Strain Name:

C.129S2(B6)-Cxcr2tm1Mwm/J

Stock Number:

002724

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Homozygous mice for the Cxcr2tm1Mwm knock-out have splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and impaired neutrophil migration. They may be useful for studies of inflammatory diseases.

Description

Strain Information

Former Names C.129S2(B6)-Il8rbtm1Mwm/J    (Changed: 30-NOV-09 )
Cmkar2tm    (Changed: 15-DEC-04 )
IL8R    (Changed: 15-DEC-04 )
Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
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Mating SystemHomozygote x Heterozygote         (Female x Male)   26-FEB-08
Specieslaboratory mouse
Background Strain BALB/c
Donor Strain B6;129S-Il8rbtm1Mwm (129S2 derived D3 ES cell line)
GenerationN10F4 (27-DEC-13)
Generation Definitions
 
Donating InvestigatorDr. Mark W. Moore,   Deltagen

Appearance
albino
Related Genotype: A/A Tyrp1b/Tyrp1b Tyrc/Tyrc

Description
Mice homozygous for this targeted mutation are viable and fertile although the reproductive rate is lower than normal wildtype siblings. Homozygous mutant mice have splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and impaired neutrophil migration. Formerly referred to as Cmkar2, chemokine (C-X-C) receptor 2; also called Il8r, interleukin 8 receptor.

Control Information

  Control
   000651 BALB/cJ
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying   Cxcr2tm1Mwm allele
006848   B6.129S2(C)-Cxcr2tm1Mwm/J
013043   SJL.129S2(C)-Cxcr2tm1Mwm/RmraJ
View Strains carrying   Cxcr2tm1Mwm     (2 strains)

Strains carrying other alleles of Cxcr2
024638   C57BL/6-Cxcr2tm1Rmra/J
View Strains carrying other alleles of Cxcr2     (1 strain)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Cxcr2tm1Mwm/Cxcr2+

        C.129S2(B6)-Cxcr2tm1Mwm/J
  • immune system phenotype
  • impaired neutrophil recruitment
    • heterozygotes subjected to excisional wounds exhibit a diminished neutrophil recruitment into the wound site   (MGI Ref ID J:63935)
    • heterozygotes exhibit an intermediate myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity on postwound days 1 and 2 and an intermediate delay in neutrophil influx for postwound days 3-4 as compared with homozygotes or wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:63935)
    • strikingly, heterozygotes exhibit a delayed increase in neutrophil count compared with wild-type mice; moreover, MPO activity does not correlate with neutrophil number on postwound day 7   (MGI Ref ID J:63935)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • delayed wound healing
    • heterozygotes exposed to excisional punch biopsy show a delayed cutaneous healing response that is intermediary relative to wild-type and homozygous mutant mice   (MGI Ref ID J:63935)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • impaired neutrophil recruitment
    • heterozygotes subjected to excisional wounds exhibit a diminished neutrophil recruitment into the wound site   (MGI Ref ID J:63935)
    • heterozygotes exhibit an intermediate myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity on postwound days 1 and 2 and an intermediate delay in neutrophil influx for postwound days 3-4 as compared with homozygotes or wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:63935)
    • strikingly, heterozygotes exhibit a delayed increase in neutrophil count compared with wild-type mice; moreover, MPO activity does not correlate with neutrophil number on postwound day 7   (MGI Ref ID J:63935)

Cxcr2tm1Mwm/Cxcr2tm1Mwm

        C.129S2(B6)-Cxcr2tm1Mwm/J
  • mortality/aging
  • decreased sensitivity to induced morbidity/mortality
    • in a model of septic peritonitis provoked by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), homozygotes are significantly protected from CLP-induced tissue injury and mortality relative to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:85647)
    • in this model, enhanced survival is associated with higher resting and CLP-induced levels of peritoneal CXCL10   (MGI Ref ID J:85647)
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal chemokine level
    • after conidia challenge, whole lung levels of eotaxin/small chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 11 are significantly reduced in A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
  • abnormal cytokine secretion
    • homozygotes infected with Toxoplasma gondii show reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines, as shown by lowered TNF and IFN-gamma responses in spleen   (MGI Ref ID J:72824)
  • abnormal interleukin level
    • after conidia challenge, whole lung levels of IL-4 and IL-5 are significantly reduced in A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
    • whole lung levels of IL-12 are reduced at all time points after conidia challenge; however, these differences become significant only at days 7 and 37 post-challenge   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
    • levels of both mRNA and IL-6 protein levels in HSV-infected corneas of mutant mice are higher (up to 100-fold) than those in wild-type infected corneas   (MGI Ref ID J:87365)
  • abnormal leukocyte physiology
    • chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 5 (CXCL5; GCP-2) has little or no effect on resting wild-type or mutant lymphocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:94170)
    • however, CXCL5 significantly increases the expression of CD28 by CD3epsilon-stimulated lymphocytes from wild-type but not from mutant mice   (MGI Ref ID J:94170)
    • similar to the induction of CD28 expression, CXCL5 modestly increases the expression of CD80 and CD86 by B220+ B cells from wild-type but not from mutant mice costimulated by anti-CD3epsilon, mAb-treated T cells in culture   (MGI Ref ID J:94170)
    • abnormal T cell physiology
      • after conidial challenge, A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes display impaired T cell, but not neutrophil, recruitment into the airways relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
      • abnormal NK T cell physiology
        • after intraocular OVA inoculation, homozygotes show no accumulation of NKT cells in their spleens and are unable to generate Ag-specific T regulatory cells; peripheral tolerance is thus prevented   (MGI Ref ID J:66399)
        • untreated homozygotes display reduced numbers of splenic NKT cells relative to wild-type mice, suggesting impaired development or basal trafficking of NKT cells to lymphoid organs   (MGI Ref ID J:66399)
      • abnormal T-helper 1 physiology
        • A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes show significant increases in various Th1-associated chemokines and cytokines (IP-10/CXCL10, MIG/CXCL9, and IFN-gamma) at various times after conidia challenge   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
      • abnormal T-helper 2 physiology
        • unlike wild-type mice, A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes fail to exhibit a robust Th2 response after conidia challenge   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
    • abnormal eosinophil physiology
      • after conidial challenge, A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes exhibit impaired eosinophil recruitment into the airways relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
    • abnormal neutrophil physiology
      • at day 3 after conidia challenge, A. fumigatus-sensitized mutants display increased neutrophil activation (based on MPO levels) relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
      • surprisingly, neutrophil recruitment into the airways of sensitized mutants is comparable with that of sensitized wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
      • TNF-treated homozygotes retain normal levels of neutrophil arrest in inflamed venules relative to BALB/c wild-type mice; however, treatment with anti-E-selectin mAb reduces neutrophil adhesion to approximately baseline levels   (MGI Ref ID J:93946)
      • impaired neutrophil chemotaxis
        • in response to infection with uropathogenic E. coli, mutant neutrophils fail to cross the epithelial barrier, accumulate in the tissues, and eventually cause renal scarring   (MGI Ref ID J:65905)
        • mutant neutrophils fail to migrate into the peritoneal cavity during early infection with Toxoplasma gondii; tachyzoite numbers are increased and PMN influx remains defective 36 h post-infection   (MGI Ref ID J:72824)
      • impaired neutrophil recruitment
        • homozygotes subjected to excisional wounds exhibit a significantly diminished neutrophil recruitment into the wound site, as shown by both myeloperoxidase assay and cell count   (MGI Ref ID J:63935)
        • in response to intravesical inoculation with E. coli, homozygotes display delayed neutrophil recruitment and subepithelial neutrophil accumulation during the first 7 days post-infection; neutrophils fail to cross the epithelium into the urine and neutrophil numbers excreted into the urine remain low at all times   (MGI Ref ID J:65425)
        • in response to infection with Pneumocystis sp., homozygotes exhibit a significantly reduced accumulation of neutrophils in the alveolar compartments (only 5-10% of wild-type); however, no major differences in pulmonary pathology are observed   (MGI Ref ID J:93116)
    • increased IgE level
      • A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes show significantly increased serum levels of IgE at days 7 and 37 after conidia, but not at any other times during the course of chronic fungal asthma   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
      • notably, IgG1 levels remain unaffected at all times after conidia challenge   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
  • decreased susceptibility to fungal infection
    • homozygotes sensitized to soluble A. fumigatus antigens are not susceptible to the lethal effects of a conidia challenge   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
    • in contrast to wild-type, A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes fail to exhibit persistent airway signs of chronic fungal asthma   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
    • no peribronchial inflammation, goblet cell hyperplasia, or fungal overgrowth is observed   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
  • decreased susceptibility to induced arthritis
    • there is a signifcant decrease in clinical measurements of joint inflammation induced by Tg(TcraR28,TcrbR28)KRNDim (i.e. K/BxN) mouse serum compared to C57BL/6 controls   (MGI Ref ID J:142880)
    • ankle thickness is also half that of controls 9 days after arthritis induction   (MGI Ref ID J:142880)
  • increased susceptibility to bacterial infection
    • in response to infection with uropathogenic E. coli, homozygotes show an intact initial chemokine production, but display a diffuse CXCL2 (MIP-2) distribution at later time points   (MGI Ref ID J:65905)
    • at 7 days post-infection, homozygotes show impaired clearance of bacteria and acute pyelonephritic changes (i.e. edema, increased renal size, hyperemia, neutrophil influx, and abscess formation); some animals die of systemic infection   (MGI Ref ID J:65905)
    • at 35 days post-infection, kidneys of surviving mutants are pale and show parenchymal thinning, loss of cortical tissue, abscesses, fibrosis and diffuse inflammatory infiltrates   (MGI Ref ID J:65905)
  • increased susceptibility to parasitic infection
    • homozygotes exhibit an increased susceptibility to infection with Toxoplasma gondii, associated with rapid tachyzoite infection and replication   (MGI Ref ID J:72824)
    • at 30 days post-infection, mutant brains harbor ~5-fold greater cyst numbers than wild-type infected mice   (MGI Ref ID J:72824)
  • increased susceptibility to viral infection
    • homozygotes are more susceptible to HSV-induced ocular lesions, show impaired viral clearance, and develop severe herpetic stromal keratitis upon exposure to a dose of HSV that is minimally pathogenic to BALB/c wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:87365)
  • respiratory system phenotype
  • abnormal airway responsiveness
    • at days 3 and 7 after conidia challenge, A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes show significantly increased methacholine-induced airway hyperreactivity than wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
    • in contrast, mutants display significantly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness than wild-type mice at days 14 and 37 after conidia   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
    • decreased airway responsiveness
      • unlike wild-type mice, homozygotes fail to develop respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness after a methacholine challenge at all time points tested   (MGI Ref ID J:82293)
  • abnormal respiratory mucosa goblet cell morphology
    • RSV-infected homozygotes display reduced goblet cell hyperplasia and a notable suppression in mucus production (based on decreased PAS+ staining and mucus in the BALF) relative to RSV-infected wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:82293)
  • vision/eye phenotype
  • corneal vascularization
    • in HSV-infected corneas of mutant mice, abnormal IL-6 response is associated with enhanced corneal neovascularization (VEGFA induction)   (MGI Ref ID J:87365)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal myelination
    • in wild-type mice, myelin is distributed uniformly throughout the developing spinal cord white matter; in contrast, in mutants, myelin is concentrated at the periphery and deeper regions of white matter contain few myelin sheaths   (MGI Ref ID J:78470)
  • abnormal spinal cord morphology
    • in homozygotes, developing spinal cords contain reduced oligodendrocytes, abnormally localized at the periphery   (MGI Ref ID J:78470)
  • decreased oligodendrocyte progenitor number
    • at P7, homozygotes exhibit fewer differentiated spinal cord oligodendrocytes, despite normal migration to the ventral presumptive white matter   (MGI Ref ID J:78470)
    • the remaining oligodendrocytes are abnormally displaced to the pial surface of the spinal cord   (MGI Ref ID J:78470)
    • reduced oligodendrocyte number is associated with decreased precursor proliferation in the white matter, and is partially compensated by decreased cell death   (MGI Ref ID J:78470)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal chemokine level
    • after conidia challenge, whole lung levels of eotaxin/small chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 11 are significantly reduced in A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
  • abnormal interleukin level
    • after conidia challenge, whole lung levels of IL-4 and IL-5 are significantly reduced in A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
    • whole lung levels of IL-12 are reduced at all time points after conidia challenge; however, these differences become significant only at days 7 and 37 post-challenge   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
    • levels of both mRNA and IL-6 protein levels in HSV-infected corneas of mutant mice are higher (up to 100-fold) than those in wild-type infected corneas   (MGI Ref ID J:87365)
  • delayed wound healing
    • homozygotes exposed to excisional punch biopsy show a delayed cutaneous healing response   (MGI Ref ID J:63935)
    • mutants show impaired neovascularization, reduced neutrophil recruitment, abnormal monocyte recruitment, and decreased secretion of IL-1beta into the wound bed   (MGI Ref ID J:63935)
    • also, primary cultures of mutant keratinocytes exhibit a delayed in vitro wound closure relative to wild-type, indicating a defective migration and proliferative response to wounding   (MGI Ref ID J:63935)
  • skeleton phenotype
  • decreased susceptibility to induced arthritis
    • there is a signifcant decrease in clinical measurements of joint inflammation induced by Tg(TcraR28,TcrbR28)KRNDim (i.e. K/BxN) mouse serum compared to C57BL/6 controls   (MGI Ref ID J:142880)
    • ankle thickness is also half that of controls 9 days after arthritis induction   (MGI Ref ID J:142880)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • corneal vascularization
    • in HSV-infected corneas of mutant mice, abnormal IL-6 response is associated with enhanced corneal neovascularization (VEGFA induction)   (MGI Ref ID J:87365)
  • cellular phenotype
  • impaired neutrophil chemotaxis
    • in response to infection with uropathogenic E. coli, mutant neutrophils fail to cross the epithelial barrier, accumulate in the tissues, and eventually cause renal scarring   (MGI Ref ID J:65905)
    • mutant neutrophils fail to migrate into the peritoneal cavity during early infection with Toxoplasma gondii; tachyzoite numbers are increased and PMN influx remains defective 36 h post-infection   (MGI Ref ID J:72824)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte physiology
    • chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 5 (CXCL5; GCP-2) has little or no effect on resting wild-type or mutant lymphocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:94170)
    • however, CXCL5 significantly increases the expression of CD28 by CD3epsilon-stimulated lymphocytes from wild-type but not from mutant mice   (MGI Ref ID J:94170)
    • similar to the induction of CD28 expression, CXCL5 modestly increases the expression of CD80 and CD86 by B220+ B cells from wild-type but not from mutant mice costimulated by anti-CD3epsilon, mAb-treated T cells in culture   (MGI Ref ID J:94170)
    • abnormal T cell physiology
      • after conidial challenge, A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes display impaired T cell, but not neutrophil, recruitment into the airways relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
      • abnormal NK T cell physiology
        • after intraocular OVA inoculation, homozygotes show no accumulation of NKT cells in their spleens and are unable to generate Ag-specific T regulatory cells; peripheral tolerance is thus prevented   (MGI Ref ID J:66399)
        • untreated homozygotes display reduced numbers of splenic NKT cells relative to wild-type mice, suggesting impaired development or basal trafficking of NKT cells to lymphoid organs   (MGI Ref ID J:66399)
      • abnormal T-helper 1 physiology
        • A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes show significant increases in various Th1-associated chemokines and cytokines (IP-10/CXCL10, MIG/CXCL9, and IFN-gamma) at various times after conidia challenge   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
      • abnormal T-helper 2 physiology
        • unlike wild-type mice, A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes fail to exhibit a robust Th2 response after conidia challenge   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
    • abnormal eosinophil physiology
      • after conidial challenge, A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes exhibit impaired eosinophil recruitment into the airways relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
    • abnormal neutrophil physiology
      • at day 3 after conidia challenge, A. fumigatus-sensitized mutants display increased neutrophil activation (based on MPO levels) relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
      • surprisingly, neutrophil recruitment into the airways of sensitized mutants is comparable with that of sensitized wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
      • TNF-treated homozygotes retain normal levels of neutrophil arrest in inflamed venules relative to BALB/c wild-type mice; however, treatment with anti-E-selectin mAb reduces neutrophil adhesion to approximately baseline levels   (MGI Ref ID J:93946)
      • impaired neutrophil chemotaxis
        • in response to infection with uropathogenic E. coli, mutant neutrophils fail to cross the epithelial barrier, accumulate in the tissues, and eventually cause renal scarring   (MGI Ref ID J:65905)
        • mutant neutrophils fail to migrate into the peritoneal cavity during early infection with Toxoplasma gondii; tachyzoite numbers are increased and PMN influx remains defective 36 h post-infection   (MGI Ref ID J:72824)
      • impaired neutrophil recruitment
        • homozygotes subjected to excisional wounds exhibit a significantly diminished neutrophil recruitment into the wound site, as shown by both myeloperoxidase assay and cell count   (MGI Ref ID J:63935)
        • in response to intravesical inoculation with E. coli, homozygotes display delayed neutrophil recruitment and subepithelial neutrophil accumulation during the first 7 days post-infection; neutrophils fail to cross the epithelium into the urine and neutrophil numbers excreted into the urine remain low at all times   (MGI Ref ID J:65425)
        • in response to infection with Pneumocystis sp., homozygotes exhibit a significantly reduced accumulation of neutrophils in the alveolar compartments (only 5-10% of wild-type); however, no major differences in pulmonary pathology are observed   (MGI Ref ID J:93116)
    • increased IgE level
      • A. fumigatus-sensitized homozygotes show significantly increased serum levels of IgE at days 7 and 37 after conidia, but not at any other times during the course of chronic fungal asthma   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)
      • notably, IgG1 levels remain unaffected at all times after conidia challenge   (MGI Ref ID J:73947)

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Cxcr2tm1Mwm/Cxcr2tm1Mwm

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * C57BL/6J
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • *normal* hematopoietic system phenotype
    • despite myeloid hyperplasia of the marrow, homozygotes are not anemic, contain normal amounts of erythrocytes and hemoglobin, a normal hematocrit value, and do not display an increase in nucleated red blood cells   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
    • abnormal myelopoiesis
      • the presence of metamyelocytes, bands and neutrophils in normal ratios suggests that extramedullary myelopoiesis occurs in the liver, lymph node and spleen   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
      • abnormal granulocyte differentiation
        • ~25% of homozygotes display multiple foci of granulopoiesis in the periportal region of the liver   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
        • however, no signs of parenchymal infiltration, inflammation or hepatic damage are observed   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
      • myeloid hyperplasia
        • homozygotes show a significant increase in bone marrow cellularity composed of the normal myeloid maturation series; the erythroid series remains unchanged   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
    • abnormal spleen white pulp morphology
      • spenomegaly results from expansion of the splenic white pulp by proliferation of myeloid elements (metamyelocytes, bands and neutrophils) and megakaryocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
    • enlarged spleen
      • at necropsy, all homozygotes display a 2-4-fold increase in spleen size relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
      • in contrast, the thymus and all other organs remain grossly normal   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
    • impaired neutrophil chemotaxis
      • mutant neutrophils show a normal locomotor function and are effective at intracellular and extracellular killing of bacteria   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
      • however, mutant neutrophils fail to chemotax in response to CXCL2 (MIP-2), and show impaired migration in response to thioglycollate injection; the number of mutant neutrophils that migrates to the peritoneum is one-fifth that of wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
    • increased B cell number
      • homozygotes display a ~10-fold increase in B cells relative to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
    • increased neutrophil cell number
      • homozygotes show a ~12-fold increase in circulating neutrophils relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal myelopoiesis
    • the presence of metamyelocytes, bands and neutrophils in normal ratios suggests that extramedullary myelopoiesis occurs in the liver, lymph node and spleen   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
    • abnormal granulocyte differentiation
      • ~25% of homozygotes display multiple foci of granulopoiesis in the periportal region of the liver   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
      • however, no signs of parenchymal infiltration, inflammation or hepatic damage are observed   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
    • myeloid hyperplasia
      • homozygotes show a significant increase in bone marrow cellularity composed of the normal myeloid maturation series; the erythroid series remains unchanged   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
  • abnormal spleen white pulp morphology
    • spenomegaly results from expansion of the splenic white pulp by proliferation of myeloid elements (metamyelocytes, bands and neutrophils) and megakaryocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
  • enlarged cervical lymph nodes
    • all homozygotes exhibit enlarged cervical lymph nodes (3- to 10-fold)   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
    • in contrast, mutant inguinal and popliteal lymph nodes appear grossly normal   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
  • enlarged lymph nodes
    • most mutant lymph nodes are enlarged; however, the degree of enlargement varies among individual mice   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
  • enlarged spleen
    • at necropsy, all homozygotes display a 2-4-fold increase in spleen size relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
    • in contrast, the thymus and all other organs remain grossly normal   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
  • impaired neutrophil chemotaxis
    • mutant neutrophils show a normal locomotor function and are effective at intracellular and extracellular killing of bacteria   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
    • however, mutant neutrophils fail to chemotax in response to CXCL2 (MIP-2), and show impaired migration in response to thioglycollate injection; the number of mutant neutrophils that migrates to the peritoneum is one-fifth that of wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
  • increased B cell number
    • homozygotes display a ~10-fold increase in B cells relative to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
  • increased circulating interleukin-6 level
    • homozygotes display significantly high serum levels of IL-6 (average of 4.8 ng/ml) relative to wild-type mice (below 0.1 ng/ml)   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
  • increased neutrophil cell number
    • homozygotes show a ~12-fold increase in circulating neutrophils relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
  • lymph node medullary cord hyperplasia
    • in lymph nodes, the medullary cords are expanded by multiple foci of myelopoiesis, Russell bodies, and plasma cells, compressing the adjacent medullary sinuses   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
  • skeleton phenotype
  • abnormal bone marrow morphology
    • in homozygotes, the femur and tibia exhibit a grossly white marrow as opposed to the normal red marrow found in wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • increased circulating interleukin-6 level
    • homozygotes display significantly high serum levels of IL-6 (average of 4.8 ng/ml) relative to wild-type mice (below 0.1 ng/ml)   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal granulocyte differentiation
    • ~25% of homozygotes display multiple foci of granulopoiesis in the periportal region of the liver   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
    • however, no signs of parenchymal infiltration, inflammation or hepatic damage are observed   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
  • impaired neutrophil chemotaxis
    • mutant neutrophils show a normal locomotor function and are effective at intracellular and extracellular killing of bacteria   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)
    • however, mutant neutrophils fail to chemotax in response to CXCL2 (MIP-2), and show impaired migration in response to thioglycollate injection; the number of mutant neutrophils that migrates to the peritoneum is one-fifth that of wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:19570)

Cxcr2tm1Mwm/Cxcr2tm1Mwm

        B6.Cg-Il8rbtm1Mwm
  • tumorigenesis
  • altered tumor morphology
    • in homozygotes, heterotopic LLC tumors display increased tumor necrosis relative to wild-type controls   (MGI Ref ID J:88233)
    • at 4 weeks, heterotopic LCC tumors from mutant mice exhibit reduced tumor angiogenesis but no differences on intratumor leukocyte infiltration relative to tumors from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:88233)
    • decreased tumor growth/size
      • homozygotes exhibit inhibition of both heterotopic and orthotopic Lewis lung cancer (LLC) primary tumor growth over 4 weeks relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:88233)
  • decreased metastatic potential
    • at 4 weeks, homozygotes show a significant reduction in spontaneous lung metastases of heterotopic LCC tumors relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:88233)

Cxcr2tm1Mwm/Cxcr2tm1Mwm

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * BALB/c
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • decreased body size
    • female knockouts have slightly lower body weights than wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal myelopoiesis
    • a marked increase in extramedullary myelopoiesis is observed compared to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • abnormal neutrophil physiology
    • intradermal injection of human or mouse chemokines does not induce accumulation of neutrophils in the skin, in contrast to wild-type or knockin mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • decreased thymus weight
    • male and female mice have slightly decreased thymus weights at 9 weeks   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • extramedullary hematopoiesis
    • a moderate increase is observed vs wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • increased granulocyte number
    • marked increase in absolute neutrophilic granulocyte count is seen in females   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • increased spleen weight
    • a significant increase (~165 mg) in spleen weight is observed compared to wild-type (95 mg)   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal myelopoiesis
    • a marked increase in extramedullary myelopoiesis is observed compared to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • abnormal neutrophil physiology
    • intradermal injection of human or mouse chemokines does not induce accumulation of neutrophils in the skin, in contrast to wild-type or knockin mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • decreased thymus weight
    • male and female mice have slightly decreased thymus weights at 9 weeks   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • increased granulocyte number
    • marked increase in absolute neutrophilic granulocyte count is seen in females   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • increased spleen weight
    • a significant increase (~165 mg) in spleen weight is observed compared to wild-type (95 mg)   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • reproductive system phenotype
  • increased epididymis weight
    • males have slightly increased epididymis weight at 9 weeks   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • increased seminal vesicle weight
    • males show a moderate increase in seminal vesicle weight   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • renal/urinary system phenotype
  • increased kidney weight
    • mice show a slight increase in kidney weight   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • decreased thymus weight
    • male and female mice have slightly decreased thymus weights at 9 weeks   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)
  • increased seminal vesicle weight
    • males show a moderate increase in seminal vesicle weight   (MGI Ref ID J:113489)

Cxcr2tm1Mwm/Cxcr2tm1Mwm

        involves: 129S2/SvPas
  • mortality/aging
  • decreased susceptibility to bacterial infection induced morbidity/mortality
    • resistant to fetal tuberculosis in M. tuberculosis-infected mice   (MGI Ref ID J:208901)
  • immune system phenotype
  • decreased susceptibility to bacterial infection induced morbidity/mortality
    • resistant to fetal tuberculosis in M. tuberculosis-infected mice   (MGI Ref ID J:208901)
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Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Internal/Organ Research
Wound Healing
      delayed/impaired

Cxcr2tm1Mwm related

Cancer Research
Growth Factors/Receptors/Cytokines

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
Growth Factors/Receptors/Cytokines

Internal/Organ Research
Spleen Defects

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Cxcr2tm1Mwm
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Mark Moore
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Common Name(s) CXCR2 -; CXCR2-; CXCR-; Cmkar2tm1Mwm; Cmkartm1Mwm; Il8rbtm1Mwm; mCXCR2-; mCXCR-; mIL-8Rh KO; mIL-8Rh-;
Mutation Made ByDr. Mark Moore,   Deltagen
Strain of Origin129S2/SvPas
ES Cell Line NameD3
ES Cell Line Strain129S2/SvPas
Gene Symbol and Name Cxcr2, chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2
Chromosome 1
Gene Common Name(s) interleukin 8 receptor, beta; CD128; CD182; CDw128b; CMKAR2; Cmkar2; G-protein coupled receptor 16; Gpcr16; IL-8Rh; IL-8rb; IL8R2; IL8RA; IL8RB; Il8rb; chemokine (C-X-C) receptor 2; interleukin 8 receptor, beta;
Molecular Note A neomycin selection cassette replaced the entire coding sequence of the gene. [MGI Ref ID J:19570]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Cxcr2tm1Mwmalternate1,

MELT



Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Cacalano G; Lee J; Kikly K; Ryan AM; Pitts-Meek S; Hultgren B; Wood WI; Moore MW. 1994. Neutrophil and B cell expansion in mice that lack the murine IL-8 receptor homolog. Science 265(5172):682-4. [PubMed: 8036519]  [MGI Ref ID J:19570]

Additional References

Banerjee K; Biswas PS; Kim B; Lee S; Rouse BT. 2004. CXCR2-/- mice show enhanced susceptibility to herpetic stromal keratitis: a role for IL-6-induced neovascularization. J Immunol 172(2):1237-45. [PubMed: 14707102]  [MGI Ref ID J:87365]

Del Rio L; Bennouna S; Salinas J; Denkers EY. 2001. CXCR2 Deficiency Confers Impaired Neutrophil Recruitment and Increased Susceptibility During Toxoplasma gondii Infection. J Immunol 167(11):6503-9. [PubMed: 11714818]  [MGI Ref ID J:72824]

Lee J; Cacalano G; Camerato T; Toy K; Moore MW; Wood WI. 1995. Chemokine binding and activities mediated by the mouse IL-8 receptor. J Immunol 155(4):2158-64. [PubMed: 7636264]  [MGI Ref ID J:28069]

Tsai HH; Frost E; To V; Robinson S; Ffrench-Constant C; Geertman R; Ransohoff RM; Miller RH. 2002. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 controls positioning of oligodendrocyte precursors in developing spinal cord by arresting their migration. Cell 110(3):373-83. [PubMed: 12176324]  [MGI Ref ID J:78470]

Cxcr2tm1Mwm related

Abonia JP; Austen KF; Rollins BJ; Joshi SK; Flavell RA; Kuziel WA; Koni PA; Gurish MF. 2005. Constitutive homing of mast cell progenitors to the intestine depends on autologous expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR2. Blood 105(11):4308-13. [PubMed: 15705791]  [MGI Ref ID J:98967]

Abromson-Leeman S; Bronson R; Luo Y; Berman M; Leeman R; Leeman J; Dorf M. 2004. T-cell properties determine disease site, clinical presentation, and cellular pathology of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Am J Pathol 165(5):1519-33. [PubMed: 15509523]  [MGI Ref ID J:109724]

Ahuja N; Andres-Hernando A; Altmann C; Bhargava R; Bacalja J; Webb RG; He Z; Edelstein CL; Faubel S. 2012. Circulating IL-6 mediates lung injury via CXCL1 production after acute kidney injury in mice. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 303(6):F864-72. [PubMed: 22791336]  [MGI Ref ID J:188532]

Balish E; Wagner RD; Vazquez-Torres A; Jones-Carson J; Pierson C; Warner T. 1999. Mucosal and systemic candidiasis in IL-8Rh-/- BALB/c mice. J Leukoc Biol 66(1):144-50. [PubMed: 10411002]  [MGI Ref ID J:56315]

Baluk P; Hogmalm A; Bry M; Alitalo K; Bry K; McDonald DM. 2013. Transgenic overexpression of interleukin-1beta induces persistent lymphangiogenesis but not angiogenesis in mouse airways. Am J Pathol 182(4):1434-47. [PubMed: 23391392]  [MGI Ref ID J:195210]

Baluk P; Phillips K; Yao LC; Adams A; Nitschke M; McDonald DM. 2014. Neutrophil dependence of vascular remodeling after Mycoplasma infection of mouse airways. Am J Pathol 184(6):1877-89. [PubMed: 24726646]  [MGI Ref ID J:211096]

Banerjee K; Biswas PS; Kim B; Lee S; Rouse BT. 2004. CXCR2-/- mice show enhanced susceptibility to herpetic stromal keratitis: a role for IL-6-induced neovascularization. J Immunol 172(2):1237-45. [PubMed: 14707102]  [MGI Ref ID J:87365]

Bischoff DS; Sakamoto T; Ishida K; Makhijani NS; Gruber HE; Yamaguchi DT. 2011. CXC receptor knockout mice: characterization of skeletal features and membranous bone healing in the adult mouse. Bone 48(2):267-74. [PubMed: 20870046]  [MGI Ref ID J:170200]

Boisvert WA; Rose DM; Johnson KA; Fuentes ME; Lira SA; Curtiss LK; Terkeltaub RA. 2006. Up-regulated expression of the CXCR2 Ligand KC/GRO-alpha in atherosclerotic lesions plays a central role in macrophage accumulation and lesion progression. Am J Pathol 168(4):1385-95. [PubMed: 16565511]  [MGI Ref ID J:107325]

Boisvert WA; Santiago R; Curtiss LK; Terkeltaub RA. 1998. A leukocyte homologue of the IL-8 receptor CXCR-2 mediates the accumulation of macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions of LDL receptor-deficient mice. J Clin Invest 101(2):353-63. [PubMed: 9435307]  [MGI Ref ID J:45392]

Bonnett CR; Cornish EJ; Harmsen AG; Burritt JB. 2006. Early neutrophil recruitment and aggregation in the murine lung inhibit germination of Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia. Infect Immun 74(12):6528-39. [PubMed: 16920786]  [MGI Ref ID J:115978]

Brackett CM; Muhitch JB; Evans SS; Gollnick SO. 2013. IL-17 promotes neutrophil entry into tumor-draining lymph nodes following induction of sterile inflammation. J Immunol 191(8):4348-57. [PubMed: 24026079]  [MGI Ref ID J:206281]

Brito BE; O'Rourke LM; Pan Y; Huang X; Park JM; Zamora D; Cook DN; Planck SR; Rosenbaum JT. 1999. Murine endotoxin-induced uveitis, but not immune complex-induced uveitis, is dependent on the IL-8 receptor homolog. Curr Eye Res 19(1):76-85. [PubMed: 10415460]  [MGI Ref ID J:56314]

Brown CR; Blaho VA; Loiacono CM. 2003. Susceptibility to experimental Lyme arthritis correlates with KC and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in joints and requires neutrophil recruitment via CXCR2. J Immunol 171(2):893-901. [PubMed: 12847259]  [MGI Ref ID J:123012]

Broxmeyer HE; Cooper S; Cacalano G; Hague NL; Bailish E; Moore MW. 1996. Involvement of Interleukin (IL) 8 receptor in negative regulation of myeloid progenitor cells in vivo: evidence from mice lacking the murine IL-8 receptor homologue. J Exp Med 184(5):1825-32. [PubMed: 8920870]  [MGI Ref ID J:36582]

Buanne P; Di Carlo E; Caputi L; Brandolini L; Mosca M; Cattani F; Pellegrini L; Biordi L; Coletti G; Sorrentino C; Fedele G; Colotta F; Melillo G; Bertini R. 2007. Crucial pathophysiological role of CXCR2 in experimental ulcerative colitis in mice. J Leukoc Biol 82(5):1239-46. [PubMed: 17656654]  [MGI Ref ID J:127182]

Cardona AE; Sasse ME; Liu L; Cardona SM; Mizutani M; Savarin C; Hu T; Ransohoff RM. 2008. Scavenging roles of chemokine receptors: chemokine receptor deficiency is associated with increased levels of ligand in circulation and tissues. Blood 112(2):256-63. [PubMed: 18347198]  [MGI Ref ID J:138467]

Carlson EC; Sun Y; Auletta J; Kao WW; Liu CY; Perez VL; Pearlman E. 2010. Regulation of corneal inflammation by neutrophil-dependent cleavage of keratan sulfate proteoglycans as a model for breakdown of the chemokine gradient. J Leukoc Biol 88(3):517-22. [PubMed: 20495072]  [MGI Ref ID J:164927]

Carlson T; Kroenke M; Rao P; Lane TE; Segal B. 2008. The Th17-ELR+ CXC chemokine pathway is essential for the development of central nervous system autoimmune disease. J Exp Med 205(4):811-23. [PubMed: 18347102]  [MGI Ref ID J:133981]

Cataisson C; Ohman R; Patel G; Pearson A; Tsien M; Jay S; Wright L; Hennings H; Yuspa SH. 2009. Inducible cutaneous inflammation reveals a protumorigenic role for keratinocyte CXCR2 in skin carcinogenesis. Cancer Res 69(1):319-28. [PubMed: 19118017]  [MGI Ref ID J:143026]

Chavey C; Lazennec G; Lagarrigue S; Clape C; Iankova I; Teyssier J; Annicotte JS; Schmidt J; Mataki C; Yamamoto H; Sanches R; Guma A; Stich V; Vitkova M; Jardin-Watelet B; Renard E; Strieter R; Tuthill A; Hotamisligil GS; Vidal-Puig A; Zorzano A; Langin D; Fajas L. 2009. CXC ligand 5 is an adipose-tissue derived factor that links obesity to insulin resistance. Cell Metab 9(4):339-49. [PubMed: 19356715]  [MGI Ref ID J:148169]

Chou RC; Kim ND; Sadik CD; Seung E; Lan Y; Byrne MH; Haribabu B; Iwakura Y; Luster AD. 2010. Lipid-cytokine-chemokine cascade drives neutrophil recruitment in a murine model of inflammatory arthritis. Immunity 33(2):266-78. [PubMed: 20727790]  [MGI Ref ID J:163913]

Connolly MK; Mallen-St Clair J; Bedrosian AS; Malhotra A; Vera V; Ibrahim J; Henning J; Pachter HL; Bar-Sagi D; Frey AB; Miller G. 2010. Distinct populations of metastases-enabling myeloid cells expand in the liver of mice harboring invasive and preinvasive intra-abdominal tumor. J Leukoc Biol 87(4):713-25. [PubMed: 20042467]  [MGI Ref ID J:158851]

De Sanctis GT; MacLean JA; Qin S; Wolyniec WW; Grasemann H; Yandava CN; Jiao A; Noonan T; Stein-Streilein J; Green FH; Drazen JM. 1999. Interleukin-8 receptor modulates IgE production and B-cell expansion and trafficking in allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation. J Clin Invest 103(4):507-15. [PubMed: 10021459]  [MGI Ref ID J:118974]

DeBerge MP; Ely KH; Cheng GS; Enelow RI. 2013. ADAM17-mediated processing of TNF-alpha expressed by antiviral effector CD8+ T cells is required for severe T-cell-mediated lung injury. PLoS One 8(11):e79340. [PubMed: 24223177]  [MGI Ref ID J:209328]

Del Rio L; Bennouna S; Salinas J; Denkers EY. 2001. CXCR2 Deficiency Confers Impaired Neutrophil Recruitment and Increased Susceptibility During Toxoplasma gondii Infection. J Immunol 167(11):6503-9. [PubMed: 11714818]  [MGI Ref ID J:72824]

Devalaraja RM; Nanney LB; Qian Q; Du J; Yu Y; Devalaraja MN; Richmond A. 2000. Delayed wound healing in CXCR2 knockout mice. J Invest Dermatol 115(2):234-44. [PubMed: 10951241]  [MGI Ref ID J:63935]

Dorhoi A; Iannaccone M; Farinacci M; Fae KC; Schreiber J; Moura-Alves P; Nouailles G; Mollenkopf HJ; Oberbeck-Muller D; Jorg S; Heinemann E; Hahnke K; Lowe D; Del Nonno F; Goletti D; Capparelli R; Kaufmann SH. 2013. MicroRNA-223 controls susceptibility to tuberculosis by regulating lung neutrophil recruitment. J Clin Invest :. [PubMed: 24084739]  [MGI Ref ID J:203989]

Eash KJ; Greenbaum AM; Gopalan PK; Link DC. 2010. CXCR2 and CXCR4 antagonistically regulate neutrophil trafficking from murine bone marrow. J Clin Invest 120(7):2423-31. [PubMed: 20516641]  [MGI Ref ID J:163726]

Eigenbrod T; Park JH; Harder J; Iwakura Y; Nunez G. 2008. Cutting edge: critical role for mesothelial cells in necrosis-induced inflammation through the recognition of IL-1alpha released from dying cells. J Immunol 181(12):8194-8. [PubMed: 19050234]  [MGI Ref ID J:142082]

Eisele NA; Lee-Lewis H; Besch-Williford C; Brown CR; Anderson DM. 2011. Chemokine receptor CXCR2 mediates bacterial clearance rather than neutrophil recruitment in a murine model of pneumonic plague. Am J Pathol 178(3):1190-200. [PubMed: 21356370]  [MGI Ref ID J:169689]

El-Sawy T; Belperio JA; Strieter RM; Remick DG; Fairchild RL. 2005. Inhibition of polymorphonuclear leukocyte-mediated graft damage synergizes with short-term costimulatory blockade to prevent cardiac allograft rejection. Circulation 112(3):320-31. [PubMed: 15998678]  [MGI Ref ID J:117219]

Faunce DE; Sonoda KH; Stein-Streilein J. 2001. MIP-2 recruits NKT cells to the spleen during tolerance induction J Immunol 166(1):313-21. [PubMed: 11123307]  [MGI Ref ID J:66399]

Frendeus B; Godaly G; Hang L; Karpman D; Lundstedt AC; Svanborg C. 2000. Interleukin 8 receptor deficiency confers susceptibility to acute experimental pyelonephritis and may have a human counterpart. J Exp Med 192(6):881-90. [PubMed: 10993918]  [MGI Ref ID J:115347]

Frendeus B; Godaly G; Hang L; Karpman D; Svanborg C. 2001. Interleukin-8 receptor deficiency confers susceptibility to acute pyelonephritis. J Infect Dis 183 Suppl 1:S56-60. [PubMed: 11171016]  [MGI Ref ID J:120023]

Frommhold D; Ludwig A; Bixel MG; Zarbock A; Babushkina I; Weissinger M; Cauwenberghs S; Ellies LG; Marth JD; Beck-Sickinger AG; Sixt M; Lange-Sperandio B; Zernecke A; Brandt E; Weber C; Vestweber D; Ley K; Sperandio M. 2008. Sialyltransferase ST3Gal-IV controls CXCR2-mediated firm leukocyte arrest during inflammation. J Exp Med 205(6):1435-46. [PubMed: 18519646]  [MGI Ref ID J:137041]

Galioto AM; Hess JA; Nolan TJ; Schad GA; Lee JJ; Abraham D. 2006. Role of eosinophils and neutrophils in innate and adaptive protective immunity to larval strongyloides stercoralis in mice. Infect Immun 74(10):5730-8. [PubMed: 16988250]  [MGI Ref ID J:112863]

Gelderblom M; Weymar A; Bernreuther C; Velden J; Arunachalam P; Steinbach K; Orthey E; Arumugam TV; Leypoldt F; Simova O; Thom V; Friese MA; Prinz I; Holscher C; Glatzel M; Korn T; Gerloff C; Tolosa E; Magnus T. 2012. Neutralization of the IL-17 axis diminishes neutrophil invasion and protects from ischemic stroke. Blood 120(18):3793-802. [PubMed: 22976954]  [MGI Ref ID J:191283]

Godaly G; Hang L; Frendeus B; Svanborg C. 2000. Transepithelial neutrophil migration is CXCR1 dependent In vitro and Is defective in IL-8 receptor knockout mice J Immunol 165(9):5287-94. [PubMed: 11046063]  [MGI Ref ID J:65425]

Goncalves AS; Appelberg R. 2002. The involvement of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 in neutrophil recruitment in LPS-induced inflammation and in Mycobacterium avium infection. Scand J Immunol 55(6):585-91. [PubMed: 12028561]  [MGI Ref ID J:103682]

Griffin GK; Newton G; Tarrio ML; Bu DX; Maganto-Garcia E; Azcutia V; Alcaide P; Grabie N; Luscinskas FW; Croce KJ; Lichtman AH. 2012. IL-17 and TNF-alpha sustain neutrophil recruitment during inflammation through synergistic effects on endothelial activation. J Immunol 188(12):6287-99. [PubMed: 22566565]  [MGI Ref ID J:188885]

Hall LR; Diaconu E; Patel R; Pearlman E. 2001. CXC chemokine receptor 2 but not C-C chemokine receptor 1 expression is essential for neutrophil recruitment to the cornea in helminth-mediated keratitis (river blindness). J Immunol 166(6):4035-41. [PubMed: 11238651]  [MGI Ref ID J:126653]

Hallgren J; Jones TG; Abonia JP; Xing W; Humbles A; Austen KF; Gurish MF. 2007. Pulmonary CXCR2 regulates VCAM-1 and antigen-induced recruitment of mast cell progenitors. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104(51):20478-83. [PubMed: 18077323]  [MGI Ref ID J:130586]

Hang L; Frendeus B; Godaly G; Svanborg C. 2000. Interleukin-8 receptor knockout mice have subepithelial neutrophil entrapment and renal scarring following acute pyelonephritis J Infect Dis 182(6):1738-48. [PubMed: 11069247]  [MGI Ref ID J:65905]

Herbold W; Maus R; Hahn I; Ding N; Srivastava M; Christman JW; Mack M; Reutershan J; Briles DE; Paton JC; Winter C; Welte T; Maus UA. 2010. Importance of CXC chemokine receptor 2 in alveolar neutrophil and exudate macrophage recruitment in response to pneumococcal lung infection. Infect Immun 78(6):2620-30. [PubMed: 20368349]  [MGI Ref ID J:160181]

Hogmalm A; Backstrom E; Bry M; Lappalainen U; Lukkarinen HP; Bry K. 2012. Role of CXC chemokine receptor-2 in a murine model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 47(6):746-58. [PubMed: 22865624]  [MGI Ref ID J:204048]

Huppler AR; Conti HR; Hernandez-Santos N; Darville T; Biswas PS; Gaffen SL. 2014. Role of neutrophils in IL-17-dependent immunity to mucosal candidiasis. J Immunol 192(4):1745-52. [PubMed: 24442441]  [MGI Ref ID J:209360]

Jamieson T; Clarke M; Steele CW; Samuel MS; Neumann J; Jung A; Huels D; Olson MF; Das S; Nibbs RJ; Sansom OJ. 2012. Inhibition of CXCR2 profoundly suppresses inflammation-driven and spontaneous tumorigenesis. J Clin Invest 122(9):3127-44. [PubMed: 22922255]  [MGI Ref ID J:190744]

Johnston RA; Mizgerd JP; Shore SA. 2005. CXCR2 is essential for maximal neutrophil recruitment and methacholine responsiveness after ozone exposure. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 288(1):L61-7. [PubMed: 15361358]  [MGI Ref ID J:104756]

Katoh H; Wang D; Daikoku T; Sun H; Dey SK; Dubois RN. 2013. CXCR2-expressing myeloid-derived suppressor cells are essential to promote colitis-associated tumorigenesis. Cancer Cell 24(5):631-44. [PubMed: 24229710]  [MGI Ref ID J:206735]

Keane MP; Belperio JA; Xue YY; Burdick MD; Strieter RM. 2004. Depletion of CXCR2 inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in a murine model of lung cancer. J Immunol 172(5):2853-60. [PubMed: 14978086]  [MGI Ref ID J:88233]

Kesteman N; Vansanten G; Pajak B; Goyert SM; Moser M. 2008. Injection of lipopolysaccharide induces the migration of splenic neutrophils to the T cell area of the white pulp: role of CD14 and CXC chemokines. J Leukoc Biol 83(3):640-7. [PubMed: 18156186]  [MGI Ref ID J:132653]

Khan S; Cole N; Hume EB; Garthwaite L; Conibear TC; Miles DH; Aliwaga Y; Krockenberger MB; Willcox MD. 2007. The role of CXC chemokine receptor 2 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa corneal infection. J Leukoc Biol 81(1):315-8. [PubMed: 17028201]  [MGI Ref ID J:117239]

Kim HJ; Alonzo ES; Dorothee G; Pollard JW; Sant'Angelo DB. 2010. Selective depletion of eosinophils or neutrophils in mice impacts the efficiency of apoptotic cell clearance in the thymus. PLoS One 5(7):e11439. [PubMed: 20625428]  [MGI Ref ID J:163125]

Kohler A; De Filippo K; Hasenberg M; van den Brandt C; Nye E; Hosking MP; Lane TE; Mann L; Ransohoff RM; Hauser AE; Winter O; Schraven B; Geiger H; Hogg N; Gunzer M. 2011. G-CSF-mediated thrombopoietin release triggers neutrophil motility and mobilization from bone marrow via induction of Cxcr2 ligands. Blood 117(16):4349-57. [PubMed: 21224471]  [MGI Ref ID J:172615]

Kousis PC; Henderson BW; Maier PG; Gollnick SO. 2007. Photodynamic therapy enhancement of antitumor immunity is regulated by neutrophils. Cancer Res 67(21):10501-10. [PubMed: 17974994]  [MGI Ref ID J:127142]

Lammermann T; Afonso PV; Angermann BR; Wang JM; Kastenmuller W; Parent CA; Germain RN. 2013. Neutrophil swarms require LTB4 and integrins at sites of cell death in vivo. Nature 498(7454):371-5. [PubMed: 23708969]  [MGI Ref ID J:198733]

Lee PY; Kumagai Y; Xu Y; Li Y; Barker T; Liu C; Sobel ES; Takeuchi O; Akira S; Satoh M; Reeves WH. 2011. IL-1alpha modulates neutrophil recruitment in chronic inflammation induced by hydrocarbon oil. J Immunol 186(3):1747-54. [PubMed: 21191074]  [MGI Ref ID J:168904]

Lee YS; Choi D; Kim NY; Yang S; Jung E; Hong M; Yang D; Lenz HJ; Hong YK. 2014. CXCR2 inhibition enhances sulindac-mediated suppression of colon cancer development. Int J Cancer 135(1):232-7. [PubMed: 24338666]  [MGI Ref ID J:211966]

Lin M; Jackson P; Tester AM; Diaconu E; Overall CM; Blalock JE; Pearlman E. 2008. Matrix metalloproteinase-8 facilitates neutrophil migration through the corneal stromal matrix by collagen degradation and production of the chemotactic peptide Pro-Gly-Pro. Am J Pathol 173(1):144-53. [PubMed: 18556780]  [MGI Ref ID J:137367]

Lindner M; Trebst C; Heine S; Skripuletz T; Koutsoudaki PN; Stangel M. 2008. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 is differentially regulated on glial cells in vivo but is not required for successful remyelination after cuprizone-induced demyelination. Glia 56(10):1104-13. [PubMed: 18442092]  [MGI Ref ID J:156266]

Liu L; Belkadi A; Darnall L; Hu T; Drescher C; Cotleur AC; Padovani-Claudio D; He T; Choi K; Lane TE; Miller RH; Ransohoff RM. 2010. CXCR2-positive neutrophils are essential for cuprizone-induced demyelination: relevance to multiple sclerosis. Nat Neurosci 13(3):319-26. [PubMed: 20154684]  [MGI Ref ID J:158592]

Liu L; Darnall L; Hu T; Choi K; Lane TE; Ransohoff RM. 2010. Myelin repair is accelerated by inactivating CXCR2 on nonhematopoietic cells. J Neurosci 30(27):9074-83. [PubMed: 20610741]  [MGI Ref ID J:166287]

McDonald B; Pittman K; Menezes GB; Hirota SA; Slaba I; Waterhouse CC; Beck PL; Muruve DA; Kubes P. 2010. Intravascular danger signals guide neutrophils to sites of sterile inflammation. Science 330(6002):362-6. [PubMed: 20947763]  [MGI Ref ID J:164871]

Mestas J; Burdick MD; Reckamp K; Pantuck A; Figlin RA; Strieter RM. 2005. The role of CXCR2/CXCR2 ligand biological axis in renal cell carcinoma. J Immunol 175(8):5351-7. [PubMed: 16210641]  [MGI Ref ID J:119108]

Mihara K; Smit MJ; Krajnc-Franken M; Gossen J; Rooseboom M; Dokter W. 2005. Human CXCR2 (hCXCR2) takes over functionalities of its murine homolog in hCXCR2 knockin mice. Eur J Immunol 35(9):2573-82. [PubMed: 16094689]  [MGI Ref ID J:113489]

Milatovic S; Nanney LB; Yu Y; White JR; Richmond A. 2003. Impaired healing of nitrogen mustard wounds in CXCR2 null mice. Wound Repair Regen 11(3):213-9. [PubMed: 12753603]  [MGI Ref ID J:103539]

Miller AL; Strieter RM; Gruber AD; Ho SB; Lukacs NW. 2003. CXCR2 regulates respiratory syncytial virus-induced airway hyperreactivity and mucus overproduction. J Immunol 170(6):3348-56. [PubMed: 12626595]  [MGI Ref ID J:82293]

Miyairi I; Tatireddigari VR; Mahdi OS; Rose LA; Belland RJ; Lu L; Williams RW; Byrne GI. 2007. The p47 GTPases Iigp2 and Irgb10 regulate innate immunity and inflammation to murine Chlamydia psittaci infection. J Immunol 179(3):1814-24. [PubMed: 17641048]  [MGI Ref ID J:150323]

Moayeri M; Crown D; Newman ZL; Okugawa S; Eckhaus M; Cataisson C; Liu S; Sastalla I; Leppla SH. 2010. Inflammasome sensor Nlrp1b-dependent resistance to anthrax is mediated by caspase-1, IL-1 signaling and neutrophil recruitment. PLoS Pathog 6(12):e1001222. [PubMed: 21170303]  [MGI Ref ID J:168096]

Nagarkar DR; Wang Q; Shim J; Zhao Y; Tsai WC; Lukacs NW; Sajjan U; Hershenson MB. 2009. CXCR2 is required for neutrophilic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in a mouse model of human rhinovirus infection. J Immunol 183(10):6698-707. [PubMed: 19864593]  [MGI Ref ID J:157178]

Neels JG; Badeanlou L; Hester KD; Samad F. 2009. Keratinocyte-derived chemokine in obesity: expression, regulation, and role in adipose macrophage infiltration and glucose homeostasis. J Biol Chem 284(31):20692-8. [PubMed: 19494115]  [MGI Ref ID J:153182]

Nemzek JA; Abatan O; Fry C; Mattar A. 2010. Functional contribution of CXCR2 to lung injury after aspiration of acid and gastric particulates. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 298(3):L382-91. [PubMed: 20044435]  [MGI Ref ID J:157649]

Ness TL; Hogaboam CM; Strieter RM; Kunkel SL. 2003. Immunomodulatory role of CXCR2 during experimental septic peritonitis. J Immunol 171(7):3775-84. [PubMed: 14500678]  [MGI Ref ID J:85647]

Nouailles G; Dorhoi A; Koch M; Zerrahn J; Weiner J 3rd; Fae KC; Arrey F; Kuhlmann S; Bandermann S; Loewe D; Mollenkopf HJ; Vogelzang A; Meyer-Schwesinger C; Mittrucker HW; McEwen G; Kaufmann SH. 2014. CXCL5-secreting pulmonary epithelial cells drive destructive neutrophilic inflammation in tuberculosis. J Clin Invest 124(3):1268-82. [PubMed: 24509076]  [MGI Ref ID J:208901]

O'Hayer KM; Brady DC; Counter CM. 2009. ELR+ CXC chemokines and oncogenic Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. Carcinogenesis 30(11):1841-7. [PubMed: 19805574]  [MGI Ref ID J:154789]

Oh S; Woo JI; Lim DJ; Moon SK. 2012. ERK2-dependent activation of c-Jun is required for nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-induced CXCL2 upregulation in inner ear fibrocytes. J Immunol 188(7):3496-505. [PubMed: 22379036]  [MGI Ref ID J:183094]

Padovani-Claudio DA; Liu L; Ransohoff RM; Miller RH. 2006. Alterations in the oligodendrocyte lineage, myelin, and white matter in adult mice lacking the chemokine receptor CXCR2. Glia 54(5):471-83. [PubMed: 16886211]  [MGI Ref ID J:156119]

Raccosta L; Fontana R; Maggioni D; Lanterna C; Villablanca EJ; Paniccia A; Musumeci A; Chiricozzi E; Trincavelli ML; Daniele S; Martini C; Gustafsson JA; Doglioni C; Feo SG; Leiva A; Ciampa MG; Mauri L; Sensi C; Prinetti A; Eberini I; Mora JR; Bordignon C; Steffensen KR; Sonnino S; Sozzani S; Traversari C; Russo V. 2013. The oxysterol-CXCR2 axis plays a key role in the recruitment of tumor-promoting neutrophils. J Exp Med 210(9):1711-28. [PubMed: 23897983]  [MGI Ref ID J:202504]

Raman D; Milatovic SZ; Milatovic D; Splittgerber R; Fan GH; Richmond A. 2011. Chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha, suppress amyloid beta-induced neurotoxicity. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 256(3):300-13. [PubMed: 21704645]  [MGI Ref ID J:178566]

Ranganathan P; Jayakumar C; Manicassamy S; Ramesh G. 2013. CXCR2 knockout mice are protected against DSS-colitis-induced acute kidney injury and inflammation. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 305(10):F1422-7. [PubMed: 23986515]  [MGI Ref ID J:202999]

Reddy AS; Patel JR; Vogler C; Klein RS; Sands MS. 2013. Central nervous system pathology progresses independently of KC and CXCR2 in globoid-cell leukodystrophy. PLoS One 8(6):e64647. [PubMed: 23755134]  [MGI Ref ID J:204256]

Reutershan J; Morris MA; Burcin TL; Smith DF; Chang D; Saprito MS; Ley K. 2006. Critical role of endothelial CXCR2 in LPS-induced neutrophil migration into the lung. J Clin Invest 116(3):695-702. [PubMed: 16485040]  [MGI Ref ID J:106505]

Roche JK; Keepers TR; Gross LK; Seaner RM; Obrig TG. 2007. CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 are critical effectors and potential targets for therapy of Escherichia coli O157:H7-associated renal inflammation. Am J Pathol 170(2):526-37. [PubMed: 17255321]  [MGI Ref ID J:117888]

Schuh JM; Blease K; Hogaboam CM. 2002. CXCR2 is necessary for the development and persistence of chronic fungal asthma in mice. J Immunol 168(3):1447-56. [PubMed: 11801688]  [MGI Ref ID J:73947]

Shaftel SS; Carlson TJ; Olschowka JA; Kyrkanides S; Matousek SB; O'Banion MK. 2007. Chronic interleukin-1beta expression in mouse brain leads to leukocyte infiltration and neutrophil-independent blood brain barrier permeability without overt neurodegeneration. J Neurosci 27(35):9301-9. [PubMed: 17728444]  [MGI Ref ID J:124945]

Shen H; Schuster R; Lu B; Waltz SE; Lentsch AB. 2006. Critical and opposing roles of the chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR3 in prostate tumor growth. Prostate 66(16):1721-8. [PubMed: 16941672]  [MGI Ref ID J:115957]

Shin K; Nigrovic PA; Crish J; Boilard E; McNeil HP; Larabee KS; Adachi R; Gurish MF; Gobezie R; Stevens RL; Lee DM. 2009. Mast cells contribute to autoimmune inflammatory arthritis via their tryptase/heparin complexes. J Immunol 182(1):647-56. [PubMed: 19109198]  [MGI Ref ID J:142880]

Singh S; Varney M; Singh RK. 2009. Host CXCR2-dependent regulation of melanoma growth, angiogenesis, and experimental lung metastasis. Cancer Res 69(2):411-5. [PubMed: 19147552]  [MGI Ref ID J:143714]

Singh UP; Singh S; Boyaka PN; McGhee JR; Lillard JW Jr. 2004. Granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 mediates adaptive immunity in part through IL-8R{beta} interactions. J Leukoc Biol 76(6):1240-1247. [PubMed: 15356099]  [MGI Ref ID J:94170]

Smith ML; Olson TS; Ley K. 2004. CXCR2- and E-selectin-induced neutrophil arrest during inflammation in vivo. J Exp Med 200(7):935-9. [PubMed: 15466624]  [MGI Ref ID J:93946]

Spehlmann ME; Dann SM; Hruz P; Hanson E; McCole DF; Eckmann L. 2009. CXCR2-dependent mucosal neutrophil influx protects against colitis-associated diarrhea caused by an attaching/effacing lesion-forming bacterial pathogen. J Immunol 183(5):3332-43. [PubMed: 19675161]  [MGI Ref ID J:151846]

Sporri R; Joller N; Albers U; Hilbi H; Oxenius A. 2006. MyD88-dependent IFN-gamma production by NK cells is key for control of Legionella pneumophila infection. J Immunol 176(10):6162-71. [PubMed: 16670325]  [MGI Ref ID J:131762]

Sugimoto N; Rui T; Yang M; Bharwani S; Handa O; Yoshida N; Yoshikawa T; Kvietys PR. 2008. Points of control exerted along the macrophage-endothelial cell-polymorphonuclear neutrophil axis by PECAM-1 in the innate immune response of acute colonic inflammation. J Immunol 181(3):2145-54. [PubMed: 18641353]  [MGI Ref ID J:139228]

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Svensson M; Irjala H; Svanborg C; Godaly G. 2008. Effects of epithelial and neutrophil CXCR2 on innate immunity and resistance to kidney infection. Kidney Int 74(1):81-90. [PubMed: 18401338]  [MGI Ref ID J:152873]

Svensson M; Yadav M; Holmqvist B; Lutay N; Svanborg C; Godaly G. 2011. Acute pyelonephritis and renal scarring are caused by dysfunctional innate immunity in mCxcr2 heterozygous mice. Kidney Int 80(10):1064-72. [PubMed: 21814172]  [MGI Ref ID J:194803]

Swain SD; Meissner NN; Siemsen DW; McInnerney K; Harmsen AG. 2012. Pneumocystis elicits a STAT6-dependent, strain-specific innate immune response and airway hyperresponsiveness. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 46(3):290-8. [PubMed: 21960549]  [MGI Ref ID J:194583]

Swain SD; Wright TW; Degel PM; Gigliotti F; Harmsen AG. 2004. Neither neutrophils nor reactive oxygen species contribute to tissue damage during Pneumocystis pneumonia in mice. Infect Immun 72(10):5722-32. [PubMed: 15385471]  [MGI Ref ID J:93116]

Toh B; Wang X; Keeble J; Sim WJ; Khoo K; Wong WC; Kato M; Prevost-Blondel A; Thiery JP; Abastado JP. 2011. Mesenchymal transition and dissemination of cancer cells is driven by myeloid-derived suppressor cells infiltrating the primary tumor. PLoS Biol 9(9):e1001162. [PubMed: 21980263]  [MGI Ref ID J:184038]

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Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Room Number           AX11

Colony Maintenance

Mating SystemHomozygote x Heterozygote         (Female x Male)   26-FEB-08
Diet Information LabDiet® 5K52/5K67

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $239.00Female or MaleHeterozygous for Cxcr2tm1Mwm  
$239.00Female or MaleHomozygous for Cxcr2tm1Mwm  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$478.00Homozygous for Cxcr2tm1Mwm x Heterozygous for Cxcr2tm1Mwm  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $310.70Female or MaleHeterozygous for Cxcr2tm1Mwm  
$310.70Female or MaleHomozygous for Cxcr2tm1Mwm  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$621.40Homozygous for Cxcr2tm1Mwm x Heterozygous for Cxcr2tm1Mwm  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

Control Information

  Control
   000651 BALB/cJ
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

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Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
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JAX® Mice
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JAX® Services
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Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
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Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


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General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

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phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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