Strain Name:

B6;129S-Ptgs2tm1Jed/J

Stock Number:

002476

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Availability:

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Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Former Names B6;129S7-Ptgs2tm1Jed/J    (Changed: 12-JUN-08 )
Type Mutant Stock; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
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Specieslaboratory mouse
 
Donating InvestigatorDr. Joe Dinchuk,   The Dupont Merck Pharmaceutical Company

Description
Mice homozygous for the Ptgs2tm1Jed targeted mutation exhibit significant preweaning loss of homozygotes (original publication reports 30-40%). Homozygous mutant mice show polydipsia and polyuria due to a defect in renal development. Cardiac fibrosis is evident in approximately 50% of the mice. PTGS2 deficient mice do not show altered inflammatory responses to in several tests of paw and ear edema; however, cytoxicity of hepatic cells induced by endotoxin was strikingly mitigated in these homozygotes. Female homozygotes are infertile with defects in ovulation, fertilization, implantation, and decidualization.

Development
This strain was developed in the lab of Dr. Joe Dinchuk at Glenolden Laboratory, Dupont Merck Pharmaceutical Company. The transcription/translation start sites for the endogenous Ptgs2 gene have been removed. The 129S7-derived AB2.1 ES cell line was used. At The Jackson Laboratory, these mice were bred with B6129SF1/J (Stock No. 101043) to maintain the colony.

Control Information

  Control
   Wild-type from the colony
   101045 B6129SF2/J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

View Strains carrying other alleles of Ptgs2     (4 strains)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Ptgs2tm1Jed/Ptgs2tm1Jed

        involves: 129S7/SvEvBrd * C57BL/6
  • mortality/aging
  • premature death
    • about 20% of mice die between 7 and 23 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
  • reproductive system phenotype
  • *normal* reproductive system phenotype
    • in vitro, oocyte-cumulus cell complexes retrieved from eCG-primed ovaries of adult homozygotes display normal follicular growth and oocyte maturation in vitro, oocyte-cumulus cell complexes retrieved from eCG-primed ovaries of adult homozygotes display normal follicular growth and oocyte maturation   (MGI Ref ID J:69034)
    • also, in vitro-matured oocytes obtained from adult female homozygotes show no significant differences in fertilization or preimplantation development in vitro-matured oocytes obtained from adult female homozygotes show no significant differences in fertilization or preimplantation development   (MGI Ref ID J:69034)
    • abnormal decidualization
      • pseudopregnant female homozygotes fail to exhibit an increase in uterine weight in response to intraluminal infusion of oil (a deciduogenic stimulus)   (MGI Ref ID J:43609)
      • intraluminal infusion of PGI2 (but not PGE2) or cholera toxin as the deciduogenic stimulus partially restores decidualization in ovaroectomized steroid hormonally prepared mutant mice   (MGI Ref ID J:43609)
    • abnormal primary polar body morphology
      • extrusion of the first polar body is rarely noted   (MGI Ref ID J:43609)
    • abnormal superovulation
      • adult (2- to 8-month-old) female homozygotes exhibit a poor ovulation rate upon induction with eCG and hCG   (MGI Ref ID J:69034)
      • immature (3-week-old) female homozygotes exhibit a superior ovulation rate relative to adult homozygotes, suggesting that the ovulatory process becomes defective with aging   (MGI Ref ID J:69034)
      • females homozygotes exhibit significantly reduced ovulation, despite normal ovarian response to gonadotropins   (MGI Ref ID J:43609)
      • any recovered eggs appear developmentally abnormal, with virtually no extrusion of the first polar body   (MGI Ref ID J:43609)
    • decreased litter size
      • homozygous females produce small litters compared to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:118171)
    • failure of embryo implantation
      • in blastocyst transfer experiments, wild-type blastocysts fail to exhibit the initial attachment reaction and do not implant into uteri of pseudopregnant female homozygous mutant mice   (MGI Ref ID J:43609)
      • failure of implantation and subsequent decidualization occur despite normal uterine responsiveness to steroid hormones   (MGI Ref ID J:43609)
    • impaired fertilization
      • female homozygotes display complete failure of fertilization, despite the presence of numerous sperm at the fertilization site   (MGI Ref ID J:43609)
    • reduced female fertility
      • number of term pregnancies reduced   (MGI Ref ID J:109548)
      • only 20% of homozygous females can sustain term pregnancy   (MGI Ref ID J:118171)
  • embryogenesis phenotype
  • abnormal decidualization
    • pseudopregnant female homozygotes fail to exhibit an increase in uterine weight in response to intraluminal infusion of oil (a deciduogenic stimulus)   (MGI Ref ID J:43609)
    • intraluminal infusion of PGI2 (but not PGE2) or cholera toxin as the deciduogenic stimulus partially restores decidualization in ovaroectomized steroid hormonally prepared mutant mice   (MGI Ref ID J:43609)
  • renal/urinary system phenotype
  • *normal* renal/urinary system phenotype
    • adult mice exhibit normal urinalysis and 24-hr urine output under non-stressed conditions   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • no significant differences in urine osmolarity or in daily urinary excretion of sodium, potassium and chloride are observed   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • abnormal kidney cortex morphology
      • by P14, all mice exhibit outer cortical dysplasia   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
      • inner cortical nephron hypertrophy by P42   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
      • abnormal renal glomerulus morphology
        • hypoplastic   (MGI Ref ID J:109548)
        • average glomerular diameter is reduced to 29.4 um from 39.2 um in wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:118171)
        • small, crowded glomeruli in subcapsular region at P10   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
        • outer cortical glomerular hypoplasia at P42   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
        • cortical renal glomerulopathies
          • at >6 weeks of age, renal cortex is abnormal with small immature glomeruli and deteriorating tubules; these changes are not seen in 2-month old COX-1 knockin mice   (MGI Ref ID J:118171)
          • glomerulosclerosis
            • moderate   (MGI Ref ID J:109548)
            • focally variable glomerular sclerosis by P42   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
            • however, no inflammatory infiltrate or vascular pathology is observed at any age   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
        • renal glomerulus fibrosis
          • peri-glomerular fibrosis by P42   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
        • renal glomerulus hypertrophy
          • hypertrophy of juxtamedullary glomeruli at P28   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
          • inner cortical glomerular hypertrophy by P42   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
      • kidney cortex atrophy   (MGI Ref ID J:109548)
      • kidney cortex cysts
        • massive tubular cysts in severely affected kidneys at P14   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • abnormal kidney development
      • mice exhibit progressive cystic dysplasia during the later stages of kidney development   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
      • however, prenatal and early postnatal kidney development appears normal   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • abnormal proximal convoluted tubule morphology
      • variable loss of normal proximal tubule mantle at P10   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
      • proximal convoluted tubule brush border loss
        • by P14, all mice exhibit loss of brush border definition   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • decreased renal glomerular filtration rate
      • adult mice exhibit a ~50% reduction in GFR relative to wild-type controls, as measured by inulin clearance   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • dilated renal tubules
      • variable tubular dilation at P10   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
      • severe diffuse tubular dilation by P42   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • kidney cysts
      • early cystic changes affecting different tubule sections and glomeruli at P10, with slightly variable pathologic progression   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
      • severe cyst formation by P28   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
      • kidney cortex cysts
        • massive tubular cysts in severely affected kidneys at P14   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
      • renal glomerulus cysts
        • by P14, all mice exhibit cystic subcapsular glomeruli   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • kidney degeneration
      • at 8 weeks of age, some mice exhibit more severe cystic degeneration than others   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • kidney failure
      • mice exhibit progressive renal insufficiency   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • pale kidney   (MGI Ref ID J:109548)
    • renal interstitial fibrosis
      • diffuse interstitial fibrosis by P42   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • renal tubule hypertrophy
      • hypertrophy of juxtamedullary tubules by P28   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • small kidney   (MGI Ref ID J:109548)
      • decreased kidney weight
        • starting at P10, total kidney mass is significantly reduced relative to that in wild-type controls   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
        • kidney-specific growth suppression persists to P42 with no significant change   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
      • kidney cortex atrophy   (MGI Ref ID J:109548)
      • renal tubule atrophy
        • by P14, all mice exhibit loss of proximal tubular mass   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • *normal* cardiovascular system phenotype
    • normal systolic blood pressure in awake or anesthetized mice relative to wild-type controls   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • decreased vascular permeability
      • dye extravasation in the ear vasculature is decreased by 50-60% with bradykinin challenge compared to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:118171)
    • increased heart weight
      • at birth, mice exhibit a significantly higher heart weight:body weight ratio relative to control mice   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
      • however, a normal ratio is observed during postnatal growth and early adulthood   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • patent ductus arteriosus
      • fails to close in 40% of mice   (MGI Ref ID J:109548)
  • digestive/alimentary phenotype
  • peritoneal inflammation
    • at 5 months of age, mice show chronic peritonitis   (MGI Ref ID J:118171)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • *normal* homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
    • adult mice exhibit normal plasma sodium, potassium, bicarbonate and chloride levels relative to wild-type controls   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • decreased prostaglandin level
      • near absence of LPS induced synthesis   (MGI Ref ID J:109548)
    • increased blood urea nitrogen level
      • BUN levels are increased ~2-fold vs wild-type at 6 months of age   (MGI Ref ID J:118171)
      • adult mice exhibit a 2.5-fold increase in plasma BUN levels relative to controls   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
    • increased circulating creatinine level
      • adult mice exhibit a 1.5-fold increase in plasma creatinine levels relative to controls   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
  • immune system phenotype
  • peritoneal inflammation
    • at 5 months of age, mice show chronic peritonitis   (MGI Ref ID J:118171)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • *normal* behavior/neurological phenotype
    • mice exhibit normal daily water intake under non-stressed conditions   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • *normal* growth/size/body phenotype
    • mice display normal somatic growth from birth to 42 days of age   (MGI Ref ID J:104002)

Ptgs2tm1Jed/Ptgs2tm1Jed

        B6;129S-Ptgs2tm1Jed/J
  • respiratory system phenotype
  • pulmonary interstitial fibrosis
    • in response to bleomycin-induced lung injury, homozygotes exhibit an aggressive fibroproliferative response, widespread inflammation, loss of alveolar architecture, and increased extracellular matrix protein deposition relative to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:68669)
  • digestive/alimentary phenotype
  • abnormal stomach pH
    • indomethacin-treated mice exhibit a less prominent disruption in pH gradient in the stomach compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:103642)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • decreased physiological sensitivity to xenobiotic
    • indomethacin-treated mice exhibit a less prominent disruption in pH gradient in the stomach compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:103642)

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Ptgs2tm1Jed/Ptgs2tm1Jed

        involves: 129S7/SvEvBrd
  • mortality/aging
  • partial neonatal lethality
    • ~65% of homozygous mutant mice die neonatally   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • premature death
    • homozygotes that reach weaning have an average lifespan of ~3.5 months, with a few animals surviving beyond 6 months   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • renal/urinary system phenotype
  • abnormal kidney morphology
    • all adult homozygotes exhibit renal dysplasia   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
    • abnormal kidney collecting duct morphology
      • homozygous newborns show poor collecting duct development   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
    • abnormal kidney cortex morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
      • abnormal renal glomerulus morphology
        • all adult homozygotes exhibit mild to moderate renal lesions typified by numerous immature small glomeruli found subcapsularly   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
    • abnormal kidney corticomedullary boundary morphology
      • homozygous newborns exhibit corticomedullary atrophy   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
    • abnormal kidney development
      • although fetal metanephri appear normal at E14, kidneys of homozygous newborns appear severely underdeveloped relative to wild-type kidneys   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
      • abnormal kidney mesenchyme morphology
        • homozygous newborns show abundant undifferentiated mesenchyme   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
    • abnormal renal tubule morphology
      • all adult homozygotes exhibit mild to moderate renal lesions typified by multiple foci of dysplastic tubules   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
    • kidney corticomedullary cysts
      • all adult homozygotes display corticomedullary microcysts   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
    • kidney medulla hypoplasia
      • all adult homozygotes display mild medullary hypoplasia or atrophy   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • kidney failure
    • adult homozygotes die of chronic renal failure of developmental origin   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • pyelonephritis
    • all adult homozygotes with renal histopathology are susceptible to development of secondary pyelonephritis   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • reproductive system phenotype
  • absent corpus luteum
    • mutant ovaries show virtual absence of corpora lutea, despite normal ovarian follicular development   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • decreased ovulation rate   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • female infertility
    • homozygous females are largely infertile, rarely giving birth to live offspring   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • small ovary   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • absent corpus luteum
    • mutant ovaries show virtual absence of corpora lutea, despite normal ovarian follicular development   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • small ovary   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • cardiac fibrosis
    • 50% of adult homozygotes exhibit diffuse myocardial fibrosis of variable severity involving both right and left ventricles   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • increased blood urea nitrogen level   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • increased circulating creatinine level   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • immune system phenotype
  • *normal* immune system phenotype
    • homozygotes exhibit normal immune responses to carrageenan-induced paw edema, TPA-induced edema and arachidonic acid-induced edema   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
    • pyelonephritis
      • all adult homozygotes with renal histopathology are susceptible to development of secondary pyelonephritis   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • *normal* hematopoietic system phenotype
    • homozygotes exhibit normal hematologic parameters   (MGI Ref ID J:29974)

Ptgs2tm1Jed/Ptgs2tm1Jed

        involves: 129S7/SvEvBrd * CD-1
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal response to infection
    • following infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA103) bacterila counts in the right lung are lower compared to wild-type controls   (MGI Ref ID J:120725)
    • improved clearance is not the result of increased macrophage or neutrophil recruitment or cytokine production as these measures are similar to wild-type controls   (MGI Ref ID J:120725)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Ptgs2tm1Jed related

Developmental Biology Research
Internal/Organ Defects
      kidney
      kidney: vasculature

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
Inflammation

Internal/Organ Research
Kidney Defects

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Ptgs2tm1Jed
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Joe E Dinchuk
Allele Type Targeted (knock-out)
Common Name(s) COX-2-; COX2-; Ptgs2-;
Mutation Made ByDr. Joe Dinchuk,   The Dupont Merck Pharmaceutical Company
Strain of Origin129S7/SvEvBrd-Hprt
ES Cell Line NameAB2.1
ES Cell Line Strain129S7/SvEvBrd-Hprt
Gene Symbol and Name Ptgs2, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2
Chromosome 1
Gene Common Name(s) COX-2; COX2; GRIPGHS; PGG/HS; PGHS-2; PHS-2; Pghs2; Tis10; cyclooxygenase 2; cyclooxygenase-2; hCox-2; prostaglandin G/H synthase;
Molecular Note A 1.8 kb genomic fragment containing exon 1 and the transcription and translation start sites was replaced with a neomycin selection cassette. Northern blot analysis on RNA derived from embryonic fibroblasts derived from homozygous embryos demonstrated that no detectable transcript was produced from this allele. [MGI Ref ID J:29974]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Ptgs2tm1Jed-Alternate 3, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Dinchuk JE; Car BD; Focht RJ; Johnston JJ; Jaffee BD; Covington MB; Contel NR; Eng VM; Collins RJ; Czerniak PM; Gorry SA; Trzaskos JM.. 1995. Renal abnormalities and an altered inflammatory response in mice lacking cyclooxygenase II. Nature 378(6555):406-9. [PubMed: 7477380]  [MGI Ref ID J:29974]

Additional References

Ethridge RT; Chung DH; Slogoff M; Ehlers RA; Hellmich MR; Rajaraman S; Saito H; Uchida T; Evers BM. 2002. Cyclooxygenase-2 gene disruption attenuates the severity of acute pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Gastroenterology 123(4):1311-22. [PubMed: 12360491]  [MGI Ref ID J:79333]

Hunot S; Vila M; Teismann P; Davis RJ; Hirsch EC; Przedborski S; Rakic P; Flavell RA. 2004. JNK-mediated induction of cyclooxygenase 2 is required for neurodegeneration in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101(2):665-70. [PubMed: 14704277]  [MGI Ref ID J:87428]

Keerthisingam CB; Jenkins RG; Harrison NK; Hernandez-Rodriguez NA; Booth H; Laurent GJ; Hart SL; Foster ML; McAnulty RJ. 2001. Cyclooxygenase-2 deficiency results in a loss of the anti-proliferative response to transforming growth factor-beta in human fibrotic lung fibroblasts and promotes bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Am J Pathol 158(4):1411-22. [PubMed: 11290559]  [MGI Ref ID J:68669]

Oshima M; Dinchuk JE; Kargman SL; Oshima H; Hancock B; Kwong E; Trzaskos JM; Evans JF; Taketo MM. 1996. Suppression of intestinal polyposis in Apc delta716 knockout mice by inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Cell 87(5):803-9. [PubMed: 8945508]  [MGI Ref ID J:36816]

Parman T; Wells PG. 2002. Embryonic prostaglandin H synthase-2 (PHS-2) expression and benzo[a]pyrene teratogenicity in PHS-2 knockout mice. FASEB J 16(9):1001-9. [PubMed: 12087061]  [MGI Ref ID J:77471]

Russell DL; Doyle KM; Ochsner SA; Sandy JD; Richards JS. 2003. Processing and localization of ADAMTS-1 and proteolytic cleavage of versican during cumulus matrix expansion and ovulation. J Biol Chem 278(43):42330-9. [PubMed: 12907688]  [MGI Ref ID J:86134]

Ptgs2tm1Jed related

Alam I; Warden SJ; Robling AG; Turner CH. 2005. Mechanotransduction in bone does not require a functional cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene. J Bone Miner Res 20(3):438-46. [PubMed: 15746988]  [MGI Ref ID J:111300]

Anning PB; Coles B; Morton J; Wang H; Uddin J; Morrow JD; Dey SK; Marnett LJ; O'Donnell VB. 2006. Nitric oxide deficiency promotes vascular side effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors. Blood 108(13):4059-62. [PubMed: 16931629]  [MGI Ref ID J:140540]

Barbieri SS; Amadio P; Gianellini S; Tarantino E; Zacchi E; Veglia F; Howe LR; Weksler BB; Mussoni L; Tremoli E. 2012. Cyclooxygenase-2-derived prostacyclin regulates arterial thrombus formation by suppressing tissue factor in a sirtuin-1-dependent-manner. Circulation 126(11):1373-84. [PubMed: 22865892]  [MGI Ref ID J:202193]

Baumgartner HK; Starodub OT; Joehl JS; Tackett L; Montrose MH. 2004. Cyclooxygenase 1 is required for pH control at the mouse gastric surface. Gut 53(12):1751-7. [PubMed: 15542509]  [MGI Ref ID J:103642]

Blaho VA; Buczynski MW; Brown CR; Dennis EA. 2009. Lipidomic analysis of dynamic eicosanoid responses during the induction and resolution of Lyme arthritis. J Biol Chem 284(32):21599-612. [PubMed: 19487688]  [MGI Ref ID J:153185]

Blaho VA; Buczynski MW; Dennis EA; Brown CR. 2009. Cyclooxygenase-1 orchestrates germinal center formation and antibody class-switch via regulation of IL-17. J Immunol 183(9):5644-53. [PubMed: 19843949]  [MGI Ref ID J:156792]

Burleigh ME; Babaev VR; Oates JA; Harris RC; Gautam S; Riendeau D; Marnett LJ; Morrow JD; Fazio S; Linton MF. 2002. Cyclooxygenase-2 promotes early atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDL receptor-deficient mice. Circulation 105(15):1816-23. [PubMed: 11956125]  [MGI Ref ID J:103220]

Burleigh ME; Babaev VR; Yancey PG; Major AS; McCaleb JL; Oates JA; Morrow JD; Fazio S; Linton MF. 2005. Cyclooxygenase-2 promotes early atherosclerotic lesion formation in ApoE-deficient and C57BL/6 mice. J Mol Cell Cardiol 39(3):443-52. [PubMed: 16040051]  [MGI Ref ID J:103979]

Centuori SM; Trad M; LaCasse CJ; Alizadeh D; Larmonier CB; Hanke NT; Kartchner J; Janikashvili N; Bonnotte B; Larmonier N; Katsanis E. 2012. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells from tumor-bearing mice impair TGF-beta-induced differentiation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs from CD4+CD25-FoxP3- T cells. J Leukoc Biol 92(5):987-97. [PubMed: 22891289]  [MGI Ref ID J:189810]

Chen L; Kim SM; Eisner C; Oppermann M; Huang Y; Mizel D; Li L; Chen M; Sequeira Lopez ML; Weinstein LS; Gomez RA; Schnermann J; Briggs JP. 2010. Stimulation of renin secretion by angiotensin II blockade is Gsalpha-dependent. J Am Soc Nephrol 21(6):986-92. [PubMed: 20395378]  [MGI Ref ID J:185936]

Cheng HF; Wang JL; Zhang MZ; Wang SW; McKanna JA; Harris RC. 2001. Genetic deletion of COX-2 prevents increased renin expression in response to ACE inhibition. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 280(3):F449-56. [PubMed: 11181406]  [MGI Ref ID J:114283]

Cheng JG; Stewart CL. 2003. Loss of cyclooxygenase-2 retards decidual growth but does not inhibit embryo implantation or development to term. Biol Reprod 68(2):401-4. [PubMed: 12533402]  [MGI Ref ID J:81389]

Datta SK; Sabet M; Nguyen KP; Valdez PA; Gonzalez-Navajas JM; Islam S; Mihajlov I; Fierer J; Insel PA; Webster NJ; Guiney DG; Raz E. 2010. Mucosal adjuvant activity of cholera toxin requires Th17 cells and protects against inhalation anthrax. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107(23):10638-43. [PubMed: 20479237]  [MGI Ref ID J:165056]

Diaz-Munoz MD; Osma-Garcia IC; Iniguez MA; Fresno M. 2013. Cyclooxygenase-2 deficiency in macrophages leads to defective p110gamma PI3K signaling and impairs cell adhesion and migration. J Immunol 191(1):395-406. [PubMed: 23733875]  [MGI Ref ID J:205355]

Ejima K; Layne MD; Carvajal IM; Kritek PA; Baron RM; Chen YH; Vom Saal J; Levy BD; Yet SF; Perrella MA. 2003. Cyclooxygenase-2-deficient mice are resistant to endotoxin-induced inflammation and death. FASEB J 17(10):1325-7. [PubMed: 12738799]  [MGI Ref ID J:118510]

Ethridge RT; Chung DH; Slogoff M; Ehlers RA; Hellmich MR; Rajaraman S; Saito H; Uchida T; Evers BM. 2002. Cyclooxygenase-2 gene disruption attenuates the severity of acute pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Gastroenterology 123(4):1311-22. [PubMed: 12360491]  [MGI Ref ID J:79333]

Fong LY; Jiang Y; Riley M; Liu X; Smalley KJ; Guttridge DC; Farber JL. 2008. Prevention of upper aerodigestive tract cancer in zinc-deficient rodents: inefficacy of genetic or pharmacological disruption of COX-2. Int J Cancer 122(5):978-89. [PubMed: 17985342]  [MGI Ref ID J:135556]

Fredenburgh LE; Liang OD; Macias AA; Polte TR; Liu X; Riascos DF; Chung SW; Schissel SL; Ingber DE; Mitsialis SA; Kourembanas S; Perrella MA. 2008. Absence of cyclooxygenase-2 exacerbates hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and enhances contractility of vascular smooth muscle cells. Circulation 117(16):2114-22. [PubMed: 18391113]  [MGI Ref ID J:155091]

Fredenburgh LE; Velandia MM; Ma J; Olszak T; Cernadas M; Englert JA; Chung SW; Liu X; Begay C; Padera RF; Blumberg RS; Walsh SR; Baron RM; Perrella MA. 2011. Cyclooxygenase-2 deficiency leads to intestinal barrier dysfunction and increased mortality during polymicrobial sepsis. J Immunol 187(10):5255-67. [PubMed: 21967897]  [MGI Ref ID J:179504]

Fukunaga K; Kohli P; Bonnans C; Fredenburgh LE; Levy BD. 2005. Cyclooxygenase 2 plays a pivotal role in the resolution of acute lung injury. J Immunol 174(8):5033-9. [PubMed: 15814734]  [MGI Ref ID J:98151]

Hamada T; Tsuchihashi S; Avanesyan A; Duarte S; Moore C; Busuttil RW; Coito AJ. 2008. Cyclooxygenase-2 deficiency enhances Th2 immune responses and impairs neutrophil recruitment in hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury. J Immunol 180(3):1843-53. [PubMed: 18209082]  [MGI Ref ID J:131501]

Hodges RJ; Jenkins RG; Wheeler-Jones CP; Copeman DM; Bottoms SE; Bellingan GJ; Nanthakumar CB; Laurent GJ; Hart SL; Foster ML; McAnulty RJ. 2004. Severity of lung injury in cyclooxygenase-2-deficient mice is dependent on reduced prostaglandin E(2) production. Am J Pathol 165(5):1663-76. [PubMed: 15509536]  [MGI Ref ID J:93638]

Howe LR; Chang SH; Tolle KC; Dillon R; Young LJ; Cardiff RD; Newman RA; Yang P; Thaler HT; Muller WJ; Hudis C; Brown AM; Hla T; Subbaramaiah K; Dannenberg AJ. 2005. HER2/neu-induced mammary tumorigenesis and angiogenesis are reduced in cyclooxygenase-2 knockout mice. Cancer Res 65(21):10113-9. [PubMed: 16267038]  [MGI Ref ID J:102694]

Hunot S; Vila M; Teismann P; Davis RJ; Hirsch EC; Przedborski S; Rakic P; Flavell RA. 2004. JNK-mediated induction of cyclooxygenase 2 is required for neurodegeneration in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101(2):665-70. [PubMed: 14704277]  [MGI Ref ID J:87428]

Im JY; Kim D; Paik SG; Han PL. 2006. Cyclooxygenase-2-dependent neuronal death proceeds via superoxide anion generation. Free Radic Biol Med 41(6):960-72. [PubMed: 16934679]  [MGI Ref ID J:112581]

Keerthisingam CB; Jenkins RG; Harrison NK; Hernandez-Rodriguez NA; Booth H; Laurent GJ; Hart SL; Foster ML; McAnulty RJ. 2001. Cyclooxygenase-2 deficiency results in a loss of the anti-proliferative response to transforming growth factor-beta in human fibrotic lung fibroblasts and promotes bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Am J Pathol 158(4):1411-22. [PubMed: 11290559]  [MGI Ref ID J:68669]

Kellogg AP; Converso K; Wiggin T; Stevens M; Pop-Busui R. 2009. Effects of cyclooxygenase-2 gene inactivation on cardiac autonomic and left ventricular function in experimental diabetes. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 296(2):H453-61. [PubMed: 19060127]  [MGI Ref ID J:146314]

Kellogg AP; Wiggin TD; Larkin DD; Hayes JM; Stevens MJ; Pop-Busui R. 2007. Protective effects of cyclooxygenase-2 gene inactivation against peripheral nerve dysfunction and intraepidermal nerve fiber loss in experimental diabetes. Diabetes 56(12):2997-3005. [PubMed: 17720896]  [MGI Ref ID J:132324]

Kim SM; Chen L; Mizel D; Huang YG; Briggs JP; Schnermann J. 2007. Low plasma renin and reduced renin secretory responses to acute stimuli in conscious COX-2-deficient mice. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 292(1):F415-22. [PubMed: 16954340]  [MGI Ref ID J:118087]

Kuper C; Bartels H; Beck FX; Neuhofer W. 2011. Cyclooxygenase-2-dependent phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bad inhibits tonicity-induced apoptosis in renal medullary cells. Kidney Int 80(9):938-45. [PubMed: 21716255]  [MGI Ref ID J:194718]

Lim H; Gupta RA; Ma WG; Paria BC; Moller DE; Morrow JD; DuBois RN; Trzaskos JM; Dey SK. 1999. Cyclo-oxygenase-2-derived prostacyclin mediates embryo implantation in the mouse via PPARdelta. Genes Dev 13(12):1561-74. [PubMed: 10385625]  [MGI Ref ID J:56144]

Lim H; Paria BC; Das SK; Dinchuk JE; Langenbach R; Trzaskos JM; Dey SK. 1997. Multiple female reproductive failures in cyclooxygenase 2-deficient mice. Cell 91(2):197-208. [PubMed: 9346237]  [MGI Ref ID J:43609]

Liu H; Ye W; Guan G; Dong Z; Jia Z; Yang T. 2007. Developmental regulation of calcineurin isoforms in the rodent kidney: association with COX-2. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 293(6):F1898-904. [PubMed: 17881460]  [MGI Ref ID J:127529]

Lorenz M; Slaughter HS; Wescott DM; Carter SI; Schnyder B; Dinchuk JE; Car BD. 1999. Cyclooxygenase-2 is essential for normal recovery from 5-fluorouracil-induced myelotoxicity in mice. Exp Hematol 27(10):1494-502. [PubMed: 10517490]  [MGI Ref ID J:115084]

Matsumoto H; Ma W; Smalley W; Trzaskos J; Breyer RM; Dey SK. 2001. Diversification of cyclooxygenase-2-derived prostaglandins in ovulation and implantation. Biol Reprod 64(5):1557-65. [PubMed: 11319164]  [MGI Ref ID J:69034]

Matsumoto H; Ma WG; Daikoku T; Zhao X; Paria BC; Das SK; Trzaskos JM; Dey SK. 2002. Cyclooxygenase-2 differentially directs uterine angiogenesis during implantation in mice. J Biol Chem 277(32):29260-7. [PubMed: 12034746]  [MGI Ref ID J:78279]

Moeckel GW; Zhang L; Fogo AB; Hao CM; Pozzi A; Breyer MD. 2003. COX2 activity promotes organic osmolyte accumulation and adaptation of renal medullary interstitial cells to hypertonic stress. J Biol Chem 278(21):19352-7. [PubMed: 12637551]  [MGI Ref ID J:83578]

Muller-Decker K; Furstenberger G. 2007. The cyclooxygenase-2-mediated prostaglandin signaling is causally related to epithelial carcinogenesis. Mol Carcinog 46(8):705-10. [PubMed: 17546626]  [MGI Ref ID J:126154]

Nadeau JH. 2001. Modifier genes in mice and humans. Nat Rev Genet 2(3):165-74. [PubMed: 11256068]  [MGI Ref ID J:88013]

Nemeth K; Leelahavanichkul A; Yuen PS; Mayer B; Parmelee A; Doi K; Robey PG; Leelahavanichkul K; Koller BH; Brown JM; Hu X; Jelinek I; Star RA; Mezey E. 2009. Bone marrow stromal cells attenuate sepsis via prostaglandin E(2)-dependent reprogramming of host macrophages to increase their interleukin-10 production. Nat Med 15(1):42-9. [PubMed: 19098906]  [MGI Ref ID J:146566]

Nilsson L; Madsen K; Topcu SO; Jensen BL; Frokiaer J; Norregaard R. 2012. Disruption of cyclooxygenase-2 prevents downregulation of cortical AQP2 and AQP3 in response to bilateral ureteral obstruction in the mouse. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 302(11):F1430-9. [PubMed: 22397925]  [MGI Ref ID J:185468]

Norregaard R; Madsen K; Hansen PB; Bie P; Thavalingam S; Frokiaer J; Jensen BL. 2011. COX-2 disruption leads to increased central vasopressin stores and impaired urine concentrating ability in mice. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 301(6):F1303-13. [PubMed: 21880835]  [MGI Ref ID J:180040]

Norwood VF; Morham SG; Smithies O. 2000. Postnatal development and progression of renal dysplasia in cyclooxygenase-2 null mice. Kidney Int 58(6):2291-300. [PubMed: 11115063]  [MGI Ref ID J:104002]

Ochsner SA; Russell DL; Day AJ; Breyer RM; Richards JS. 2003. Decreased expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated gene 6 in cumulus cells of the cyclooxygenase-2 and EP2 null mice. Endocrinology 144(3):1008-19. [PubMed: 12586778]  [MGI Ref ID J:115517]

Oshima M; Dinchuk JE; Kargman SL; Oshima H; Hancock B; Kwong E; Trzaskos JM; Evans JF; Taketo MM. 1996. Suppression of intestinal polyposis in Apc delta716 knockout mice by inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Cell 87(5):803-9. [PubMed: 8945508]  [MGI Ref ID J:36816]

Paliege A; Mizel D; Medina C; Pasumarthy A; Huang YG; Bachmann S; Briggs JP; Schnermann JB; Yang T. 2004. Inhibition of nNOS expression in the macula densa by COX-2-derived prostaglandin E(2). Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 287(1):F152-9. [PubMed: 15010356]  [MGI Ref ID J:113758]

Parman T; Wells PG. 2002. Embryonic prostaglandin H synthase-2 (PHS-2) expression and benzo[a]pyrene teratogenicity in PHS-2 knockout mice. FASEB J 16(9):1001-9. [PubMed: 12087061]  [MGI Ref ID J:77471]

Patel NS; Cuzzocrea S; Collino M; Chaterjee PK; Mazzon E; Britti D; Yaqoob MM; Thiemermann C. 2007. The role of cycloxygenase-2 in the rodent kidney following ischaemia/reperfusion injury in vivo. Eur J Pharmacol 562(1-2):148-54. [PubMed: 17343844]  [MGI Ref ID J:124476]

Poon R; Smits R; Li C; Jagmohan-Changur S; Kong M; Cheon S; Yu C; Fodde R; Alman BA. 2001. Cyclooxygenase-two (COX-2) modulates proliferation in aggressive fibromatosis (desmoid tumor). Oncogene 20(4):451-60. [PubMed: 11313976]  [MGI Ref ID J:69222]

Sadikot RT; Zeng H; Azim AC; Joo M; Dey SK; Breyer RM; Peebles RS; Blackwell TS; Christman JW. 2007. Bacterial clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is enhanced by the inhibition of COX-2. Eur J Immunol 37(4):1001-9. [PubMed: 17330822]  [MGI Ref ID J:120725]

Sakai Y; Tanaka T; Seki M; Okuyama S; Fukuchi T; Yamagata K; Takei N; Nawa H; Abe H. 2009. Cyclooxygenase-2 plays a critical role in retinal ganglion cell death after transient ischemia: real-time monitoring of RGC survival using Thy-1-EGFP transgenic mice. Neurosci Res 65(4):319-25. [PubMed: 19698752]  [MGI Ref ID J:157323]

Schwarz NT; Kalff JC; Turler A; Engel BM; Watkins SC; Billiar TR; Bauer AJ. 2001. Prostanoid production via COX-2 as a causative mechanism of rodent postoperative ileus. Gastroenterology 121(6):1354-71. [PubMed: 11729115]  [MGI Ref ID J:107752]

Seno H; Oshima M; Ishikawa TO; Oshima H; Takaku K; Chiba T; Narumiya S; Taketo MM. 2002. Cyclooxygenase 2- and prostaglandin E(2) receptor EP(2)-dependent angiogenesis in Apc(Delta716) mouse intestinal polyps. Cancer Res 62(2):506-11. [PubMed: 11809702]  [MGI Ref ID J:74003]

Shi XZ; Lin YM; Powell DW; Sarna SK. 2011. Pathophysiology of motility dysfunction in bowel obstruction: role of stretch-induced COX-2. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 300(1):G99-G108. [PubMed: 21051526]  [MGI Ref ID J:168389]

Shimada M; Hernandez-Gonzalez I; Gonzalez-Robayna I; Richards JS. 2006. Paracrine and autocrine regulation of epidermal growth factor-like factors in cumulus oocyte complexes and granulosa cells: key roles for prostaglandin synthase 2 and progesterone receptor. Mol Endocrinol 20(6):1352-65. [PubMed: 16543407]  [MGI Ref ID J:108939]

Staehr M; Hansen PB; Madsen K; Vanhoutte PM; Nusing RM; Jensen BL. 2013. Deletion of cyclooxygenase-2 in the mouse increases arterial blood pressure with no impairment in renal NO production in response to chronic high salt intake. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 304(10):R899-907. [PubMed: 23535462]  [MGI Ref ID J:197618]

Stevens HY; Meays DR; Yeh J; Bjursten LM; Frangos JA. 2006. COX-2 is necessary for venous ligation-mediated bone adaptation in mice. Bone 38(1):93-104. [PubMed: 16122997]  [MGI Ref ID J:104470]

Subbaramaiah K; Howe LR; Port ER; Brogi E; Fishman J; Liu CH; Hla T; Hudis C; Dannenberg AJ. 2006. HER-2/neu status is a determinant of mammary aromatase activity in vivo: evidence for a cyclooxygenase-2-dependent mechanism. Cancer Res 66(10):5504-11. [PubMed: 16707480]  [MGI Ref ID J:109047]

Takabayshi K; Corr M; Hayashi T; Redecke V; Beck L; Guiney D; Sheppard D; Raz E. 2006. Induction of a homeostatic circuit in lung tissue by microbial compounds. Immunity 24(4):475-87. [PubMed: 16618605]  [MGI Ref ID J:113350]

Takeda H; Sonoshita M; Oshima H; Sugihara K; Chulada PC; Langenbach R; Oshima M; Taketo MM. 2003. Cooperation of cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 in intestinal polyposis. Cancer Res 63(16):4872-7. [PubMed: 12941808]  [MGI Ref ID J:85136]

Taketo MM. 2006. Mouse models of gastrointestinal tumors. Cancer Sci 97(5):355-61. [PubMed: 16630131]  [MGI Ref ID J:116407]

Thiel A; Narko K; Heinonen M; Hemmes A; Tomasetto C; Rio MC; Haglund C; Makela TP; Ristimaki A. 2012. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 causes regression of gastric adenomas in trefoil factor 1 deficient mice. Int J Cancer 131(5):1032-41. [PubMed: 22034055]  [MGI Ref ID J:186123]

Traves PG; Pimentel-Santillana M; Carrasquero LM; Perez-Sen R; Delicado EG; Luque A; Izquierdo M; Martin-Sanz P; Miras-Portugal MT; Bosca L. 2013. Selective Impairment of P2Y Signaling by Prostaglandin E2 in Macrophages: Implications for Ca2+-Dependent Responses. J Immunol 190(8):4226-35. [PubMed: 23479225]  [MGI Ref ID J:194901]

Tuo J; Tuaillon N; Shen D; Chan CC. 2004. Endotoxin-induced uveitis in cyclooxygenase-2-deficient mice. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 45(7):2306-13. [PubMed: 15223810]  [MGI Ref ID J:109715]

Udd L; Katajisto P; Rossi DJ; Lepisto A; Lahesmaa AM; Ylikorkala A; Jarvinen HJ; Ristimaki AP; Makela TP. 2004. Suppression of Peutz-Jeghers polyposis by inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2. Gastroenterology 127(4):1030-7. [PubMed: 15480979]  [MGI Ref ID J:93361]

Wan SG; Taccioli C; Jiang Y; Chen H; Smalley KJ; Huang K; Liu XP; Farber JL; Croce CM; Fong LY. 2011. Zinc deficiency activates S100A8 inflammation in the absence of COX-2 and promotes murine oral-esophageal tumor progression. Int J Cancer 129(2):331-45. [PubMed: 20857495]  [MGI Ref ID J:173809]

Watanabe T; Kobata A; Tanigawa T; Nadatani Y; Yamagami H; Watanabe K; Tominaga K; Fujiwara Y; Takeuchi K; Arakawa T. 2012. Activation of the MyD88 signaling pathway inhibits ischemia-reperfusion injury in the small intestine. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 303(3):G324-34. [PubMed: 22628037]  [MGI Ref ID J:191354]

Williams CS; Tsujii M; Reese J; Dey SK; DuBois RN. 2000. Host cyclooxygenase-2 modulates carcinoma growth J Clin Invest 105(11):1589-94. [PubMed: 10841517]  [MGI Ref ID J:62763]

Yang H; Zhang J; Andreasson K; Chen C. 2008. COX-2 oxidative metabolism of endocannabinoids augments hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Mol Cell Neurosci 37(4):682-95. [PubMed: 18295507]  [MGI Ref ID J:135668]

Yang T; Endo Y; Huang YG; Smart A; Briggs JP; Schnermann J. 2000. Renin expression in COX-2-knockout mice on normal or low-salt diets. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 279(5):F819-25. [PubMed: 11053041]  [MGI Ref ID J:114184]

Yang T; Huang YG; Ye W; Hansen P; Schnermann JB; Briggs JP. 2005. Influence of genetic background and gender on hypertension and renal failure in COX-2-deficient mice. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 288(6):F1125-32. [PubMed: 15613621]  [MGI Ref ID J:98504]

Yang WL; Cai KQ; Smedberg JL; Smith ER; Klein-Szanto A; Hamilton TC; Xu XX. 2007. A reduction of cyclooxygenase 2 gene dosage counters the ovarian morphological aging and tumor phenotype in Wv mice. Am J Pathol 170(4):1325-36. [PubMed: 17392171]  [MGI Ref ID J:120134]

Yanni SE; Barnett JM; Clark ML; Penn JS. 2009. The role of PGE2 receptor EP4 in pathologic ocular angiogenesis. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 50(11):5479-86. [PubMed: 19494202]  [MGI Ref ID J:154655]

Yanni SE; McCollum GW; Penn JS. 2010. Genetic deletion of COX-2 diminishes VEGF production in mouse retinal Muller cells. Exp Eye Res 91(1):34-41. [PubMed: 20398651]  [MGI Ref ID J:164125]

Yao B; Xu J; Harris RC; Zhang MZ. 2008. Renal localization and regulation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 294(2):F433-9. [PubMed: 18057186]  [MGI Ref ID J:130424]

Yokota T; Meka CS; Medina KL; Igarashi H; Comp PC; Takahashi M; Nishida M; Oritani K; Miyagawa J; Funahashi T; Tomiyama Y; Matsuzawa Y; Kincade PW. 2002. Paracrine regulation of fat cell formation in bone marrow cultures via adiponectin and prostaglandins. J Clin Invest 109(10):1303-10. [PubMed: 12021245]  [MGI Ref ID J:140382]

Yu J; Wu CW; Chu ES; Hui AY; Cheng AS; Go MY; Ching AK; Chui YL; Chan HL; Sung JJ. 2008. Elucidation of the role of COX-2 in liver fibrogenesis using transgenic mice. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 372(4):571-7. [PubMed: 18503750]  [MGI Ref ID J:137793]

Yu Y; Fan J; Chen XS; Wang D; Klein-Szanto AJ; Campbell RL; Fitzgerald GA; Funk CD. 2006. Genetic model of selective COX2 inhibition reveals novel heterodimer signaling. Nat Med 12(6):699-704. [PubMed: 16732282]  [MGI Ref ID J:109548]

Yu Y; Fan J; Hui Y; Rouzer CA; Marnett LJ; Klein-Szanto AJ; FitzGerald GA; Funk CD. 2007. Targeted cyclooxygenase gene (ptgs) exchange reveals discriminant isoform functionality. J Biol Chem 282(2):1498-506. [PubMed: 17110378]  [MGI Ref ID J:118171]

Zhang MZ; Yao B; Fang X; Wang S; Smith JP; Harris RC. 2009. Intrarenal dopaminergic system regulates renin expression. Hypertension 53(3):564-70. [PubMed: 19139376]  [MGI Ref ID J:164994]

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    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 11 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

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At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

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Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.
    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 11 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice
    Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

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"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

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