavioral effects of cocaine in heterozygous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) knockout mice. Neuropsychopharmacology 28(8):1485-90. [PubMed: 12784114]  [MGI Ref ID J:106206]

Harada C; Harada T; Quah HM; Namekata K; Yoshida K; Ohno S; Tanaka K; Parada LF. 2005. Role of neurotrophin-4/5 in neural cell death during retinal development and ischemic retinal injury in vivo. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 46(2):669-73. [PubMed: 15671298]  [MGI Ref ID J:104963]

Henneberger C; Juttner R; Rothe T; Grantyn R. 2002. Postsynaptic action of BDNF on GABAergic synaptic transmission in the superficial layers of the mouse superior colliculus. J Neurophysiol 88(2):595-603. [PubMed: 12163512]  [MGI Ref ID J:103288]

Henneberger C; Juttner R; Schmidt SA; Walter J; Meier JC; Rothe T; Grantyn R. 2005. GluR- and TrkB-mediated maturation of GABA receptor function during the period of eye opening. Eur J Neurosci 21(2):431-40. [PubMed: 15673442]  [MGI Ref ID J:100813]

Hill RA; van den Buuse M. 2011. Sex-dependent and region-specific changes in TrkB signaling in BDNF heterozygous mice. Brain Res 1384:51-60. [PubMed: 21281620]  [MGI Ref ID J:170105]

Hoshino N; Harada F; Alkhamrah BA; Aita M; Kawano Y; Hanada K; Maeda T. 2003. Involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the development of periodontal Ruffini endings. Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 274(1):807-16. [PubMed: 12923891]  [MGI Ref ID J:106012]

Huang T; Krimm RF. 2014. BDNF and NT4 play interchangeable roles in gustatory development. Dev Biol 386(2):308-20. [PubMed: 24378336]  [MGI Ref ID J:206879]

Huang T; Krimm RF. 2010. Developmental expression of Bdnf, Ntf4/5, and TrkB in the mouse peripheral taste system. Dev Dyn 239(10):2637-46. [PubMed: 21038447]  [MGI Ref ID J:165547]

Huang YZ; Pan E; Xiong ZQ; McNamara JO. 2008. Zinc-mediated transactivation of TrkB potentiates the hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 pyramid synapse. Neuron 57(4):546-58. [PubMed: 18304484]  [MGI Ref ID J:135687]

Ito A; Nosrat IV; Nosrat CA. 2010. Taste cell formation does not require gustatory and somatosensory innervation. Neurosci Lett 471(3):189-94. [PubMed: 20109530]  [MGI Ref ID J:158521]

Jahed A; Kawaja MD. 2005. The influences of p75 neurotrophin receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the sympathetic innervation of target tissues during murine postnatal development. Auton Neurosci 118(1-2):32-42. [PubMed: 15795176]  [MGI Ref ID J:101883]

Javeri S; Rodi M; Tary-Lehmann M; Lehmann PV; Addicks K; Kuerten S. 2010. Involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in MP4-induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Clin Immunol 137(2):181-9. [PubMed: 20797911]  [MGI Ref ID J:168437]

Je HS; Yang F; Ji Y; Potluri S; Fu XQ; Luo ZG; Nagappan G; Chan JP; Hempstead B; Son YJ; Lu B. 2013. ProBDNF and mature BDNF as punishment and reward signals for synapse elimination at mouse neuromuscular junctions. J Neurosci 33(24):9957-62. [PubMed: 23761891]  [MGI Ref ID J:199166]

Jourdi H; Iwakura Y; Narisawa-Saito M; Ibaraki K; Xiong H; Watanabe M; Hayashi Y; Takei N; Nawa H. 2003. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal enhances and maintains the expression of AMPA receptor-associated PDZ proteins in developing cortical neurons. Dev Biol 263(2):216-30. [PubMed: 14597197]  [MGI Ref ID J:86443]

Kim KS; Kim H; Park SK; Han PL. 2012. The dorsal striatum expressing adenylyl cyclase-5 controls behavioral sensitivity of the righting reflex to high-dose ethanol. Brain Res 1489:27-36. [PubMed: 23063718]  [MGI Ref ID J:193552]

Kohn J; Aloyz RS; Toma JG; Haak-Frendscho M; Miller FD. 1999. Functionally antagonistic interactions between the TrkA and p75 neurotrophin receptors regulate sympathetic neuron growth and target innervation. J Neurosci 19(13):5393-408. [PubMed: 10377349]  [MGI Ref ID J:120561]

Koizumi H; Hashimoto K; Iyo M. 2006. Dietary restriction changes behaviours in brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice: role of serotonergic system. Eur J Neurosci 24(8):2335-44. [PubMed: 17074054]  [MGI Ref ID J:117120]

Kokaia M; Ernfors P; Kokaia Z; Elmer E; Jaenisch R; Lindvall O. 1995. Suppressed epileptogenesis in BDNF mutant mice. Exp Neurol 133(2):215-24. [PubMed: 7649227]  [MGI Ref ID J:28137]

Kondo M; Takei Y; Hirokawa N. 2012. Motor protein KIF1A is essential for hippocampal synaptogenesis and learning enhancement in an enriched environment. Neuron 73(4):743-57. [PubMed: 22365548]  [MGI Ref ID J:182702]

Kwapiszewska G; Chwalek K; Marsh LM; Wygrecka M; Wilhelm J; Best J; Egemnazarov B; Weisel FC; Osswald SL; Schermuly RT; Olschewski A; Seeger W; Weissmann N; Eickelberg O; Fink L. 2012. BDNF/TrkB signaling augments smooth muscle cell proliferation in pulmonary hypertension. Am J Pathol 181(6):2018-29. [PubMed: 23058367]  [MGI Ref ID J:190727]

Linnarsson S; Bjorklund A; Ernfors P. 1997. Learning deficit in BDNF mutant mice. Eur J Neurosci 9(12):2581-7. [PubMed: 9517463]  [MGI Ref ID J:46745]

Linnarsson S; Willson CA; Ernfors P. 2000. Cell death in regenerating populations of neurons in BDNF mutant mice. Brain Res Mol Brain Res 75(1):61-9. [PubMed: 10648888]  [MGI Ref ID J:59901]

Liu X; Ernfors P; Wu H; Jaenisch R. 1995. Sensory but not motor neuron deficits in mice lacking NT4 and BDNF. Nature 375(6528):238-41. [PubMed: 7746325]  [MGI Ref ID J:25566]

Liu X; Jaenisch R. 2000. Severe peripheral sensory neuron loss and modest motor neuron reduction in mice with combined deficiency of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin 3 and neurotrophin 4/5. Dev Dyn 218(1):94-101. [PubMed: 10822262]  [MGI Ref ID J:62072]

Lyckman AW; Fan G; Rios M; Jaenisch R; Sur M. 2005. Normal eye-specific patterning of retinal inputs to murine subcortical visual nuclei in the absence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Vis Neurosci 22(1):27-36. [PubMed: 15842738]  [MGI Ref ID J:105280]

Ma L; Lopez GF; Krimm RF. 2009. Epithelial-derived brain-derived neurotrophic factor is required for gustatory neuron targeting during a critical developmental period. J Neurosci 29(11):3354-64. [PubMed: 19295142]  [MGI Ref ID J:147048]

McGough NN; He DY; Logrip ML; Jeanblanc J; Phamluong K; Luong K; Kharazia V; Janak PH; Ron D. 2004. RACK1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: a homeostatic pathway that regulates alcohol addiction. J Neurosci 24(46):10542-52. [PubMed: 15548669]  [MGI Ref ID J:96588]

Nagano T; Yanagawa Y; Obata K; Narisawa-Saito M; Namba H; Otsu Y; Takei N; Nawa H. 2003. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor upregulates and maintains AMPA receptor currents in neocortical GABAergic neurons. Mol Cell Neurosci 24(2):340-56. [PubMed: 14572457]  [MGI Ref ID J:126205]

Nosrat CA; Blomlof J; ElShamy WM; Ernfors P; Olson L. 1997. Lingual deficits in BDNF and NT3 mutant mice leading to gustatory and somatosensory disturbances, respectively. Development 124(7):1333-42. [PubMed: 9118804]  [MGI Ref ID J:40033]

Okayasu I; Yamada Y; Maeda T; Yoshida N; Koga Y; Oi K. 2004. The involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pattern generator of mastication. Brain Res 1016(1):40-7. [PubMed: 15234250]  [MGI Ref ID J:91229]

Olofsdotter K; Lindvall O; Asztely F. 2000. Increased synaptic inhibition in dentate gyrus of mice with reduced levels of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Neuroscience 101(3):531-9. [PubMed: 11113302]  [MGI Ref ID J:118727]

Pang PT; Teng HK; Zaitsev E; Woo NT; Sakata K; Zhen S; Teng KK; Yung WH; Hempstead BL; Lu B. 2004. Cleavage of proBDNF by tPA/plasmin is essential for long-term hippocampal plasticity. Science 306(5695):487-91. [PubMed: 15486301]  [MGI Ref ID J:105428]

Patel AV; Huang T; Krimm RF. 2010. Lingual and palatal gustatory afferents each depend on both BDNF and NT-4, but the dependence is greater for lingual than palatal afferents. J Comp Neurol 518(16):3290-301. [PubMed: 20575060]  [MGI Ref ID J:177759]

Patel AV; Krimm RF. 2010. BDNF is required for the survival of differentiated geniculate ganglion neurons. Dev Biol 340(2):419-29. [PubMed: 20122917]  [MGI Ref ID J:160265]

Patterson SL; Abel T; Deuel TA; Martin KC; Rose JC; Kandel ER. 1996. Recombinant BDNF rescues deficits in basal synaptic transmission and hippocampal LTP in BDNF knockout mice. Neuron 16(6):1137-45. [PubMed: 8663990]  [MGI Ref ID J:110757]

Pineda JR; Canals JM; Bosch M; Adell A; Mengod G; Artigas F; Ernfors P; Alberch J. 2005. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates dopaminergic deficits in a transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease. J Neurochem 93(5):1057-68. [PubMed: 15934928]  [MGI Ref ID J:99427]

Pozzo-Miller LD; Gottschalk W; Zhang L; McDermott K; Du J; Gopalakrishnan R; Oho C; Sheng ZH; Lu B. 1999. Impairments in high-frequency transmission, synaptic vesicle docking, and synaptic protein distribution in the hippocampus of BDNF knockout mice. J Neurosci 19(12):4972-83. [PubMed: 10366630]  [MGI Ref ID J:55493]

Puehringer D; Orel N; Luningschror P; Subramanian N; Herrmann T; Chao MV; Sendtner M. 2013. EGF transactivation of Trk receptors regulates the migration of newborn cortical neurons. Nat Neurosci 16(4):407-15. [PubMed: 23416450]  [MGI Ref ID J:197463]

Radzikinas K; Aven L; Jiang Z; Tran T; Paez-Cortez J; Boppidi K; Lu J; Fine A; Ai X. 2011. A Shh/miR-206/BDNF Cascade Coordinates Innervation and Formation of Airway Smooth Muscle. J Neurosci 31(43):15407-15. [PubMed: 22031887]  [MGI Ref ID J:177268]

Rantamaki T; Kemppainen S; Autio H; Staven S; Koivisto H; Kojima M; Antila H; Miettinen PO; Karkkainen E; Karpova N; Vesa L; Lindemann L; Hoener MC; Tanila H; Castren E. 2013. The impact of Bdnf gene deficiency to the memory impairment and brain pathology of APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. PLoS One 8(7):e68722. [PubMed: 23844236]  [MGI Ref ID J:204296]

Ren-Patterson RF; Cochran LW; Holmes A; Sherrill S; Huang SJ; Tolliver T; Lesch KP; Lu B; Murphy DL. 2005. Loss of brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene allele exacerbates brain monoamine deficiencies and increases stress abnormalities of serotonin transporter knockout mice. J Neurosci Res 79(6):756-71. [PubMed: 15672416]  [MGI Ref ID J:109152]

Rice FL; Albers KM; Davis BM; Silos-Santiago I; Wilkinson GA; LeMaster AM; Ernfors P; Smeyne RJ; Aldskogius H; Phillips HS; Barbacid M; DeChiara TM; Yancopoulos GD; Dunne CE; Fundin BT. 1998. Differential dependency of unmyelinated and A delta epidermal and upper dermal innervation on neurotrophins, trk receptors, and p75LNGFR. Dev Biol 198(1):57-81. [PubMed: 9640332]  [MGI Ref ID J:107715]

Ringstedt T; Linnarsson S; Wagner J; Lendahl U; Kokaia Z; Arenas E; Ernfors P; Ibanez CF. 1998. BDNF regulates reelin expression and Cajal-Retzius cell development in the cerebral cortex. Neuron 21(2):305-15. [PubMed: 9728912]  [MGI Ref ID J:49433]

Rivera-Arconada I; Benedet T; Roza C; Torres B; Barrio J; Krzyzanowska A; Avendano C; Mellstrom B; Lopez-Garcia JA; Naranjo JR. 2010. DREAM regulates BDNF-dependent spinal sensitization. Mol Pain 6:95. [PubMed: 21167062]  [MGI Ref ID J:211454]

Saavedra A; Garcia-Martinez JM; Xifro X; Giralt A; Torres-Peraza JF; Canals JM; Diaz-Hernandez M; Lucas JJ; Alberch J; Perez-Navarro E. 2010. PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 contributes to maintain the activation of the PI3K/Akt pro-survival pathway in Huntington's disease striatum. Cell Death Differ 17(2):324-35. [PubMed: 19745829]  [MGI Ref ID J:169436]

Sallert M; Rantamaki T; Vesikansa A; Anthoni H; Harju K; Yli-Kauhaluoma J; Taira T; Castren E; Lauri SE. 2009. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor controls activity-dependent maturation of CA1 synapses by downregulating tonic activation of presynaptic kainate receptors. J Neurosci 29(36):11294-303. [PubMed: 19741136]  [MGI Ref ID J:152675]

Schuhmann B; Dietrich A; Sel S; Hahn C; Klingenspor M; Lommatzsch M; Gudermann T; Braun A; Renz H; Nockher WA. 2005. A role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor in B cell development. J Neuroimmunol 163(1-2):15-23. [PubMed: 15885304]  [MGI Ref ID J:101880]

Schwartz PM; Borghesani PR; Levy RL; Pomeroy SL; Segal RA. 1997. Abnormal cerebellar development and foliation in BDNF-/- mice reveals a role for neurotrophins in CNS patterning. Neuron 19(2):269-81. [PubMed: 9292718]  [MGI Ref ID J:42627]

Sedy J; Szeder V; Walro JM; Ren ZG; Nanka O; Tessarollo L; Sieber-Blum M; Grim M; Kucera J. 2004. Pacinian corpuscle development involves multiple Trk signaling pathways. Dev Dyn 231(3):551-63. [PubMed: 15376326]  [MGI Ref ID J:93853]

Sohnchen J; Grosheva M; Kiryakova S; Hubbers CU; Sinis N; Skouras E; Ankerne J; Kaidoglou K; Fries JW; Irintchev A; Dunlop SA; Angelov DN. 2010. Recovery of whisking function after manual stimulation of denervated vibrissal muscles requires brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its receptor tyrosine kinase B. Neuroscience 170(1):372-80. [PubMed: 20600640]  [MGI Ref ID J:165213]

Stenqvist A; Agerman K; Marmigere F; Minichiello L; Ernfors P. 2005. Genetic evidence for selective neurotrophin 3 signalling through TrkC but not TrkB in vivo. EMBO Rep 6(10):973-8. [PubMed: 16142215]  [MGI Ref ID J:101705]

Sun H; Oakley B. 2002. Development of anterior gustatory epithelia in the palate and tongue requires epidermal growth factor receptor. Dev Biol 242(1):31-43. [PubMed: 11795938]  [MGI Ref ID J:74312]

Takei N; Kawamura M; Ishizuka Y; Kakiya N; Inamura N; Namba H; Nawa H. 2009. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor enhances the basal rate of protein synthesis by increasing active eukaryotic elongation factor 2 levels and promoting translation elongation in cortical neurons. J Biol Chem 284(39):26340-8. [PubMed: 19625250]  [MGI Ref ID J:156364]

Takemura Y; Imai S; Kojima H; Katagi M; Yamakawa I; Kasahara T; Urabe H; Terashima T; Yasuda H; Chan L; Kimura H; Matsusue Y. 2012. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor from bone marrow-derived cells promotes post-injury repair of peripheral nerve. PLoS One 7(9):e44592. [PubMed: 23028564]  [MGI Ref ID J:191874]

Torres-Peraza J; Pezzi S; Canals JM; Gavalda N; Garcia-Martinez JM; Perez-Navarro E; Alberch J. 2007. Mice heterozygous for neurotrophin-3 display enhanced vulnerability to excitotoxicity in the striatum through increased expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Neuroscience 144(2):462-71. [PubMed: 17081696]  [MGI Ref ID J:117952]

Uutela M; Lindholm J; Louhivuori V; Wei H; Louhivuori LM; Pertovaara A; Akerman K; Castren E; Castren ML. 2012. Reduction of BDNF expression in Fmr1 knockout mice worsens cognitive deficits but improves hyperactivity and sensorimotor deficits. Genes Brain Behav 11(5):513-23. [PubMed: 22435671]  [MGI Ref ID J:198036]

Vaidya VA; Siuciak JA; Du F; Duman RS. 1999. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting induced by chronic electroconvulsive seizures. Neuroscience 89(1):157-66. [PubMed: 10051225]  [MGI Ref ID J:118437]

VonDran MW; Singh H; Honeywell JZ; Dreyfus CF. 2011. Levels of BDNF impact oligodendrocyte lineage cells following a cuprizone lesion. J Neurosci 31(40):14182-90. [PubMed: 21976503]  [MGI Ref ID J:191544]

Vondran MW; Clinton-Luke P; Honeywell JZ; Dreyfus CF. 2010. BDNF+/- mice exhibit deficits in oligodendrocyte lineage cells of the basal forebrain. Glia 58(7):848-56. [PubMed: 20091777]  [MGI Ref ID J:167894]

Wan R; Weigand LA; Bateman R; Griffioen K; Mendelowitz D; Mattson MP. 2014. Evidence that BDNF regulates heart rate by a mechanism involving increased brainstem parasympathetic neuron excitability. J Neurochem 129(4):573-80. [PubMed: 24475741]  [MGI Ref ID J:208782]

Ward NL; Hagg T. 2000. BDNF is needed for postnatal maturation of basal forebrain and neostriatum cholinergic neurons in vivo. Exp Neurol 162(2):297-310. [PubMed: 10739636]  [MGI Ref ID J:61704]

Waterhouse EG; An JJ; Orefice LL; Baydyuk M; Liao GY; Zheng K; Lu B; Xu B. 2012. BDNF promotes differentiation and maturation of adult-born neurons through GABAergic transmission. J Neurosci 32(41):14318-30. [PubMed: 23055503]  [MGI Ref ID J:190905]

Xifro X; Giralt A; Saavedra A; Garcia-Martinez JM; Diaz-Hernandez M; Lucas JJ; Alberch J; Perez-Navarro E. 2009. Reduced calcineurin protein levels and activity in exon-1 mouse models of Huntington's disease: role in excitotoxicity. Neurobiol Dis 36(3):461-9. [PubMed: 19733666]  [MGI Ref ID J:155500]

Xin J; Mesnard NA; Beahrs T; Wainwright DA; Serpe CJ; Alexander TD; Sanders VM; Jones KJ. 2012. CD4+ T cell-mediated neuroprotection is independent of T cell-derived BDNF in a mouse facial nerve axotomy model. Brain Behav Immun 26(6):886-90. [PubMed: 22426430]  [MGI Ref ID J:190173]

Yajima Y; Narita M; Usui A; Kaneko C; Miyatake M; Narita M; Yamaguchi T; Tamaki H; Wachi H; Seyama Y; Suzuki T. 2005. Direct evidence for the involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the development of a neuropathic pain-like state in mice. J Neurochem 93(3):584-94. [PubMed: 15836617]  [MGI Ref ID J:98198]

Yang J; Siao CJ; Nagappan G; Marinic T; Jing D; McGrath K; Chen ZY; Mark W; Tessarollo L; Lee FS; Lu B; Hempstead BL. 2009. Neuronal release of proBDNF. Nat Neurosci 12(2):113-5. [PubMed: 19136973]  [MGI Ref ID J:146179]

Zhang C; Brandemihl A; Lau D; Lawton A; Oakley B. 1997. BDNF is required for the normal development of taste neurons in vivo. Neuroreport 8(4):1013-7. [PubMed: 9141083]  [MGI Ref ID J:40246]

Zhou P; Alfaro J; Chang EH; Zhao X; Porcionatto M; Segal RA. 2011. Numb links extracellular cues to intracellular polarity machinery to promote chemotaxis. Dev Cell 20(5):610-22. [PubMed: 21571219]  [MGI Ref ID J:173240]

Zhou P; Porcionatto M; Pilapil M; Chen Y; Choi Y; Tolias KF; Bikoff JB; Hong EJ; Greenberg ME; Segal RA. 2007. Polarized signaling endosomes coordinate BDNF-induced chemotaxis of cerebellar precursors. Neuron 55(1):53-68. [PubMed: 17610817]  [MGI Ref ID J:128625]

Zhu SW; Codita A; Bogdanovic N; Hjerling-Leffler J; Ernfors P; Winblad B; Dickins DW; Mohammed AH. 2009. Influence of environmental manipulation on exploratory behaviour in male BDNF knockout mice. Behav Brain Res 197(2):339-46. [PubMed: 18951926]  [MGI Ref ID J:144875]

Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Room Number           FGB27

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryThe Bdnftm1Jae strain is maintained by mating heterozygous mice to normal wildtype siblings. Heterozygous x wildtype breeder pairs are supplied. Expected coat color from breeding:Black
Mating System+/+ sibling x Heterozygote         (Female x Male)   01-MAR-06
Diet Information LabDiet® 5K52/5K67

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $239.00Female or MaleHeterozygous for Bdnftm1Jae  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$311.00Heterozygous for Bdnftm1Jae x Wild-type for Bdnftm1Jae  
$311.00Wild-type for Bdnftm1Jae x Heterozygous for Bdnftm1Jae  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $310.70Female or MaleHeterozygous for Bdnftm1Jae  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$404.30Heterozygous for Bdnftm1Jae x Wild-type for Bdnftm1Jae  
$404.30Wild-type for Bdnftm1Jae x Heterozygous for Bdnftm1Jae  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

Control Information

  Control
   Wild-type from the colony
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
Surgical and Preconditioning Services
JAX® Services
Customer Services and Support
Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
Technical Support Email Form

Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


For Licensing and Use Restrictions view the link(s) below:
- Use of MICE by companies or for-profit entities requires a license prior to shipping.

Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


(6.6)