Strain Name:

B6;129S7-Vldlrtm1Her/J

Stock Number:

002529

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Research Strain

Mice homozygous for the Vldlrtm1Her targeted mutation are smaller and leaner than normal wildtype siblings. The high level of expression in muscle and adipose tissue suggests a role in VLDL triacylglycerol delivery. Homozygous mice show a modest decrease in body weight, body mass index, and adipose tissue mass as determined by the weights of epididymal fat pads. In segregation analysis homozygotes show association with subretinal neovascularization and were found to have a neovascularization process similar to a type seen in patients with macular degeneration.

Description

Strain Information

Type Mutant Stock; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
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Mating SystemHomozygote x Homozygote         (Female x Male)   01-MAR-06
Specieslaboratory mouse
 
Donating InvestigatorDr. Joachim Herz,   Univ of Texas Southwest Med Ctr Dallas

Appearance
black
Related Genotype: a/a

Description
Mice homozygous for the Vldlrtm1Her targeted mutation are viable and fertile. They are smaller and leaner than normal wildtype siblings. The high level of expression in muscle and adipose tissue suggests a role in VLDL triacylglycerol delivery. Plasma levels of cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and lipoproteins were normal when mice were fed normal, high-carbohydrate or high fat diets. However, homozygous mice do show a modest decrease in body weight, body mass index, and adipose tissue mass as determined by the weights of epididymal fat pads. Many homozygous pups in the colony at the Jackson Lab have patchy fur (hair loss) at weaning but look normal at about 6 weeks of age. In a segregation analysis crossing homozygous females with normal "C57BL6/2J" mice, offspring that were homozygous for this Vldlrtm1Her mutation are associated with subretinal neovascularization and were found to have a neovascularization process similar to a type seen in patients with macular degeneration.

Development
This strain was developed in the lab of Dr. Joachim Herz at The University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. The mutant allele contains a partial deletion of exon 5 of the Vldlr gene. The neo cassette inserted disrupted the reading frame. No protein is detectable by immunoblot analysis. The 129/Sv-derived JH-1 ES cell line was used.

Control Information

  Control
   101045 B6129SF2/J (approximate)
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
- Model with phenotypic similarity to human disease where etiologies are distinct. Human genes are associated with this disease. Orthologs of these genes do not appear in the mouse genotype(s).
Macular Degeneration, Age-Related, 1; ARMD1
- Potential model based on gene homology relationships. Phenotypic similarity to the human disease has not been tested.
Cerebellar Ataxia, Mental Retardation, and Dysequilibrium Syndrome 1; CAMRQ1   (VLDLR)
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Vldlrtm1Her/Vldlrtm1Her

        involves: 129S7/SvEvBrd * C57BL/6J
  • adipose tissue phenotype
  • decreased epididymal fat pad weight
    • decreased adipose tissue, determined by weights of epididymal fat pads   (MGI Ref ID J:28591)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • decreased body size   (MGI Ref ID J:28591)
    • decreased body weight
      • weight reduced by 15 to 20% versus littermates   (MGI Ref ID J:28591)
      • decreased body mass index (BMI)   (MGI Ref ID J:28591)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • *normal* homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
    • normal plasma concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerol, lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids   (MGI Ref ID J:28591)

Vldlrtm1Her/Vldlrtm1Her

        involves: 129S7/SvEvBrd * C57BL/6
  • vision/eye phenotype
  • abnormal ocular fundus morphology
    • at 6 weeks, some depigmented pink spots are observed in the fundus; spots develop into large, irregularly shaped pink areas by 6 months of age   (MGI Ref ID J:114757)
  • choroidal neovascularization   (MGI Ref ID J:114757)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • pathological neovascularization
    • at 3 weeks, focal areas of neovascular leakage are observed and increase in number with age   (MGI Ref ID J:114757)
    • new vessels originate in the plexiform layer, grow and migrate into the subretinal space   (MGI Ref ID J:114757)
    • choroidal anastomoses occur commonly by 3 months, but are seen as early as 15 days in some animals   (MGI Ref ID J:114757)
    • choroidal neovascularization   (MGI Ref ID J:114757)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • *normal* homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
    • mice show normal FVIII (Factor 8) and VWF (von Willebrand factor) levels in plasma   (MGI Ref ID J:117317)
    • increased circulating cholesterol level
      • levels are significantly increased (>3-fold) compared to controls   (MGI Ref ID J:117317)
    • increased circulating triglyceride level
      • levels are significantly increased (4-fold) compared to controls   (MGI Ref ID J:117317)

Vldlrtm1Her/Vldlrtm1Her

        B6;129S7-Vldlrtm1Her/J
  • vision/eye phenotype
  • abnormal retina morphology
    • accumulation of cell debris is observed prior to development of intraretinal neovascularization   (MGI Ref ID J:128315)
    • angiomatous growths are densely distributed throughout retina at 4 weeks   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
    • at 6 weeks, scattered pink spots progress to large, irregular pink areas by 6 months; leaking spots decrease after 8 months with large rigid vascular tangles still present and leakage is barely detectable by 12 months   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
    • fibrosis formation is present at 12 months, beginning around 3 months with fibroblast accumulation at lesion site   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
    • abnormal retinal neuronal layer morphology
      • between 6 and 8 weeks, both outer and inner segments are disrupted in lesion area; migration of RPE cells into lesion area is observed   (MGI Ref ID J:128315)
      • decreased retinal photoreceptor cell number
        • significant loss of photoreceptors is seen at 6 months, resulting in thinning of outer nuclear layer   (MGI Ref ID J:128315)
        • increased loss is detected at 12 months   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
      • disorganized retinal inner nuclear layer
      • retinal outer nuclear layer degeneration
        • destruction of ONL is seen starting at 6 months   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
      • retinal photoreceptor degeneration
        • observed at 10 months   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
      • thin retinal outer nuclear layer
        • reduced in thickness by 6 months   (MGI Ref ID J:128315)
        • reduced overall at 12 months; layer is completely diminished by 24 months   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
    • abnormal retinal pigment epithelium morphology
      • thickening of RPE cells is observed prior to development of intraretinal neovascularization   (MGI Ref ID J:128315)
      • disruption of RPE layer is observed by 6 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
      • pigment adhesions to neural tissue are seen by 6 weeks, representing pigment epithelium detachment   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
    • retinal neovascularization
      • new vessels form in outer plexiform layer of retina around 3 weeks of age; vessels migrate into subretinal space by 4 weeks   (MGI Ref ID J:128315)
      • angiography shows leakage in retinas at 6 weeks, mainly in central area of retina near optic nerve, with red blood cells found around the leakage spot; neovascularization is localized to outer nuclear layer and in subretinal space   (MGI Ref ID J:128315)
      • signs of new vessel growth is observed at 14 days in deep capillary bed of outer plexiform layer (OPL) of retina, protruding into avascular zone of outer nuclear layer (ONL)   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
      • new vessel buds reach subretinal space by P15   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
      • leakage is first seen at 3 weeks and increases with age, with leaking areas covering most of retinal by 6 weeks   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
      • clumps of retinal pigmented epithelial cells (RPE) adhere to neovascular tufts in subretinal space; these increase with age   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
      • subretinal neovascularization (SRN) is seen at 6 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
      • fibrosis formation is present at 12 months, beginning around 3 months with fibroblast accumulation at lesion site   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
  • choroidal neovascularization
    • CNV membranes develop after 6 months of age with some tissue destruction in INL and ONL   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
    • some retinal-choroidal anastomoses may be observed at 10 months   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • decreased retinal photoreceptor cell number
    • significant loss of photoreceptors is seen at 6 months, resulting in thinning of outer nuclear layer   (MGI Ref ID J:128315)
    • increased loss is detected at 12 months   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
  • retinal photoreceptor degeneration
    • observed at 10 months   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • choroidal neovascularization
    • CNV membranes develop after 6 months of age with some tissue destruction in INL and ONL   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
    • some retinal-choroidal anastomoses may be observed at 10 months   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
  • retinal neovascularization
    • new vessels form in outer plexiform layer of retina around 3 weeks of age; vessels migrate into subretinal space by 4 weeks   (MGI Ref ID J:128315)
    • angiography shows leakage in retinas at 6 weeks, mainly in central area of retina near optic nerve, with red blood cells found around the leakage spot; neovascularization is localized to outer nuclear layer and in subretinal space   (MGI Ref ID J:128315)
    • signs of new vessel growth is observed at 14 days in deep capillary bed of outer plexiform layer (OPL) of retina, protruding into avascular zone of outer nuclear layer (ONL)   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
    • new vessel buds reach subretinal space by P15   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
    • leakage is first seen at 3 weeks and increases with age, with leaking areas covering most of retinal by 6 weeks   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
    • clumps of retinal pigmented epithelial cells (RPE) adhere to neovascular tufts in subretinal space; these increase with age   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
    • subretinal neovascularization (SRN) is seen at 6 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
    • fibrosis formation is present at 12 months, beginning around 3 months with fibroblast accumulation at lesion site   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
  • pigmentation phenotype
  • abnormal retinal pigment epithelium morphology
    • thickening of RPE cells is observed prior to development of intraretinal neovascularization   (MGI Ref ID J:128315)
    • disruption of RPE layer is observed by 6 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)
    • pigment adhesions to neural tissue are seen by 6 weeks, representing pigment epithelium detachment   (MGI Ref ID J:132497)

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Vldlrtm1Her/Vldlrtm1Her

        involves: 129S7/SvEvBrd
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal brain morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:55691)
    • abnormal brain development
      • cortical layering disrupted, layers not clearly separated and neurons were arranged in a radial fashion   (MGI Ref ID J:55691)
      • abnormal cerebellar foliation
        • less foliated than wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:55691)
    • abnormal cerebellum morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:55691)
      • abnormal cerebellar foliation
        • less foliated than wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:55691)
      • small cerebellum   (MGI Ref ID J:55691)
  • abnormal long term potentiation
    • while synaptic transmission and short term plasticity appeared normal in the CA1 region, LTP induction was impaired   (MGI Ref ID J:79593)
    • reduced long term potentiation   (MGI Ref ID J:79593)
  • impaired synaptic plasticity   (MGI Ref ID J:79593)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal contextual conditioning behavior
    • contextual fear-conditioned learning deficits   (MGI Ref ID J:79593)
  • abnormal cued conditioning behavior
    • cued conditioning was reduced when tested 24 hours following training, however it was normal when tested 1 hour following training   (MGI Ref ID J:79593)
  • hyperactivity   (MGI Ref ID J:79593)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Sensorineural Research
Eye Defects

Vldlrtm1Her related

Cardiovascular Research
Other
      altered fat metabolism

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Vldlrtm1Her
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Joachim Herz
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Common Name(s) VLDLR-;
Mutation Made ByDr. Joachim Herz,   Univ of Texas Southwest Med Ctr Dallas
Strain of Origin129S7/SvEvBrd
ES Cell Line NameJH1
ES Cell Line Strain129S7/SvEvBrd
Gene Symbol and Name Vldlr, very low density lipoprotein receptor
Chromosome 19
Gene Common Name(s) AA408956; AI451093; AW047288; CARMQ1; CHRMQ1; VLDLRCH; expressed sequence AA408956; expressed sequence AI451093; expressed sequence AW047288;
Molecular Note The insertion of a neomycin selection cassette into exon 5 deleted a portion of the coding sequence and disrupted the reading frame. Immunoblot analysis of heart muscle membranes did not detect protein in homozygous mutant animals. [MGI Ref ID J:28591]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Vldlrtm1Her, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Additional References

Vldlrtm1Her related

Akopians AL; Babayan AH; Beffert U; Herz J; Basbaum AI; Phelps PE. 2008. Contribution of the Reelin signaling pathways to nociceptive processing. Eur J Neurosci 27(3):523-37. [PubMed: 18279306]  [MGI Ref ID J:132269]

Andrade N; Komnenovic V; Blake SM; Jossin Y; Howell B; Goffinet A; Schneider WJ; Nimpf J. 2007. ApoER2/VLDL receptor and Dab1 in the rostral migratory stream function in postnatal neuronal migration independently of Reelin. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104(20):8508-13. [PubMed: 17494763]  [MGI Ref ID J:121846]

Assadi AH; Zhang G; Beffert U; McNeil RS; Renfro AL; Niu S; Quattrocchi CC; Antalffy BA; Sheldon M; Armstrong DD; Wynshaw-Boris A; Herz J; D'Arcangelo G; Clark GD. 2003. Interaction of reelin signaling and Lis1 in brain development. Nat Genet 35(3):270-6. [PubMed: 14578885]  [MGI Ref ID J:86398]

Barr AM; Fish KN; Markou A. 2007. The reelin receptors VLDLR and ApoER2 regulate sensorimotor gating in mice. Neuropharmacology 52(4):1114-23. [PubMed: 17261317]  [MGI Ref ID J:124495]

Beffert U; Durudas A; Weeber EJ; Stolt PC; Giehl KM; Sweatt JD; Hammer RE; Herz J. 2006. Functional dissection of Reelin signaling by site-directed disruption of Disabled-1 adaptor binding to apolipoprotein E receptor 2: distinct roles in development and synaptic plasticity. J Neurosci 26(7):2041-52. [PubMed: 16481437]  [MGI Ref ID J:105699]

Beffert U; Weeber EJ; Morfini G; Ko J; Brady ST; Tsai LH; Sweatt JD; Herz J. 2004. Reelin and cyclin-dependent kinase 5-dependent signals cooperate in regulating neuronal migration and synaptic transmission. J Neurosci 24(8):1897-906. [PubMed: 14985430]  [MGI Ref ID J:90122]

Blake SM; Strasser V; Andrade N; Duit S; Hofbauer R; Schneider WJ; Nimpf J. 2008. Thrombospondin-1 binds to ApoER2 and VLDL receptor and functions in postnatal neuronal migration. EMBO J 27(22):3069-80. [PubMed: 18946489]  [MGI Ref ID J:143787]

Bock HH; Herz J. 2003. Reelin activates SRC family tyrosine kinases in neurons. Curr Biol 13(1):18-26. [PubMed: 12526740]  [MGI Ref ID J:109819]

Bodea GO; Spille JH; Abe P; Andersson AS; Acker-Palmer A; Stumm R; Kubitscheck U; Blaess S. 2014. Reelin and CXCL12 regulate distinct migratory behaviors during the development of the dopaminergic system. Development 141(3):661-73. [PubMed: 24449842]  [MGI Ref ID J:208337]

Bovenschen N; Mertens K; Hu L; Havekes LM; van Vlijmen BJ. 2005. LDL receptor cooperates with LDL receptor-related protein in regulating plasma levels of coagulation factor VIII in vivo. Blood 106(3):906-12. [PubMed: 15840700]  [MGI Ref ID J:117317]

Bovenschen N; van Dijk KW; Havekes LM; Mertens K; van Vlijmen BJ. 2004. Clearance of coagulation factor VIII in very low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice. Br J Haematol 126(5):722-5. [PubMed: 15327526]  [MGI Ref ID J:109394]

Cariboni A; Rakic S; Liapi A; Maggi R; Goffinet A; Parnavelas JG. 2005. Reelin provides an inhibitory signal in the migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons. Development 132(21):4709-18. [PubMed: 16207762]  [MGI Ref ID J:102848]

Chang B; Hawes NL; Hurd RE; Wang J; Howell D; Davisson MT; Roderick TH; Nusinowitz S; Heckenlively JR. 2005. Mouse models of ocular diseases. Vis Neurosci 22(5):587-93. [PubMed: 16332269]  [MGI Ref ID J:156373]

Chen Y; Hu Y; Lu K; Flannery JG; Ma JX. 2007. Very low density lipoprotein receptor, a negative regulator of the wnt signaling pathway and choroidal neovascularization. J Biol Chem 282(47):34420-8. [PubMed: 17890782]  [MGI Ref ID J:128338]

Deane R; Sagare A; Hamm K; Parisi M; Lane S; Finn MB; Holtzman DM; Zlokovic BV. 2008. apoE isoform-specific disruption of amyloid beta peptide clearance from mouse brain. J Clin Invest 118(12):4002-13. [PubMed: 19033669]  [MGI Ref ID J:144730]

Dierssen M; Arque G; McDonald J; Andreu N; Martinez-Cue C; Florez J; Fillat C. 2011. Behavioral characterization of a mouse model overexpressing DSCR1/ RCAN1. PLoS One 6(2):e17010. [PubMed: 21364922]  [MGI Ref ID J:171071]

Fish KN; Krucker T. 2008. Functional consequences of hippocampal neuronal ectopia in the apolipoprotein E receptor-2 knockout mouse. Neurobiol Dis 32(3):391-401. [PubMed: 18778775]  [MGI Ref ID J:142541]

Frykman PK; Brown MS; Yamamoto T; Goldstein JL; Herz J. 1995. Normal plasma lipoproteins and fertility in gene-targeted mice homozygous for a disruption in the gene encoding very low density lipoprotein receptor. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 92(18):8453-7. [PubMed: 7667310]  [MGI Ref ID J:28591]

Gebhardt C; Del Turco D; Drakew A; Tielsch A; Herz J; Frotscher M; Deller T. 2002. Abnormal positioning of granule cells alters afferent fiber distribution in the mouse fascia dentata: Morphologic evidence from reeler, apolipoprotein E receptor 2-, and very low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice. J Comp Neurol 445(3):278-92. [PubMed: 11920707]  [MGI Ref ID J:75080]

Goudriaan JR; Tacken PJ; Dahlmans VE; Gijbels MJ; van Dijk KW; Havekes LM; Jong MC. 2001. Protection from obesity in mice lacking the VLDL receptor. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 21(9):1488-93. [PubMed: 11557677]  [MGI Ref ID J:102939]

Hack I; Hellwig S; Junghans D; Brunne B; Bock HH; Zhao S; Frotscher M. 2007. Divergent roles of ApoER2 and Vldlr in the migration of cortical neurons. Development 134(21):3883-91. [PubMed: 17913789]  [MGI Ref ID J:126335]

Hashimoto-Torii K; Torii M; Sarkisian MR; Bartley CM; Shen J; Radtke F; Gridley T; Sestan N; Rakic P. 2008. Interaction between Reelin and Notch signaling regulates neuronal migration in the cerebral cortex. Neuron 60(2):273-84. [PubMed: 18957219]  [MGI Ref ID J:144065]

Heckenlively JR; Hawes NL; Friedlander M; Nusinowitz S; Hurd R; Davisson M; Chang B. 2003. Mouse model of subretinal neovascularization with choroidal anastomosis. Retina 23(4):518-22. [PubMed: 12972764]  [MGI Ref ID J:114757]

Hiesberger T; Trommsdorff M; Howell BW; Goffinet A; Mumby MC; Cooper JA; Herz J. 1999. Direct binding of Reelin to VLDL receptor and ApoE receptor 2 induces tyrosine phosphorylation of disabled-1 and modulates tau phosphorylation. Neuron 24(2):481-9. [PubMed: 10571241]  [MGI Ref ID J:212819]

Hu L; van der Hoogt CC; Espirito Santo SM; Out R; Kypreos KE; van Vlijmen BJ; Van Berkel TJ; Romijn JA; Havekes LM; van Dijk KW; Rensen PC. 2008. The hepatic uptake of VLDL in lrp-ldlr-/-vldlr-/- mice is regulated by LPL activity and involves proteoglycans and SR-BI. J Lipid Res 49(7):1553-61. [PubMed: 18367731]  [MGI Ref ID J:138462]

Hu W; Jiang A; Liang J; Meng H; Chang B; Gao H; Qiao X. 2008. Expression of VLDLR in the retina and evolution of subretinal neovascularization in the knockout mouse model's retinal angiomatous proliferation. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 49(1):407-15. [PubMed: 18172119]  [MGI Ref ID J:132497]

Hu Y; Chen Y; Lin M; Lee K; Mott RA; Ma JX. 2013. Pathogenic role of the Wnt signaling pathway activation in laser-induced choroidal neovascularization. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 54(1):141-54. [PubMed: 23211829]  [MGI Ref ID J:214579]

Hua J; Guerin KI; Chen J; Michan S; Stahl A; Krah NM; Seaward MR; Dennison RJ; Juan AM; Hatton CJ; Sapieha P; Sinclair DA; Smith LE. 2011. Resveratrol inhibits pathologic retinal neovascularization in vldlr-/- mice. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 52(5):2809-16. [PubMed: 21282584]  [MGI Ref ID J:171523]

Jiang A; Hu W; Meng H; Gao H; Qiao X. 2009. Loss of VLDL receptor activates retinal vascular endothelial cells and promotes angiogenesis. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 50(2):844-50. [PubMed: 18936153]  [MGI Ref ID J:146685]

Jossin Y; Gui L; Goffinet AM. 2007. Processing of Reelin by embryonic neurons is important for function in tissue but not in dissociated cultured neurons. J Neurosci 27(16):4243-52. [PubMed: 17442808]  [MGI Ref ID J:121108]

Kruger MT; Zhao S; Chai X; Brunne B; Bouche E; Bock HH; Frotscher M. 2010. Role for Reelin-induced cofilin phosphorylation in the assembly of sympathetic preganglionic neurons in the murine intermediolateral column. Eur J Neurosci 32(10):1611-7. [PubMed: 21039973]  [MGI Ref ID J:169495]

Kyosseva SV; Chen L; Seal S; McGinnis JF. 2013. Nanoceria inhibit expression of genes associated with inflammation and angiogenesis in the retina of Vldlr null mice. Exp Eye Res 116:63-74. [PubMed: 23978600]  [MGI Ref ID J:210396]

Larouche M; Beffert U; Herz J; Hawkes R. 2008. The reelin receptors apoer2 and vldlr coordinate the patterning of purkinje cell topography in the developing mouse cerebellum. PLoS ONE 3(2):e1653. [PubMed: 18301736]  [MGI Ref ID J:132885]

Leemhuis J; Bouche E; Frotscher M; Henle F; Hein L; Herz J; Meyer DK; Pichler M; Roth G; Schwan C; Bock HH. 2010. Reelin signals through apolipoprotein E receptor 2 and Cdc42 to increase growth cone motility and filopodia formation. J Neurosci 30(44):14759-72. [PubMed: 21048135]  [MGI Ref ID J:166701]

Li C; Huang Z; Kingsley R; Zhou X; Li F; Parke DW 2nd; Cao W. 2007. Biochemical alterations in the retinas of very low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice: an animal model of retinal angiomatous proliferation. Arch Ophthalmol 125(6):795-803. [PubMed: 17562991]  [MGI Ref ID J:128315]

McKenzie JA; Fruttiger M; Abraham S; Lange CA; Stone J; Gandhi P; Wang X; Bainbridge J; Moss SE; Greenwood J. 2012. Apelin is required for non-neovascular remodeling in the retina. Am J Pathol 180(1):399-409. [PubMed: 22067912]  [MGI Ref ID J:180164]

Nakajima C; Kulik A; Frotscher M; Herz J; Schafer M; Bock HH; May P. 2013. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) modulates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent intracellular signaling and NMDA-induced regulation of postsynaptic protein complexes. J Biol Chem 288(30):21909-23. [PubMed: 23760271]  [MGI Ref ID J:201767]

Nguyen A; Tao H; Metrione M; Hajri T. 2014. Very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) expression is a determinant factor in adipose tissue inflammation and adipocyte-macrophage interaction. J Biol Chem 289(3):1688-703. [PubMed: 24293365]  [MGI Ref ID J:207175]

Park K; Lee K; Zhang B; Zhou T; He X; Gao G; Murray AR; Ma JX. 2011. Identification of a novel inhibitor of the canonical wnt pathway. Mol Cell Biol 31(14):3038-51. [PubMed: 21576363]  [MGI Ref ID J:174092]

Perman JC; Bostrom P; Lindbom M; Lidberg U; StAhlman M; Hagg D; Lindskog H; Scharin Tang M; Omerovic E; Mattsson Hulten L; Jeppsson A; Petursson P; Herlitz J; Olivecrona G; Strickland DK; Ekroos K; Olofsson SO; Boren J. 2011. The VLDL receptor promotes lipotoxicity and increases mortality in mice following an acute myocardial infarction. J Clin Invest 121(7):2625-40. [PubMed: 21670500]  [MGI Ref ID J:175645]

Rossel M; Loulier K; Feuillet C; Alonso S; Carroll P. 2005. Reelin signaling is necessary for a specific step in the migration of hindbrain efferent neurons. Development 132(6):1175-85. [PubMed: 15703280]  [MGI Ref ID J:97218]

Roubtsova A; Munkonda MN; Awan Z; Marcinkiewicz J; Chamberland A; Lazure C; Cianflone K; Seidah NG; Prat A. 2011. Circulating proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) regulates VLDLR protein and triglyceride accumulation in visceral adipose tissue. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 31(4):785-91. [PubMed: 21273557]  [MGI Ref ID J:184166]

Senturk A; Pfennig S; Weiss A; Burk K; Acker-Palmer A. 2011. Ephrin Bs are essential components of the Reelin pathway to regulate neuronal migration. Nature 472(7343):356-60. [PubMed: 21460838]  [MGI Ref ID J:171375]

Singh I; Sagare AP; Coma M; Perlmutter D; Gelein R; Bell RD; Deane RJ; Zhong E; Parisi M; Ciszewski J; Kasper RT; Deane R. 2013. Low levels of copper disrupt brain amyloid-beta homeostasis by altering its production and clearance. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110(36):14771-6. [PubMed: 23959870]  [MGI Ref ID J:200976]

Su J; Klemm MA; Josephson AM; Fox MA. 2013. Contributions of VLDLR and LRP8 in the establishment of retinogeniculate projections. Neural Dev 8:11. [PubMed: 23758727]  [MGI Ref ID J:199170]

Tacken PJ; Teusink B; Jong MC; Harats D; Havekes LM; van Dijk KW; Hofker MH. 2000. LDL receptor deficiency unmasks altered VLDL triglyceride metabolism in VLDL receptor transgenic and knockout mice J Lipid Res 41(12):2055-62. [PubMed: 11108739]  [MGI Ref ID J:66431]

Tao H; Aakula S; Abumrad NN; Hajri T. 2010. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma regulates the expression and function of very-low-density lipoprotein receptor. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 298(1):E68-79. [PubMed: 19861583]  [MGI Ref ID J:170136]

Tao H; Hajri T. 2011. Very low density lipoprotein receptor promotes adipocyte differentiation and mediates the proadipogenic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists. Biochem Pharmacol 82(12):1950-62. [PubMed: 21924248]  [MGI Ref ID J:178736]

Trommsdorff M; Gotthardt M; Hiesberger T; Shelton J; Stockinger W ; Nimpf J ; Hammer RE ; Richardson JA ; Herz J. 1999. Reeler/Disabled-like disruption of neuronal migration in knockout mice lacking the VLDL receptor and ApoE receptor 2. Cell 97(6):689-701. [PubMed: 10380922]  [MGI Ref ID J:55691]

Trotter JH; Klein M; Jinwal UK; Abisambra JF; Dickey CA; Tharkur J; Masiulis I; Ding J; Locke KG; Rickman CB; Birch DG; Weeber EJ; Herz J. 2011. ApoER2 Function in the Establishment and Maintenance of Retinal Synaptic Connectivity. J Neurosci 31(40):14413-14423. [PubMed: 21976526]  [MGI Ref ID J:177435]

Uchida T; Baba A; Perez-Martinez FJ; Hibi T; Miyata T; Luque JM; Nakajima K; Hattori M. 2009. Downregulation of functional Reelin receptors in projection neurons implies that primary Reelin action occurs at early/premigratory stages. J Neurosci 29(34):10653-62. [PubMed: 19710317]  [MGI Ref ID J:152314]

Wang X; Abraham S; McKenzie JA; Jeffs N; Swire M; Tripathi VB; Luhmann UF; Lange CA; Zhai Z; Arthur HM; Bainbridge JW; Moss SE; Greenwood J. 2013. LRG1 promotes angiogenesis by modulating endothelial TGF-beta signalling. Nature 499(7458):306-11. [PubMed: 23868260]  [MGI Ref ID J:204744]

Weeber EJ; Beffert U; Jones C; Christian JM; Forster E; Sweatt JD; Herz J. 2002. Reelin and ApoE Receptors Cooperate to Enhance Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity and Learning. J Biol Chem 277(42):39944-52. [PubMed: 12167620]  [MGI Ref ID J:79593]

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Westenskow PD; Kurihara T; Aguilar E; Scheppke EL; Moreno SK; Wittgrove C; Marchetti V; Michael IP; Anand S; Nagy A; Cheresh D; Friedlander M. 2013. Ras pathway inhibition prevents neovascularization by repressing endothelial cell sprouting. J Clin Invest :. [PubMed: 24084735]  [MGI Ref ID J:203993]

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Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Room Number           A1

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryThis strain is maintained by homozygous sibling matings. Expected coat color from breeding:Black
Mating SystemHomozygote x Homozygote         (Female x Male)   01-MAR-06
Diet Information LabDiet® 5K52/5K67

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $143.65Female or MaleHomozygous for Vldlrtm1Her  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$287.30Homozygous for Vldlrtm1Her x Homozygous for Vldlrtm1Her  

Standard Supply

Research Strain. Availability determined by The Jackson Laboratory scientist holding the strain.

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $186.80Female or MaleHomozygous for Vldlrtm1Her  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$373.50Homozygous for Vldlrtm1Her x Homozygous for Vldlrtm1Her  

Standard Supply

Research Strain. Availability determined by The Jackson Laboratory scientist holding the strain.

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Research Strain. Availability determined by The Jackson Laboratory scientist holding the strain.

General Supply Notes

Control Information

  Control
   101045 B6129SF2/J (approximate)
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

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The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
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JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

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In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

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The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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