Strain Name:

B6.129P2-Il2rbtm1Mak/J

Stock Number:

002816

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Availability:

Cryopreserved - Ready for recovery

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Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
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Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Specieslaboratory mouse
Background Strain C57BL/6
Donor Strain 129
 
Donating InvestigatorDr. Tak Mak,   University Health Network/Un of Toronto

Description
Mice homozygous for the Il2rbtm1Mak targeted mutation have dysfunctional T and B cell compartments. Effects of the mutation include myeloproliferative disorder, splenomegaly and lymphoadenopathy by 3 weeks of age. Mice have high serum immunoglobulins G1 and E and autoantibodies leading to hemolytic anemia. Lifespan is approximately 12 weeks.

Control Information

  Control
   Wild-type from the colony
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Il2rbtm1Mak/Il2rbtm1Mak

        B6.129-Il2rbtm1Mak
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal lymphocyte morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • abnormal T cell activation
      • percentage of CD4 and CD8 T cells that express high levels of activation markers is increased   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • T cells are hyporesponsive to inflammatory cytokines as measured by in vitro proliferation assays   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • expression of activation markers is normalized upon transfer of 1 x 105 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • decreased T cell proliferation
        • in mice by 26 days of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
        • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 1 x 105 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • decreased regulatory T cell number
      • there is a 2 to 5 fold reduction in the percentage of CD25-postive CD4 T cells in both the thymus and lymph nodes   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • transgeneic expression of Il2rb in the thymus rescues number of regulatory T cells   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • abnormal response to transplant
    • adoptively transfered regulatory T cell expand at least 15 to 20 times until they make up 3-5% of the total cells in the lymph nodes and spleen   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • regulatory T cells were unable to engraft in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • abnormal spleen periarteriolar lymphoid sheath morphology
    • increased in size at 26 days of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 1 x 105 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • enlarged lymph nodes
    • in mice by 26 days of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 1 x 105 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • enlarged spleen
    • in mice by 26 days of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 1 x 105 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • increased anti-double stranded DNA antibody level
    • in mice by 26 days of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 1 x 105 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • increased susceptibility to autoimmune hemolytic anemia
    • by 26 days of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 1 x 105 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal lymphocyte morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • abnormal T cell activation
      • percentage of CD4 and CD8 T cells that express high levels of activation markers is increased   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • T cells are hyporesponsive to inflammatory cytokines as measured by in vitro proliferation assays   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • expression of activation markers is normalized upon transfer of 1 x 105 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • decreased T cell proliferation
        • in mice by 26 days of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
        • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 1 x 105 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • decreased regulatory T cell number
      • there is a 2 to 5 fold reduction in the percentage of CD25-postive CD4 T cells in both the thymus and lymph nodes   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • transgeneic expression of Il2rb in the thymus rescues number of regulatory T cells   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • abnormal spleen periarteriolar lymphoid sheath morphology
    • increased in size at 26 days of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 1 x 105 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • enlarged spleen
    • in mice by 26 days of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 1 x 105 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • increased susceptibility to autoimmune hemolytic anemia
    • by 26 days of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 1 x 105 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Il2rbtm1Mak/Il2rbtm1Mak

        either: (involves: 129P2/OlaHsd) or (involves: 129S2/SvPas)
  • mortality/aging
  • premature death
    • death occurs by 12 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • weight loss
    • mice start losing weight at three weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal mononuclear cell morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • abnormal B cell activation
      • B cells are unable to respond to a T-cell independent antigen   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • abnormal T cell activation
      • T cells fail to activate to a number of mitogens   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • decreased B cell number
      • B cells are almost absent by 8 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • decreased double-positive T cell number
      • about 3.5 fold less DP T cells at six weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • decreased memory T cell number
      • memory T cells are not generated to LCMV virus   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • increased CD4-positive, alpha beta T cell number
      • increase of single-positive CD4 T cells in the thymus   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • increased CD8-positive, alpha-beta T cell number
      • increase of single-positive CD8 T cells in the thymus   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • increased activated T cell number
      • 4 fold increase in number of activated (CD69-positive) T cells from the mesenteric lymph nodes   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • increased plasma cell number
      • are found in lymph nodes starting about 4 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • enlarged lymph nodes
    • is observed by three weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • enlarged spleen
    • is observed by three weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • increased IgE level
    • 10 to 100 fold higher in the sera of 3 week old mice   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • increased IgG1 level
    • 10 to 100 fold higher in the sera of 3 week old mice   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • increased anti-nuclear antigen antibody level
    • high concentrations occur in the sera by 3 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • increased granulocyte number
    • over 90% of cells in the spleen of 8 week old mice are composed of granulocytes and their precursors   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • increased neutrophil cell number
      • are found in lymph nodes starting about 4 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • increased susceptibility to autoimmune hemolytic anemia
    • mild anema occurs at 3 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • thymus hypoplasia
    • about 10 fold less thymocytes compared to wild-type mice at six weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • abnormal sex gland morphology
    • poorly developed genitalia are evident by six weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • thymus hypoplasia
    • about 10 fold less thymocytes compared to wild-type mice at six weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal common myeloid progenitor cell morphology
    • liver and spleen is infiltrated by large number of myeloid precursors   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • around 8 weeks of age, bone marrow is also infiltrated   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • abnormal mononuclear cell morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • abnormal B cell activation
      • B cells are unable to respond to a T-cell independent antigen   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • abnormal T cell activation
      • T cells fail to activate to a number of mitogens   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • decreased B cell number
      • B cells are almost absent by 8 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • decreased double-positive T cell number
      • about 3.5 fold less DP T cells at six weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • decreased memory T cell number
      • memory T cells are not generated to LCMV virus   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • increased CD4-positive, alpha beta T cell number
      • increase of single-positive CD4 T cells in the thymus   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • increased CD8-positive, alpha-beta T cell number
      • increase of single-positive CD8 T cells in the thymus   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • increased activated T cell number
      • 4 fold increase in number of activated (CD69-positive) T cells from the mesenteric lymph nodes   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • increased plasma cell number
      • are found in lymph nodes starting about 4 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • enlarged spleen
    • is observed by three weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • increased IgE level
    • 10 to 100 fold higher in the sera of 3 week old mice   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • increased IgG1 level
    • 10 to 100 fold higher in the sera of 3 week old mice   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • increased erythroid progenitor cell number
    • increase numbers found in the blood between 3 and 8 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • increased granulocyte number
    • over 90% of cells in the spleen of 8 week old mice are composed of granulocytes and their precursors   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
    • increased neutrophil cell number
      • are found in lymph nodes starting about 4 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • increased susceptibility to autoimmune hemolytic anemia
    • mild anema occurs at 3 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • thymus hypoplasia
    • about 10 fold less thymocytes compared to wild-type mice at six weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal locomotor behavior
    • mice are slow when moving   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • reproductive system phenotype
  • abnormal sex gland morphology
    • poorly developed genitalia are evident by six weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)
  • integument phenotype
  • abnormal hair texture
    • hair is fuzzy in appearance   (MGI Ref ID J:25940)

Il2rbtm1Mak/Il2rbtm1Mak

        C.129-Il2rbtm1Mak
  • mortality/aging
  • premature death
    • mice die between 3 to 5 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal immune system organ morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • abnormal marginal zone B cell morphology
      • extension of marginal zones found in the spleen   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • abnormal spleen periarteriolar lymphoid sheath morphology
      • increase in size   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • enlarged lymph nodes
      • by 3 to 5 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • enlarged spleen
      • by 3 to 5 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • abnormal lymphocyte morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • abnormal T cell activation
      • percentage of CD4 and CD8 T cells that express high levels of activation markers is increased   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • T cells are hyporesponsive to inflammatory cytokines as measured by in vitro proliferation assays   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • expression of activation markers is normalized upon transfer of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • decreased T cell proliferation
        • by 3 to 5 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
        • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • abnormal T cell clonal deletion
      • expected deletion occurs of T cells that recognize BALB/c specific superantigens, indicating the autoimmunity associated with this mouse strain is unlikely to be a failure to eliminate self-reactive T cells   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • abnormal marginal zone B cell morphology
      • extension of marginal zones found in the spleen   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • decreased CD8-positive, alpha-beta T cell number
      • number is reduced by a third upon transfer of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • increased anti-double stranded DNA antibody level
    • by 3 to 5 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • increased susceptibility to autoimmune hemolytic anemia
    • cause of death at 3 to 5 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • liver inflammation
    • large atypical lymphocytes are observed in the liver   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • no inflammation is observed in mice that receive transfer of 3 x 104 wild-type CD25-positive CD4 T   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • liver/biliary system phenotype
  • liver inflammation
    • large atypical lymphocytes are observed in the liver   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • no inflammation is observed in mice that receive transfer of 3 x 104 wild-type CD25-positive CD4 T   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal lymphocyte morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • abnormal T cell activation
      • percentage of CD4 and CD8 T cells that express high levels of activation markers is increased   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • T cells are hyporesponsive to inflammatory cytokines as measured by in vitro proliferation assays   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • expression of activation markers is normalized upon transfer of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • decreased T cell proliferation
        • by 3 to 5 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
        • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • abnormal T cell clonal deletion
      • expected deletion occurs of T cells that recognize BALB/c specific superantigens, indicating the autoimmunity associated with this mouse strain is unlikely to be a failure to eliminate self-reactive T cells   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • abnormal marginal zone B cell morphology
      • extension of marginal zones found in the spleen   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
      • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • decreased CD8-positive, alpha-beta T cell number
      • number is reduced by a third upon transfer of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • abnormal spleen periarteriolar lymphoid sheath morphology
    • increase in size   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • enlarged spleen
    • by 3 to 5 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • increased susceptibility to autoimmune hemolytic anemia
    • cause of death at 3 to 5 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
    • can be prevented with adoptive transfer at birth of 3 x 104 CD25-positive CD4 T cells from wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)

Il2rbtm1Mak/Il2rbtm1Mak

        D2.129-Il2rbtm1Mak
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal T cell clonal deletion
    • expected deletion occurs of T cells that recognize DBA/2 specific superantigens, indicating the autoimmunity associated with this mouse strain is unlikely to be a failure to eliminate self-reactive T cells   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal T cell clonal deletion
    • expected deletion occurs of T cells that recognize DBA/2 specific superantigens, indicating the autoimmunity associated with this mouse strain is unlikely to be a failure to eliminate self-reactive T cells   (MGI Ref ID J:113547)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Il2rbtm1Mak related

Cancer Research
Growth Factors/Receptors/Cytokines

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
Growth Factors/Receptors/Cytokines
Immunodeficiency

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Il2rbtm1Mak
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Tak Mak
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Common Name(s) 2Rbeta-; CD122-; IL-2/IL-15Rbeta-; IL-2Rbeta-; Il2rb-;
Mutation Made ByDr. Tak Mak,   University Health Network/Un of Toronto
Strain of Origin129
ES Cell Line NameOther (see notes)
Gene Symbol and Name Il2rb, interleukin 2 receptor, beta chain
Chromosome 15
Gene Common Name(s) CD122; IL-15 receptor beta chain; IL-15Rbeta; IL-2/15Rbeta; IL15RB; IL15Rbeta; IL2RBC; Il-2Rbeta; P70-75;
General Note Mice were generated from two independent embryonic stem cell lines: D3, derived from 129S2/SvPas; and E14, derived from 129P2/OlaHsd. (J:25940) Experiments described in J:25940 were performed using mice derived from the D3 ES cell line.
Molecular Note Insertion of a neomycin resistance cassette disrupted exon 6 of the gene, which encodes a region of extracellular domain proximal to the transmembrane region of the protein. [MGI Ref ID J:25940]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Il2rbtm1Mak, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Suzuki H; Kundig TM; Furlonger C; Wakeham A; Timms E; Matsuyama T; Schmits R; Simard JJ; Ohashi PS; Griesser H; Taniguchi T; Paige CJ; Mak TW. 1995. Deregulated T cell activation and autoimmunity in mice lacking interleukin-2 receptor beta. Science 268(5216):1472-6. [PubMed: 7770771]  [MGI Ref ID J:25940]

Additional References

Il2rbtm1Mak related

Adeegbe D; Bayer AL; Levy RB; Malek TR. 2006. Cutting edge: allogeneic CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells suppress autoimmunity while establishing transplantation tolerance. J Immunol 176(12):7149-53. [PubMed: 16751356]  [MGI Ref ID J:132248]

Bayer AL; Chirinos J; Cabello C; Yang J; Matsutani T; Malek TR; Levy RB. 2011. Expansion of a restricted residual host T reg-cell repertoire is dependent on IL-2 following experimental autologous hematopoietic stem transplantation. Eur J Immunol 41(12):3467-78. [PubMed: 21928285]  [MGI Ref ID J:179509]

Bayer AL; Lee JY; de la Barrera A; Surh CD; Malek TR. 2008. A function for IL-7R for CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells. J Immunol 181(1):225-34. [PubMed: 18566388]  [MGI Ref ID J:137409]

Bayer AL; Yu A; Adeegbe D; Malek TR. 2005. Essential role for interleukin-2 for CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cell development during the neonatal period. J Exp Med 201(5):769-77. [PubMed: 15753210]  [MGI Ref ID J:96622]

Burchill MA; Yang J; Vogtenhuber C; Blazar BR; Farrar MA. 2007. IL-2 receptor beta-dependent STAT5 activation is required for the development of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. J Immunol 178(1):280-90. [PubMed: 17182565]  [MGI Ref ID J:141932]

Castro I; Dee MJ; Malek TR. 2012. Transient enhanced IL-2R signaling early during priming rapidly amplifies development of functional CD8+ T effector-memory cells. J Immunol 189(9):4321-30. [PubMed: 23018461]  [MGI Ref ID J:190611]

Castro I; Yu A; Dee MJ; Malek TR. 2011. The basis of distinctive IL-2- and IL-15-dependent signaling: weak CD122-dependent signaling favors CD8+ T central-memory cell survival but not T effector-memory cell development. J Immunol 187(10):5170-82. [PubMed: 21984699]  [MGI Ref ID J:179645]

Chan CW; Crafton E; Fan HN; Flook J; Yoshimura K; Skarica M; Brockstedt D; Dubensky TW; Stins MF; Lanier LL; Pardoll DM; Housseau F. 2006. Interferon-producing killer dendritic cells provide a link between innate and adaptive immunity. Nat Med 12(2):207-13. [PubMed: 16444266]  [MGI Ref ID J:105799]

Cheng G; Yu A; Dee MJ; Malek TR. 2013. IL-2R Signaling Is Essential for Functional Maturation of Regulatory T Cells during Thymic Development. J Immunol 190(4):1567-75. [PubMed: 23315074]  [MGI Ref ID J:193324]

Cheng G; Yuan X; Tsai MS; Podack ER; Yu A; Malek TR. 2012. IL-2 receptor signaling is essential for the development of Klrg1+ terminally differentiated T regulatory cells. J Immunol 189(4):1780-91. [PubMed: 22786769]  [MGI Ref ID J:189754]

Cho JH; Boyman O; Kim HO; Hahm B; Rubinstein MP; Ramsey C; Kim DM; Surh CD; Sprent J. 2007. An intense form of homeostatic proliferation of naive CD8+ cells driven by IL-2. J Exp Med 204(8):1787-801. [PubMed: 17664294]  [MGI Ref ID J:125917]

DePaolo RW; Abadie V; Tang F; Fehlner-Peach H; Hall JA; Wang W; Marietta EV; Kasarda DD; Waldmann TA; Murray JA; Semrad C; Kupfer SS; Belkaid Y; Guandalini S; Jabri B. 2011. Co-adjuvant effects of retinoic acid and IL-15 induce inflammatory immunity to dietary antigens. Nature 471(7337):220-4. [PubMed: 21307853]  [MGI Ref ID J:170338]

Dubois SP; Waldmann TA; Muller JR. 2005. Survival adjustment of mature dendritic cells by IL-15. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102(24):8662-7. [PubMed: 15932944]  [MGI Ref ID J:99726]

Fontenot JD; Rasmussen JP; Gavin MA; Rudensky AY. 2005. A function for interleukin 2 in Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells. Nat Immunol 6(11):1142-51. [PubMed: 16227984]  [MGI Ref ID J:112602]

Gong D; Malek TR. 2007. Cytokine-dependent Blimp-1 expression in activated T cells inhibits IL-2 production. J Immunol 178(1):242-52. [PubMed: 17182561]  [MGI Ref ID J:141935]

Guimond MJ; Luross JA; Wang B; Terhorst C; Danial S; Croy BA. 1997. Absence of natural killer cells during murine pregnancy is associated with reproductive compromise in TgE26 mice. Biol Reprod 56(1):169-79. [PubMed: 9002646]  [MGI Ref ID J:134589]

Jin H; Gong D; Adeegbe D; Bayer AL; Rolle C; Yu A; Malek TR. 2006. Quantitative assessment concerning the contribution of IL-2R{beta} for superantigen-mediated T cell responses in vivo. Int Immunol 18(4):565-72. [PubMed: 16540525]  [MGI Ref ID J:107065]

Kung JT; Beller D; Ju ST. 1998. Lymphokine regulation of activation-induced apoptosis in T cells of IL-2 and IL-2R beta knockout mice. Cell Immunol 185(2):158-63. [PubMed: 9636694]  [MGI Ref ID J:114259]

Kuwajima S; Sato T; Ishida K; Tada H; Tezuka H; Ohteki T. 2006. Interleukin 15-dependent crosstalk between conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells is essential for CpG-induced immune activation. Nat Immunol 7(7):740-6. [PubMed: 16715101]  [MGI Ref ID J:112665]

Lin GH; Snell LM; Wortzman ME; Clouthier DL; Watts TH. 2013. GITR-Dependent Regulation of 4-1BB Expression: Implications for T Cell Memory and Anti-4-1BB-Induced Pathology. J Immunol 190(9):4627-39. [PubMed: 23536631]  [MGI Ref ID J:195515]

Lochner M; Peduto L; Cherrier M; Sawa S; Langa F; Varona R; Riethmacher D; Si-Tahar M; Di Santo JP; Eberl G. 2008. In vivo equilibrium of proinflammatory IL-17+ and regulatory IL-10+ Foxp3+ RORgamma t+ T cells. J Exp Med 205(6):1381-93. [PubMed: 18504307]  [MGI Ref ID J:137020]

Malek TR; Porter BO; Codias EK; Scibelli P; Yu A. 2000. Normal lymphoid homeostasis and lack of lethal autoimmunity in mice containing mature T cells with severely impaired IL-2 receptors. J Immunol 164(6):2905-14. [PubMed: 10706676]  [MGI Ref ID J:60910]

Malek TR; Yu A; Scibelli P; Lichtenheld MG; Codias EK. 2001. Broad programming by IL-2 receptor signaling for extended growth to multiple cytokines and functional maturation of antigen-activated T cells. J Immunol 166(3):1675-83. [PubMed: 11160210]  [MGI Ref ID J:67102]

Malek TR; Yu A; Vincek V; Scibelli P; Kong L. 2002. CD4 regulatory T cells prevent lethal autoimmunity in IL-2Rbeta-deficient mice. Implications for the nonredundant function of IL-2. Immunity 17(2):167-78. [PubMed: 12196288]  [MGI Ref ID J:113547]

Marks L; Levy RB. 2004. The cytotoxic potential of regulatory T cells: what has been learned from gene knockout model systems? Transplantation 77(1 Suppl):S19-22. [PubMed: 14726764]  [MGI Ref ID J:87708]

Masse GX; Corcuff E; Decaluwe H; Bommhardt U; Lantz O; Buer J; Di Santo JP. 2007. gamma(c) cytokines provide multiple homeostatic signals to naive CD4(+) T cells. Eur J Immunol 37(9):2606-16. [PubMed: 17683114]  [MGI Ref ID J:124346]

Masse GX; Corcuff E; Strick-Marchand H; Guy-Grand D; Tafuri-Bladt A; Albert ML; Lantz O; Di Santo JP. 2007. Gamma c cytokines condition the progressive differentiation of CD4+ T cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104(39):15442-7. [PubMed: 17855567]  [MGI Ref ID J:125207]

Minagawa M; Watanabe H; Miyaji C; Tomiyama K; Shimura H; Ito A; Ito M; Domen J; Weissman IL; Kawai K. 2002. Enforced Expression of Bcl-2 Restores the Number of NK Cells, But Does Not Rescue the Impaired Development of NKT Cells or Intraepithelial Lymphocytes, in IL-2/IL-15 Receptor beta-Chain-Deficient Mice. J Immunol 169(8):4153-60. [PubMed: 12370344]  [MGI Ref ID J:79539]

Moro K; Yamada T; Tanabe M; Takeuchi T; Ikawa T; Kawamoto H; Furusawa J; Ohtani M; Fujii H; Koyasu S. 2010. Innate production of T(H)2 cytokines by adipose tissue-associated c-Kit(+)Sca-1(+) lymphoid cells. Nature 463(7280):540-4. [PubMed: 20023630]  [MGI Ref ID J:156764]

Ohteki T; Suzue K; Maki C; Ota T; Koyasu S. 2001. Critical role of IL-15-IL-15R for antigen-presenting cell functions in the innate immune response. Nat Immunol 2(12):1138-43. [PubMed: 11702064]  [MGI Ref ID J:125660]

Oida T; Suzuki K; Nanno M; Kanamori Y; Saito H; Kubota E; Kato S; Itoh M; Kaminogawa S; Ishikawa H. 2000. Role of gut cryptopatches in early extrathymic maturation of intestinal intraepithelial T cells. J Immunol 164(7):3616-26. [PubMed: 10725718]  [MGI Ref ID J:112139]

Petitto JM; Huang Z; Hartemink DA; Beck R. 2002. IL-2/15 receptor-beta gene deletion alters neurobehavioral performance. Brain Res 929(2):218-25. [PubMed: 11864627]  [MGI Ref ID J:75444]

Porter BO; Malek TR. 1999. IL-2Rbeta/IL-7Ralpha doubly deficient mice recapitulate the thymic and intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) developmental defects of gammac-/- mice: roles for both IL-2 and IL-15 in CD8alphaalpha IEL development. J Immunol 163(11):5906-12. [PubMed: 10570276]  [MGI Ref ID J:58655]

Poussier P; Ning T; Chen J; Banerjee D; Julius M. 2000. Intestinal inflammation observed in IL-2R/IL-2 mutant mice is associated with impaired intestinal T lymphopoiesis [see comments] Gastroenterology 118(5):880-91. [PubMed: 10784587]  [MGI Ref ID J:61842]

Ramsey C; Rubinstein MP; Kim DM; Cho JH; Sprent J; Surh CD. 2008. The lymphopenic environment of CD132 (common gamma-chain)-deficient hosts elicits rapid homeostatic proliferation of naive T cells via IL-15. J Immunol 180(8):5320-6. [PubMed: 18390713]  [MGI Ref ID J:134238]

Rifa'i M; Kawamoto Y; Nakashima I; Suzuki H. 2004. Essential roles of CD8+CD122+ regulatory T cells in the maintenance of T cell homeostasis. J Exp Med 200(9):1123-34. [PubMed: 15520244]  [MGI Ref ID J:94912]

Satoh-Takayama N; Dumoutier L; Lesjean-Pottier S; Ribeiro VS; Mandelboim O; Renauld JC; Vosshenrich CA; Di Santo JP. 2009. The natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp46 is dispensable for IL-22-mediated innate intestinal immune defense against Citrobacter rodentium. J Immunol 183(10):6579-87. [PubMed: 19846871]  [MGI Ref ID J:157183]

Satoh-Takayama N; Vosshenrich CA; Lesjean-Pottier S; Sawa S; Lochner M; Rattis F; Mention JJ; Thiam K; Cerf-Bensussan N; Mandelboim O; Eberl G; Di Santo JP. 2008. Microbial flora drives interleukin 22 production in intestinal NKp46+ cells that provide innate mucosal immune defense. Immunity 29(6):958-70. [PubMed: 19084435]  [MGI Ref ID J:142654]

Schreiber TH; Wolf D; Tsai MS; Chirinos J; Deyev VV; Gonzalez L; Malek TR; Levy RB; Podack ER. 2010. Therapeutic Treg expansion in mice by TNFRSF25 prevents allergic lung inflammation. J Clin Invest 120(10):3629-40. [PubMed: 20890040]  [MGI Ref ID J:165331]

Snow JW; Abraham N; Ma MC; Herndier BG; Pastuszak AW; Goldsmith MA. 2003. Loss of tolerance and autoimmunity affecting multiple organs in STAT5A/5B-deficient mice. J Immunol 171(10):5042-50. [PubMed: 14607901]  [MGI Ref ID J:106737]

Soper DM; Kasprowicz DJ; Ziegler SF. 2007. IL-2Rbeta links IL-2R signaling with Foxp3 expression. Eur J Immunol 37(7):1817-26. [PubMed: 17559173]  [MGI Ref ID J:123613]

Suzuki H; Duncan GS; Takimoto H; Mak TW. 1997. Abnormal development of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and peripheral natural killer cells in mice lacking the IL-2 receptor beta chain. J Exp Med 185(3):499-505. [PubMed: 9053450]  [MGI Ref ID J:39045]

Suzuki H; Zhou YW; Kato M; Mak TW; Nakashima I. 1999. Normal regulatory alpha/beta T cells effectively eliminate abnormally activated T cells lacking the interleukin 2 receptor beta in vivo. J Exp Med 190(11):1561-72. [PubMed: 10587347]  [MGI Ref ID J:58802]

Teague RM; Tempero RM; Thomas S; Murali-Krishna K; Nelson BH. 2004. Proliferation and differentiation of CD8+ T cells in the absence of IL-2/15 receptor beta-chain expression or STAT5 activation. J Immunol 173(5):3131-9. [PubMed: 15322173]  [MGI Ref ID J:92706]

Tsunobuchi H; Nishimura H; Goshima F; Daikoku T; Suzuki H; Nakashima I; Nishiyama Y; Yoshikai Y. 2000. A protective role of interleukin-15 in a mouse model for systemic infection with herpes simplex virus Virology 275(1):57-66. [PubMed: 11017787]  [MGI Ref ID J:64859]

Van Maele L; Carnoy C; Cayet D; Songhet P; Dumoutier L; Ferrero I; Janot L; Erard F; Bertout J; Leger H; Sebbane F; Benecke A; Renauld JC; Hardt WD; Ryffel B; Sirard JC. 2010. TLR5 signaling stimulates the innate production of IL-17 and IL-22 by CD3(neg)CD127+ immune cells in spleen and mucosa. J Immunol 185(2):1177-85. [PubMed: 20566828]  [MGI Ref ID J:162022]

Vang KB; Yang J; Mahmud SA; Burchill MA; Vegoe AL; Farrar MA. 2008. IL-2, -7, and -15, but not thymic stromal lymphopoeitin, redundantly govern CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cell development. J Immunol 181(5):3285-90. [PubMed: 18714000]  [MGI Ref ID J:138950]

Vosshenrich CA; Lesjean-Pottier S; Hasan M; Richard-Le Goff O; Corcuff E; Mandelboim O; Di Santo JP. 2007. CD11cloB220+ interferon-producing killer dendritic cells are activated natural killer cells. J Exp Med 204(11):2569-78. [PubMed: 17923507]  [MGI Ref ID J:126100]

Ye SK; Maki K; Lee HC; Ito A; Kawai K; Suzuki H; Mak TW; Chien Y; Honjo T; Ikuta K. 2001. Differential roles of cytokine receptors in the development of epidermal gamma delta T cells. J Immunol 167(4):1929-34. [PubMed: 11489972]  [MGI Ref ID J:120415]

Yu A ; Zhu L ; Altman NH ; Malek TR. 2009. A low interleukin-2 receptor signaling threshold supports the development and homeostasis of T regulatory cells. Immunity 30(2):204-17. [PubMed: 19185518]  [MGI Ref ID J:146654]

Yu A; Malek TR. 2006. Selective availability of IL-2 is a major determinant controlling the production of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells. J Immunol 177(8):5115-21. [PubMed: 17015695]  [MGI Ref ID J:139453]

Zhang X; Fujii H; Kishimoto H; LeRoy E; Surh CD; Sprent J. 2002. Aging leads to disturbed homeostasis of memory phenotype CD8(+) cells. J Exp Med 195(3):283-93. [PubMed: 11828003]  [MGI Ref ID J:124828]

Health & husbandry

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryWhen maintaining a live colony, heterozygous mice may be bred together, to wildtype mice from the colony or to C57BL/6J inbred mice. Homozygous mice become sickly and die around 8-12 weeks of age. Coat color expected from breeding is black.

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $2525.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3283.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Control Information

  Control
   Wild-type from the colony
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
Surgical and Preconditioning Services
JAX® Services
Customer Services and Support
Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
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Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


For Licensing and Use Restrictions view the link(s) below:
- Use of MICE by companies or for-profit entities requires a license prior to shipping.

Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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