Strain Name:

B6.129S2-Crhtm1Maj/J

Stock Number:

003114

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Availability:

Cryopreserved - Ready for recovery

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Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Specieslaboratory mouse
Background Strain C57BL/6J
Donor Strain 129S2 via D3 ES cell line
 
Donating Investigator IMR Colony,   The Jackson Laboratory

Description
Mice homozygous for the Crhtm1Maj targeted mutation are viable and fertile. Pups born to homozygous mothers must be supplemented with corticosterone in the drinking water from day 12 of gestation until weaning. Homozygous mice have reduced adrenocortical secretion following stress. They may be susceptible to complications from hypoglycemia when fasting. Heterozygous mice are phenotypically indistinguishable from normal wildtype siblings.

Development
This strain was developed in the laboratory of Dr. Joseph Majzoub at Children's Hospital, Boston. The vector containing Pgk-neo replaced the entire coding region of the endogenous gene. The 129S2/SvPas-derived D3 ES cell line was used. The strain was backcrossed to C57BL/6J in the IMR colony.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying   Crhtm1Maj allele
002783   B6;129S2-Crhtm1Maj/J
View Strains carrying   Crhtm1Maj     (1 strain)

Strains carrying other alleles of Crh
012704   B6(Cg)-Crhtm1(cre)Zjh/J
011087   B6;FVB-Tg(Crh-cre)1Kres/J
View Strains carrying other alleles of Crh     (2 strains)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Crhtm1Maj/Crhtm1Maj

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * C57BL/6J
  • respiratory system phenotype
  • abnormal lung morphology
    • homozygous pups born from homozygous females display lung dysplasia with hypercellularity of the lungs, thickened alveolar septae, and fewer air spaces   (MGI Ref ID J:23082)
    • lung morphology is normal in homozygous pups born from homozygous females given corticosterone during pregnancy and lactation or from heterozygous females   (MGI Ref ID J:23082)
    • thick pulmonary interalveolar septum
      • homozygous pups born from homozygous females display thickened alveolar septae   (MGI Ref ID J:23082)
  • abnormal respiratory system physiology
    • alveolar surface tension is increased in homozygous pups born from homozygous females but not in pups born from homozygous females given corticosterone during pregnancy and lactation or heterozygous females   (MGI Ref ID J:23082)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal circulating corticosterone level
    • increase in plasma levels of corticosterone in response to restraint-induced stress or fasting is severely reduced or absent; this reduction in response is greater in males than in females   (MGI Ref ID J:23082)
  • abnormal circulating glucose level
    • homozygotes develop hypoglycemia after 24 hours of fasting unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:23082)
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • abnormal adrenal gland morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:23082)
    • abnormal zona fasciculata morphology
      • the zona fasciculata appears atrophied and this atrophy is more severe in homozygous males than in homozygous females   (MGI Ref ID J:23082)
      • however, the zona glomerulosa of the adrenal gland and the entire pituitary gland appear normal   (MGI Ref ID J:23082)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • *normal* nervous system phenotype
    • morphology of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus appears normal   (MGI Ref ID J:23082)
  • other phenotype
  • maternal effect
    • all homozygous pups born from homozygous females die within 12 hours of birth; however, homozygous pups born from heterozygous females are viable and fertile   (MGI Ref ID J:23082)
    • homozygous pups born from homozygous, but not from heterozygous, females display lung dysplasia   (MGI Ref ID J:23082)

Crhtm1Maj/Crhtm1Maj

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * C57BL/6
  • respiratory system phenotype
  • abnormal Clara cell morphology
    • at E18.5 in offspring from homozygous crosses, maturation of Clara cells appears delayed   (MGI Ref ID J:53721)
  • abnormal lung development
    • at E17.5 and E18.5 in offspring from homozygous crosses, lung retain an immature dense pseudoglandular appearance with little or no formation of airspaces unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:53721)
    • at E17.5 and E18.5 in offspring from homozygous crosses, lung wet and dry weight and total DNA content are increased and at E18.5 cell proliferation of proximal and distal epithelial cells and proximal mesenchymal cells is increased   (MGI Ref ID J:53721)
    • at E18.5 in offspring from homozygous crosses, maturation of Clara and pulmonary neuroendocrine cells appears delayed   (MGI Ref ID J:53721)
    • increased mesenchymal cell proliferation involved in lung development
      • at E18.5 cell proliferation of proximal mesenchymal cells is increased   (MGI Ref ID J:53721)
  • abnormal surfactant composition
    • at E17.5 in offspring from homozygous crosses, expression of some surfactant proteins is reduced and the concentration of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC, a surfact lipid commonly used to indicate lung maturity) in amniotic fluid is decreased; however, by E18.5 amniotic levels of DPPC are similar to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:53721)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal adrenocorticotropin level
    • 40 minutes after insulin-induced hypoglycemia fasted male and female homozygotes do not display an increase in plasma adrenocorticotropin levels unlike fasted wild-type male or heterozygous female mice   (MGI Ref ID J:102987)
    • the increase in plasma adrenocorticotropin levels normally seen during restraint is markedly decreased in homozygotes; however restraint-induced increases in plasma IL-6 levels are similar to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:102987)
    • adrenocorticotropin levels are elevated in wild-type but not homozygous mice at 1hour after intramuscular injection of 100ul turpentine oil; however no significant induction is seen in either group at most later times   (MGI Ref ID J:72196)
  • abnormal circulating glucose level
    • 40 minutes after insulin injection (15 U/kg), fasted female homozygotes have a significantly greater decrease in plasma glucose levels compared to heterozygous females   (MGI Ref ID J:102987)
    • however, in the absence of insulin injection glucose levels are not significantly lower in fasted male or female homozygotes than in wild-type mice and injection of fasted male   (MGI Ref ID J:102987)
    • homozygotes with 1 U/kg insulin did not result in a greater reduction in plasma glucose compared to wild-type males   (MGI Ref ID J:102987)
    • after 36 hours of fasting plasma glucose levels fall unlike in wild-type mice, while plasma insulin levels decrease in both wild-type and homozygous mice   (MGI Ref ID J:105629)
  • abnormal circulating hormone level
    • plasma levels of corticosteroids are about 6-fold lower in homozygotes compared to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:90690)
    • abnormal circulating adrenaline level
      • after 36 hours of fasting plasma adrenaline levels do not increase unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:105629)
      • decreased circulating adrenaline level
        • basal and insulin-stimulated epinephrine levels are decrease in homozygous females compared to heterozygotes; however, no significant difference is seen in epinephrine levels between homozygous and wild-type male mice   (MGI Ref ID J:102987)
    • abnormal circulating corticosterone level
      • fasted male homozygotes have decreased plasma corticosterone compared to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:102987)
      • 40 minutes after insulin induced hypoglycemia fasted male homozygotes display a attenuated increase in plasma corticosterone compared to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:102987)
      • 40 minutes after insulin induced hypoglycemia fasted female homozygotes do not display an increase in corticosterone levels above that seen in homozygous females after vehicle injection, unlike heterozygous females   (MGI Ref ID J:102987)
      • corticosterone levels are elevated in wild-type but not homozygous mice for up to 4 hours after intramuscular injection of 100ul turpentine oil; however by 8 hours after injection corticosterone levels are elevated in both groups   (MGI Ref ID J:72196)
      • following anesthesia and surgery no increase in corticosterone levels is seen unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:90690)
      • following 5 hours of restraint or food withdrawal the increase in corticosterone levels is decreased compared to wild-type mice; however, changes in lutenizing hormone levels are similar to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:54256)
      • after 36 hours of fasting plasma corticosterone levels do not increase unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:105629)
      • decreased circulating corticosterone level
        • plasma corticosterone levels are decreased compared to wild-type mice and do not show the normal diurnal variation in levels   (MGI Ref ID J:105629)
    • abnormal circulating noradrenaline level
      • after 36 hours of fasting plasma noradrenaline levels do not increase unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:105629)
    • decreased circulating leptin level
      • plasma leptin levels are decreased compared to wild-type mice and do not show the normal diurnal variation in levels   (MGI Ref ID J:105629)
      • corticosterone supplementation restores the normal fasting induced decrease in leptin levels   (MGI Ref ID J:105629)
  • increased circulating interleukin-6 level
    • after intramuscular injection of 100ul turpentine oil plasma IL-6 levels are elevated in 2- to 3-fold more in homozygous mice compared to wild-type mice; plasma IL-6 levels are similar in wild-type and homozygous mice injected with saline   (MGI Ref ID J:72196)
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal cell-mediated immunity   (MGI Ref ID J:98419)
    • abnormal professional antigen presenting cell physiology
      • homozygous antigen presenting cells incubated with a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide induce less proliferation of wild-type CD4+ T cells compared to wild-type antigen presenting cells   (MGI Ref ID J:98419)
    • decreased T cell proliferation
      • proliferation of CD4+ T cells in response to T cell receptor stimuli is decreased compared to wild-type controls   (MGI Ref ID J:98419)
  • abnormal cytokine secretion
    • purified CD4+ T cells stimulated with antigen presenting cells produce less IL2 and IFNG suggesting a defect in T cell receptor stimulated activation   (MGI Ref ID J:98419)
    • purified CD4+ T cells stimulated with low concentrations of anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies (strong stimulus) or any concentration of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (weak stimulus) produce more IL5   (MGI Ref ID J:98419)
  • abnormal inflammatory response   (MGI Ref ID J:98419)
    • decreased inflammatory response
      • leukocyte infiltration after intramuscular injection of 100ul turpentine oil is significantly less in homozygotes compared to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:72196)
      • injection of ileal loops with purified toxin A results in a significantly smaller increase in fluid secretion, reduced epithelial damage, congestion and edema, decreased neutrophil infiltration, and no increase in TAC1 levels or immunostaining in homozygotes   (MGI Ref ID J:90690)
  • decreased susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
    • severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is reduced in homozygotes (mean maximal score 0.081 +/- 0.9 versus 1.71 +/- 0.8 in wild-type mice); this includes reduced infiltration of CD4+ cells and marcophages in to the central nervous system   (MGI Ref ID J:98419)
    • incidence of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is reduced in homozygotes but the time of onset is similar to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:98419)
  • increased circulating interleukin-6 level
    • after intramuscular injection of 100ul turpentine oil plasma IL-6 levels are elevated in 2- to 3-fold more in homozygous mice compared to wild-type mice; plasma IL-6 levels are similar in wild-type and homozygous mice injected with saline   (MGI Ref ID J:72196)
  • increased splenocyte number
    • naive homozygotes have in increased number of splenocytes however no difference is seen between homozygotes and wild-type mice after immunization   (MGI Ref ID J:98419)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • abnormal body weight
    • during a 36 hour fast homozygotes lose less weight and after fasting gain the weight back more slowly compared to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:105629)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal food intake
    • following a 36 hour fast homozygotes eat less food than wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:105629)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • decreased T cell proliferation
    • proliferation of CD4+ T cells in response to T cell receptor stimuli is decreased compared to wild-type controls   (MGI Ref ID J:98419)
  • increased splenocyte number
    • naive homozygotes have in increased number of splenocytes however no difference is seen between homozygotes and wild-type mice after immunization   (MGI Ref ID J:98419)
  • integument phenotype
  • abnormal epidermis stratum corneum morphology
    • at E17.5 in offspring from homozygous crosses, the stratum corneum is absent or if present is only 1 cell layer thick and lacks the normal membrane localization of polar lipids and organization of lamellar body-derived material into lamellar structures   (MGI Ref ID J:49863)
    • however, at birth a normal multilayered stratum corneum is present   (MGI Ref ID J:49863)
    • supplementation of homozygous females with corticosterone during pregnancy rescues the delay in stratum corneum development in homozygous pups   (MGI Ref ID J:49863)
  • abnormal epidermis stratum granulosum morphology
    • at E17.5 in offspring from homozygous crosses, the granular is absent; however, a normal granular layer is present at birth   (MGI Ref ID J:49863)
    • supplementation of homozygous females with corticosterone during pregnancy rescues the delay in granular layer development in homozygous pups   (MGI Ref ID J:49863)
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • abnormal solitary pulmonary neuroendocrine cell morphology
    • at E18.5 in offspring from homozygous crosses, maturation of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells appears delayed   (MGI Ref ID J:53721)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal solitary pulmonary neuroendocrine cell morphology
    • at E18.5 in offspring from homozygous crosses, maturation of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells appears delayed   (MGI Ref ID J:53721)
  • cellular phenotype
  • increased mesenchymal cell proliferation involved in lung development
    • at E18.5 cell proliferation of proximal mesenchymal cells is increased   (MGI Ref ID J:53721)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Crhtm1Maj related

Developmental Biology Research
Internal/Organ Defects
      lung, homozygous fetus from homozygous mother
Neurodevelopmental Defects

Endocrine Deficiency Research
Adrenal Cortex Defects
Hypothalamus/Pituitary Defects

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
Inflammation

Neurobiology Research
Behavioral and Learning Defects

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Crhtm1Maj
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Joseph Majzoub
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Common Name(s) CRH -; CRH KO; CRH-KO; CRHKO;
Mutation Made ByDr. Joseph Majzoub,   Children's Hospital Boston
Strain of Origin129S2/SvPas
ES Cell Line NameD3
ES Cell Line Strain129S2/SvPas
Gene Symbol and Name Crh, corticotropin releasing hormone
Chromosome 3
Gene Common Name(s) CRF; Gm1347; LOC383938; corticotropin releasing factor; corticotropin-releasing factor; gene model 1347, (NCBI);
Molecular Note The sequences encoding the pre-propeptide region were replaced by a neomycin resistance cassette. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the transcript was absent in whole brain RNA derived from homozygous mice. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the protein was not detectable in sections of the amygdala and cerebral cortex of brains of homozygous mice. [MGI Ref ID J:17994] [MGI Ref ID J:23082] [MGI Ref ID J:47705]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Crhtm1Maj, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Muglia L; Jacobson L; Dikkes P; Majzoub JA. 1995. Corticotropin-releasing hormone deficiency reveals major fetal but not adult glucocorticoid need. Nature 373(6513):427-32. [PubMed: 7830793]  [MGI Ref ID J:23082]

Additional References

Crhtm1Maj related

Anton PM; Gay J; Mykoniatis A; Pan A; O'Brien M; Brown D; Karalis K; Pothoulakis C. 2004. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) requirement in Clostridium difficile toxin A-mediated intestinal inflammation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101(22):8503-8. [PubMed: 15159534]  [MGI Ref ID J:90690]

Benou C; Wang Y; Imitola J; VanVlerken L; Chandras C; Karalis KP; Khoury SJ. 2005. Corticotropin-releasing hormone contributes to the peripheral inflammatory response in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. J Immunol 174(9):5407-13. [PubMed: 15843539]  [MGI Ref ID J:98419]

Bethin KE; Vogt SK; Muglia LJ. 2000. Interleukin-6 is an essential, corticotropin-releasing hormone-independent stimulator of the adrenal axis during immune system activation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97(16):9317-22. [PubMed: 10922080]  [MGI Ref ID J:126698]

Boyle MP; Brewer JA; Funatsu M; Wozniak DF; Tsien JZ; Izumi Y; Muglia LJ. 2005. Acquired deficit of forebrain glucocorticoid receptor produces depression-like changes in adrenal axis regulation and behavior. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102(2):473-8. [PubMed: 15623560]  [MGI Ref ID J:96260]

Brewer JA; Bethin KE; Schaefer ML; Muglia LM; Vogt SK; Weninger SC; Majzoub JA; Muglia LJ. 2003. Dissecting adrenal and behavioral responses to stress by targeted gene inactivation in mice. Stress 6(2):121-5. [PubMed: 12775331]  [MGI Ref ID J:97729]

Dunn AJ. 2000. Footshock-induced changes in brain catecholamines and indoleamines are not mediated by CRF or ACTH. Neurochem Int 37(1):61-9. [PubMed: 10781846]  [MGI Ref ID J:62346]

Dunn AJ; Swiergiel AH. 1999. Behavioral responses to stress are intact in CRF-deficient mice. Brain Res 845(1):14-20. [PubMed: 10529439]  [MGI Ref ID J:107793]

Fukuda Y; Kageyama K; Nigawara T; Kasagi Y; Suda T. 2004. Effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) on the synthesis and secretion of proopiomelanocortin-related peptides in the anterior pituitary: a study using CRH-deficient mice. Neurosci Lett 367(2):201-4. [PubMed: 15331153]  [MGI Ref ID J:120178]

Gay J; Kokkotou E; O'Brien M; Pothoulakis C; Karalis KP. 2008. Corticotropin-releasing hormone deficiency is associated with reduced local inflammation in a mouse model of experimental colitis. Endocrinology 149(7):3403-9. [PubMed: 18403481]  [MGI Ref ID J:145371]

Giardino WJ; Pastor R; Anacker AM; Spangler E; Cote DM; Li J; Stenzel-Poore MP; Phillips TJ; Ryabinin AE. 2011. Dissection of corticotropin-releasing factor system involvement in locomotor sensitivity to methamphetamine. Genes Brain Behav 10(1):78-89. [PubMed: 20731720]  [MGI Ref ID J:183524]

Hanada T; Date Y; Shimbara T; Sakihara S; Murakami N; Hayashi Y; Kanai Y; Suda T; Kangawa K; Nakazato M. 2003. Central actions of neuromedin U via corticotropin-releasing hormone. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 311(4):954-8. [PubMed: 14623274]  [MGI Ref ID J:113584]

Hanley K; Feingold KR; Komuves LG; Elias PM; Muglia LJ; Majzoub JA; Williams ML. 1998. Glucocorticoid deficiency delays stratum corneum maturation in the fetal mouse. J Invest Dermatol 111(3):440-4. [PubMed: 9740238]  [MGI Ref ID J:49863]

Jacobson L. 1999. Lower weight loss and food intake in protein-deprived, corticotropin releasing hormone-deficient mice correlate with glucocorticoid insufficiency. Endocrinology 140(8):3543-51. [PubMed: 10433210]  [MGI Ref ID J:56918]

Jacobson L; Ansari T; Potts J; McGuinness OP. 2006. Glucocorticoid-deficient corticotropin-releasing hormone knockout mice maintain glucose requirements but not autonomic responses during repeated hypoglycemia. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 291(1):E15-22. [PubMed: 16449297]  [MGI Ref ID J:110574]

Jacobson L; Muglia LJ; Weninger SC; Pac inverted question markak K; Majzoub JA. 2000. CRH deficiency impairs but does not block pituitary-adrenal responses to diverse stressors. Neuroendocrinology 71(2):79-87. [PubMed: 10686522]  [MGI Ref ID J:102987]

Jacobson L; Pacak K. 2005. Combined corticotropin-releasing hormone and glucocorticoid deficiency does not enhance counterregulatory responses after recurrent hypoglycemia in mice. Metabolism 54(9):1259-65. [PubMed: 16125539]  [MGI Ref ID J:100899]

Jeong KH; Jacobson L; Pacak K; Widmaier EP; Goldstein DS; Majzoub JA. 2000. Impaired basal and restraint-induced epinephrine secretion in corticotropin-releasing hormone-deficient mice. Endocrinology 141(3):1142-50. [PubMed: 10698191]  [MGI Ref ID J:60634]

Jeong KH; Jacobson L; Widmaier EP; Majzoub JA. 1999. Normal suppression of the reproductive axis following stress in corticotropin-releasing hormone-deficient mice. Endocrinology 140(4):1702-8. [PubMed: 10098506]  [MGI Ref ID J:54256]

Jeong KH; Sakihara S; Widmaier EP; Majzoub JA. 2004. Impaired leptin expression and abnormal response to fasting in corticotropin-releasing hormone-deficient mice. Endocrinology 145(7):3174-81. [PubMed: 15033910]  [MGI Ref ID J:105629]

Jurkovicova D; Kubovcakova L; Hudecova S; Kvetnansky R; Krizanova O. 2006. Adrenergic modulation of the type 1 IP3 receptors in the rat heart. Biochim Biophys Acta 1763(1):18-24. [PubMed: 16377004]  [MGI Ref ID J:108401]

Kariagina A; Romanenko D; Ren SG; Chesnokova V. 2004. Hypothalamic-pituitary cytokine network. Endocrinology 145(1):104-12. [PubMed: 14512435]  [MGI Ref ID J:87425]

Makino S; Tanaka Y; Nazarloo HP; Noguchi T; Nishimura K; Hashimoto K. 2005. Expression of type 1 corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptor mRNA in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus following restraint stress in CRH-deficient mice. Brain Res 1048(1-2):131-7. [PubMed: 15919058]  [MGI Ref ID J:99166]

Muglia LJ; Bae DS; Brown TT; Vogt SK; Alvarez JG; Sunday ME; Majzoub JA. 1999. Proliferation and differentiation defects during lung development in corticotropin-releasing hormone-deficient mice. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 20(2):181-8. [PubMed: 9922208]  [MGI Ref ID J:53721]

Muglia LJ; Jacobson L; Luedke C; Vogt SK; Schaefer ML; Dikkes P; Fukuda S; Sakai Y; Suda T; Majzoub JA. 2000. Corticotropin-releasing hormone links pituitary adrenocorticotropin gene expression and release during adrenal insufficiency. J Clin Invest 105(9):1269-77. [PubMed: 10792002]  [MGI Ref ID J:111831]

Muglia LJ; Jacobson L; Weninger SC; Luedke CE; Bae DS; Jeong KH ; Majzoub JA. 1997. Impaired diurnal adrenal rhythmicity restored by constant infusion of corticotropin-releasing hormone in corticotropin-releasing hormone-deficient mice. J Clin Invest 99(12):2923-9. [PubMed: 9185516]  [MGI Ref ID J:41187]

Muglia LJ; Jenkins NA; Gilbert DJ; Copeland NG; Majzoub JA. 1994. Expression of the mouse corticotropin-releasing hormone gene in vivo and targeted inactivation in embryonic stem cells. J Clin Invest 93(5):2066-72. [PubMed: 8182138]  [MGI Ref ID J:17994]

Nakamura K; Stokes JB; McCray PB Jr. 2002. Endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoid regulation of ENaC mRNA expression in developing kidney and lung. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 283(3):C762-72. [PubMed: 12176733]  [MGI Ref ID J:107770]

Nostramo R; Tillinger A; Serova L; Kvetnansky R; Sabban EL. 2013. Bradykinin B2 receptor in the adrenal medulla of male rats and mice: glucocorticoid-dependent increase with immobilization stress. Endocrinology 154(10):3729-38. [PubMed: 24025224]  [MGI Ref ID J:204081]

Pournajafi Nazarloo H; Tanaka Y; Dorobantu M; Hashimoto K. 2003. Modulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 2 mRNA expression by CRH deficiency or stress in the mouse heart. Regul Pept 115(2):131-8. [PubMed: 12972328]  [MGI Ref ID J:102439]

Rassouli O; Liapakis G; Lazaridis I; Sakellaris G; Gkountelias K; Gravanis A; Margioris AN; Karalis KP; Venihaki M. 2011. A Novel Role of Peripheral Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone (CRH) on Dermal Fibroblasts. PLoS One 6(7):e21654. [PubMed: 21765902]  [MGI Ref ID J:174939]

Samaco RC; Mandel-Brehm C; McGraw CM; Shaw CA; McGill BE; Zoghbi HY. 2012. Crh and Oprm1 mediate anxiety-related behavior and social approach in a mouse model of MECP2 duplication syndrome. Nat Genet 44(2):206-11. [PubMed: 22231481]  [MGI Ref ID J:181213]

Sato Y; Suzuki H; Sato T; Suda T; Yoda T; Iwakura Y; Chida D. 2010. The role of endogenous glucocorticoids in lymphocyte development in melanocortin receptor 2-deficient mice. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 403(3-4):253-7. [PubMed: 21056545]  [MGI Ref ID J:167055]

Schmid J; Ludwig B; Schally AV; Steffen A; Ziegler CG; Block NL; Koutmani Y; Brendel MD; Karalis KP; Simeonovic CJ; Licinio J; Ehrhart-Bornstein M; Bornstein SR. 2011. Modulation of pancreatic islets-stress axis by hypothalamic releasing hormones and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108(33):13722-7. [PubMed: 21825133]  [MGI Ref ID J:175991]

Swiergiel AH; Dunn AJ. 1999. CRF-deficient mice respond like wild-type mice to hypophagic stimuli. Pharmacol Biochem Behav 64(1):59-64. [PubMed: 10494998]  [MGI Ref ID J:59478]

Tillinger A; Nostramo R; Kvetnansky R; Serova L; Sabban EL. 2013. Stress-induced changes in gene expression of urocortin 2 and other CRH peptides in rat adrenal medulla: involvement of glucocorticoids. J Neurochem :. [PubMed: 23320836]  [MGI Ref ID J:195175]

Venihaki M; Carrigan A; Dikkes P; Majzoub JA. 2000. Circadian rise in maternal glucocorticoid prevents pulmonary dysplasia in fetal mice with adrenal insufficiency. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97(13):7336-41. [PubMed: 10861000]  [MGI Ref ID J:62908]

Venihaki M; Dikkes P; Carrigan A; Karalis KP. 2001. Corticotropin-releasing hormone regulates IL-6 expression during inflammation. J Clin Invest 108(8):1159-66. [PubMed: 11602623]  [MGI Ref ID J:72196]

Venihaki M; Zhao J; Karalis KP. 2003. Corticotropin-releasing hormone deficiency results in impaired splenocyte response to lipopolysaccharide. J Neuroimmunol 141(1-2):3-9. [PubMed: 12965248]  [MGI Ref ID J:108728]

Weninger SC; Dunn AJ; Muglia LJ; Dikkes P; Miczek KA; Swiergiel AH; Berridge CW; Majzoub JA. 1999. Stress-induced behaviors require the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptor, but not CRH. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96(14):8283-8. [PubMed: 10393986]  [MGI Ref ID J:119893]

Weninger SC; Muglia LJ; Jacobson L; Majzoub JA. 1999. CRH-deficient mice have a normal anorectic response to chronic stress. Regul Pept 84(1-3):69-74. [PubMed: 10535410]  [MGI Ref ID J:59697]

Weninger SC; Peters LL; Majzoub JA. 2000. Urocortin expression in the Edinger-Westphal nucleus is up-regulated by stress and corticotropin-releasing hormone deficiency. Endocrinology 141(1):256-63. [PubMed: 10614646]  [MGI Ref ID J:47705]

Health & husbandry

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryWhen maintaining a live colony, these mice are maintained by mating homozygous siblings accompanied by maternal corticosterone treatment. Alternatively, heterozygous females can be bred to homozygous males; this strategy requires no corticosterone treatment.

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $2525.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Frozen Products

Price (US dollars $)
Frozen Embryo $1650.00

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryopreserved Embryos
    Available to most shipping destinations1
    This strain is also available as cryopreserved embryos2. Orders for cryopreserved embryos may be placed with our Customer Service Department. Experienced technicians at The Jackson Laboratory have recovered frozen embryos of this strain successfully. We will provide you enough embryos to perform two embryo transfers. The Jackson Laboratory does not guarantee successful recovery at your facility. For complete information on purchasing embryos, please visit our Cryopreserved Embryos web page.

    1 Shipments cannot be made to Australia due to Australian government import restrictions.
    2 Embryos for most strains are cryopreserved at the two cell stage while some strains are cryopreserved at the eight cell stage. If this information is important to you, please contact Customer Service.
  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3283.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Frozen Products

Price (US dollars $)
Frozen Embryo $2145.00

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryopreserved Embryos
    Available to most shipping destinations1
    This strain is also available as cryopreserved embryos2. Orders for cryopreserved embryos may be placed with our Customer Service Department. Experienced technicians at The Jackson Laboratory have recovered frozen embryos of this strain successfully. We will provide you enough embryos to perform two embryo transfers. The Jackson Laboratory does not guarantee successful recovery at your facility. For complete information on purchasing embryos, please visit our Cryopreserved Embryos web page.

    1 Shipments cannot be made to Australia due to Australian government import restrictions.
    2 Embryos for most strains are cryopreserved at the two cell stage while some strains are cryopreserved at the eight cell stage. If this information is important to you, please contact Customer Service.
  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
Surgical and Preconditioning Services
JAX® Services
Customer Services and Support
Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
Technical Support Email Form

Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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