Strain Name:

B6.129S2-Pomctm1Low/J

Stock Number:

003191

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Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Former Names B6.129S2-Pomc1tm1Low/J    (Changed: 07-MAY-08 )
B6.129S2-Pomctm1Low    (Changed: 15-DEC-04 )
Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Specieslaboratory mouse
Background Strain C57BL/6
Donor Strain 129S2 via D3 ES cell line
 
Donating InvestigatorDr. Malcolm J Low,   University of Michigan Medical School

Appearance
black
Related Genotype: a/a

Description
Mice homozygous for the Pomctm1Low targeted mutation are viable and fertile. Homozygous mutant mice display no overt developmental or behavioral abnormalities. The hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal axis functions normally. Homozygotes do display significantly greater nonopioid analgesia in response to cold water swim stress compared with controls and display paradoxical naloxone-induced analgesia. Male mice show an altered growth curve during puberty resulting in increased body mass and white fat. This phenotype is present in both the homozygous mutant males and in wildtype males reared by homozygous parents. This strain is useful for looking at response to pain.

Development
The gene targeting vector POMCX*4 encoding a truncated POMC prohormone caused by a point mutation in exon 3 and containing the phosphoglycerate kinase-neo and phosphoglycerate kinase-tk selection cassettes was constructed and electroporated into D3 embryonic stem cells. Correctly targeted ES cells were microinjected into C56BL/6 blastocysts.Per the investigator:

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

View Strains carrying other alleles of Pomc     (7 strains)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
- Potential model based on gene homology relationships. Phenotypic similarity to the human disease has not been tested.
Obesity   (POMC)
Proopiomelanocortin Deficiency   (POMC)
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Pomctm1Low/Pomctm1Low

        B6.129S2-Pomctm1Low
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal behavior
    • mutants do not show reduced sensitivity to morphine seen in wild-type mice following partial sciatic nerve ligation (pSNL); sensitivity is similar to sham-ligated controls   (MGI Ref ID J:122110)
    • abnormal alcohol consumption
      • after 9 day, mice acquire ethanol self-administration unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:49706)
      • increased alcohol consumption
        • over time, mice increase their consumption of ethanol unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:49706)
    • abnormal operant conditioning behavior
      • mice exhibit increased rate of response when nose-pokes resulted in alcohol administration unlike similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:49706)
    • hyperactivity elicited by ethanol administration   (MGI Ref ID J:49706)
    • impaired conditioned place preference behavior
      • after training with 5 mg/kg morphine, wild-type mice with pSNL spend less time in the drug-paired compartment than mutants with pSNL; morphine conditioned place preference is not different with or without pSNL in mutants   (MGI Ref ID J:122110)
    • polyphagia
      • male mice exhibit increased food intake compared with wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
      • male mice treated with neuropeptide Y (NPY) exhibit a greater increase in food intake compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
  • adipose tissue phenotype
  • *normal* adipose tissue phenotype
    • mice exhibit normal intrascapular brown fat weight   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
    • increased fat cell size
    • increased gonadal fat pad weight
      • 2-fold in male mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
    • increased inguinal fat pad weight
      • inguinal fat pad weight is increased 2-fold in male mice compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
      • however, over-expression of the gene in the pituitary partially rescues the phenotype while over-expression in the central nervous system completely rescues the phenotype   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
    • increased renal fat pad weight
      • 2-fold in male mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
    • increased retroperitoneal fat pad weight
      • retroperitoneal fat pad weight is increased 2-fold in male mice compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
      • however, over-expression of the gene in the pituitary partially rescues the phenotype while over-expression in the central nervous system completely rescues the phenotype   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
    • increased total body fat amount
      • total body fat amount is increased 50% in male mice compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
      • however, female mice exhibit normal fat content   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • *normal* homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
    • male mice exhibit normal basal metabolic rate (oxygen consumption and respiratory quotient) and T4 serum levels   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
    • abnormal adrenaline level
      • mice fed a high fat diet exhibit an increase in urinary adrenaline levels compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113139)
    • abnormal response/metabolism to endogenous compounds
      • mice treated with neuropeptide Y (NPY) exhibit a greater increase in food intake than similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
    • abnormal urine catecholamine level
      • mice fed a high fat diet exhibit an increase in urinary adrenaline levels compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113139)
    • impaired glucose tolerance
      • in obese male mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
    • increased circulating insulin level
      • in obese male mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
    • increased circulating leptin level
      • in obese male mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
    • increased physiological sensitivity to xenobiotic
      • naloxone-treated mice exhibit a greater decrease in food intake than similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • increased body weight   (MGI Ref ID J:113139)
    • starting at 4 weeks and continuing through adulthood, male mice exhibit an increase in body weight compared with wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
    • between 4 and 8 weeks, female mice exhibit an increase in body weight compared with wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
    • however, over-expression of the gene in the pituitary partially rescues the phenotype while over-expression in the central nervous system completely rescues the phenotype   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
    • obese
  • increased total body fat amount
    • total body fat amount is increased 50% in male mice compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
    • however, female mice exhibit normal fat content   (MGI Ref ID J:115712)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • increased systemic arterial systolic blood pressure
    • after two weeks on a high salt diet   (MGI Ref ID J:113139)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal neuron physiology
    • mice fed a high salt diet exhibit a greater increase in Fos-Li neurons in the median preoptic nucleus compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113139)
  • renal/urinary system phenotype
  • abnormal urine catecholamine level
    • mice fed a high fat diet exhibit an increase in urinary adrenaline levels compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:113139)

Pomctm1Low/Pomctm1Low

        B6.129S2-Pomctm1Low/J
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • *normal* behavior/neurological phenotype
    • mice exhibit normal sleep patterns   (MGI Ref ID J:84463)
    • increased aggression towards mice
      • while the number of clinches is normal, mice transferred to the cage of an aggressive dominant conspecific exhibit increased signs of aggression compared with similarly treated wild-type mice that exhibit freezing or fleeing   (MGI Ref ID J:84463)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • increased circulating corticosterone level
    • slightly after 1 hour of social conflict   (MGI Ref ID J:84463)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • increased body weight   (MGI Ref ID J:84463)

The following phenotype information may relate to a genetic background differing from this JAX® Mice strain.

Pomctm1Low/Pomc+

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * 129X1/SvJ * C57BL/6 * DBA/2
  • tumorigenesis
  • increased pituitary adenoma incidence
    • melanotroph adenomas   (MGI Ref ID J:119240)

Pomctm1Low/Pomctm1Low

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * C57BL/6N
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal behavioral response to addictive substance
    • mice exhibit decreased mild swim-stress analgesia (measured by abdominal constriction) compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:47711)
    • naloxone-treated mice exhibit an increase in mild swim-stress analgesia (measured by abdominal constriction) while similarly treated wild-type mice exhibit a decreased in mild swim-stress analgesia   (MGI Ref ID J:47711)
    • mice lack opioid stress-induced analgesia compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:47711)
    • however, un-stressed mice exhibit normal analgesic response to morphine   (MGI Ref ID J:47711)
  • abnormal touch/ nociception
    • following a swim stress at 10 degrees Celsius, mice exhibit increased analgesia (measured by hotplate assay) compared with wild-type mice regardless of naloxone treatment   (MGI Ref ID J:47711)
    • mice exhibit decreased mild swim-stress analgesia (measured by abdominal constriction) compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:47711)
    • naloxone-treated mice exhibit an increase in mild swim-stress analgesia (measured by abdominal constriction) while similarly treated wild-type mice exhibit a decreased in mild swim-stress analgesia   (MGI Ref ID J:47711)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • increased body weight
    • after the onset of puberty   (MGI Ref ID J:47711)
  • integument phenotype
  • abnormal touch/ nociception
    • following a swim stress at 10 degrees Celsius, mice exhibit increased analgesia (measured by hotplate assay) compared with wild-type mice regardless of naloxone treatment   (MGI Ref ID J:47711)
    • mice exhibit decreased mild swim-stress analgesia (measured by abdominal constriction) compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:47711)
    • naloxone-treated mice exhibit an increase in mild swim-stress analgesia (measured by abdominal constriction) while similarly treated wild-type mice exhibit a decreased in mild swim-stress analgesia   (MGI Ref ID J:47711)

Pomctm1Low/Pomctm1Low

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * C57BL/6
  • immune system phenotype
  • increased circulating interleukin-6 level
    • in LPS-treated mice   (MGI Ref ID J:102955)
  • increased interleukin-6 secretion
    • in LPS-treated splenocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:102955)
  • increased splenocyte proliferation
    • in response to LPS or Con A treatment   (MGI Ref ID J:102955)
  • increased tumor necrosis factor secretion
    • in LPS-treated splenocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:102955)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • decreased circulating adrenocorticotropin level
    • LPS-treated mice do not exhibit as much of an increased in circulating adrenocorticotropin levels as in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:102955)
  • decreased circulating corticosterone level
    • LPS-treated mice do not exhibit as much of an increased in circulating corticosterone levels as in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:102955)
  • increased circulating interleukin-6 level
    • in LPS-treated mice   (MGI Ref ID J:102955)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • increased splenocyte proliferation
    • in response to LPS or Con A treatment   (MGI Ref ID J:102955)
  • cellular phenotype
  • increased splenocyte proliferation
    • in response to LPS or Con A treatment   (MGI Ref ID J:102955)

Pomctm1Low/Pomctm1Low

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * 129S6/SvEvTac * C57BL/6
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • obese

Pomctm1Low/Pomctm1Low

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * C57BL/6 * Swiss albino
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • obese

Pomctm1Low/Pomctm1Low

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * 129X1/SvJ * C57BL/6 * DBA/2
  • mortality/aging
  • partial perinatal lethality
    • 60% of mice die by P1   (MGI Ref ID J:119240)
    • however, mice that survive P1 exhibit normal survival   (MGI Ref ID J:119240)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • decreased adrenocorticotropin level
    • in the pituitary and hypothalamus   (MGI Ref ID J:119240)
    • decreased circulating adrenocorticotropin level
  • decreased circulating corticosterone level
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • abnormal zona fasciculata morphology
    • the zona fasciculata is decreased in height compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:119240)
    • the columnar cells arrangement is replaced by disorganized, densely packed cells with scant cytoplasm unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:119240)
  • small adrenal glands   (MGI Ref ID J:119240)
  • tumorigenesis
  • increased pituitary adenoma incidence
    • corticotroph and melanotroph adenomas   (MGI Ref ID J:119240)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Pomctm1Low related

Diabetes and Obesity Research
Obesity Without Diabetes

Neurobiology Research
Behavioral and Learning Defects

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Pomctm1Low
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Malcolm J Low
Allele Type Targeted (knock-out)
Common Name(s) End-; POMCX*4-; beta-END-; betaend-;
Mutation Made ByDr. Malcolm Low,   University of Michigan Medical School
Strain of Origin129S2/SvPas
ES Cell Line NameD3
ES Cell Line Strain129S2/SvPas
Gene Symbol and Name Pomc, pro-opiomelanocortin-alpha
Chromosome 12
Gene Common Name(s) ACTH; BE; CLIP; LPH; MSH; NPP; POC; Pomc-1; Pomc1; Pomc2; adrenal corticotropic hormone; alpha-MSH; alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone; alphaMSH; beta-MSH; beta-endorphin; beta-melanocyte stimulating hormone; gamma-MSH; gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone;
General Note Additional reference J:65685 identifies the ES cell line origin as 129S2/SvEv. It is more likely that the mice used in this additional reference were derived from the targeted D3 ES cells (129S2/SvPas) first generated in J:78759 and implanted in mice in J:47711.
Molecular Note A PGK-neomycin based targeting vector was used to introduce a premature start codon into exon 3, resulting in the truncation of the translated protein. In situ hybridization on homozygous mutant animals demonstrates that the truncation event had no effect on the distribution or level of transcript. Immunoreactivity demonstrated that Homozygous mutant mice had no detectable beta endorphin activity in the hypothalamus or pituitary [MGI Ref ID J:78759]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Pomctm1Low, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Rubinstein M; Mogil JS; Japon M; Chan EC; Allen RG; Low MJ. 1996. Absence of opioid stress-induced analgesia in mice lacking beta-endorphin by site-directed mutagenesis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 93(9):3995-4000. [PubMed: 8633004]  [MGI Ref ID J:47711]

Additional References

Grahame NJ; Low MJ; Cunningham CL. 1998. Intravenous self-administration of ethanol in beta-endorphin-deficient mice. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 22(5):1093-8. [PubMed: 9726280]  [MGI Ref ID J:49706]

Grisel JE; Mogil JS; Grahame NJ; Rubinstein M; Belknap JK; Crabbe JC; Low MJ. 1999. Ethanol oral self-administration is increased in mutant mice with decreased beta-endorphin expression. Brain Res 835(1):62-7. [PubMed: 10448196]  [MGI Ref ID J:56440]

Vaanholt LM; Turek FW; Meerlo P. 2003. Beta-endorphin modulates the acute response to a social conflict in male mice but does not play a role in stress-induced changes in sleep. Brain Res 978(1-2):169-76. [PubMed: 12834911]  [MGI Ref ID J:84463]

Pomctm1Low related

Appleyard SM; Hayward M; Young JI; Butler AA; Cone RD; Rubinstein M; Low MJ. 2003. A role for the endogenous opioid beta-endorphin in energy homeostasis. Endocrinology 144(5):1753-60. [PubMed: 12697680]  [MGI Ref ID J:115712]

Bilkei-Gorzo A; Erk S; Schurmann B; Mauer D; Michel K; Boecker H; Scheef L; Walter H; Zimmer A. 2012. Dynorphins regulate fear memory: from mice to men. J Neurosci 32(27):9335-43. [PubMed: 22764240]  [MGI Ref ID J:185956]

Bilkei-Gorzo A; Racz I; Michel K; Mauer D; Zimmer A; Klingmuller D; Zimmer A. 2008. Control of hormonal stress reactivity by the endogenous opioid system. Psychoneuroendocrinology 33(4):425-36. [PubMed: 18280051]  [MGI Ref ID J:141622]

Caeiro X; Hansen C; Garcia N; Vivas L. 2006. beta-Endorphin involvement in the regulatory response to body sodium overload. Neuroscience 142(2):557-65. [PubMed: 16887279]  [MGI Ref ID J:113139]

Franchini LF; Rubinstein M; Vivas L. 2003. Reduced sodium appetite and increased oxytocin gene expression in mutant mice lacking beta-endorphin. Neuroscience 121(4):875-81. [PubMed: 14580937]  [MGI Ref ID J:109383]

Gendron L; Pintar JE; Chavkin C. 2007. Essential role of mu opioid receptor in the regulation of delta opioid receptor-mediated antihyperalgesia. Neuroscience 150(4):807-17. [PubMed: 17997230]  [MGI Ref ID J:130771]

Grahame NJ; Low MJ; Cunningham CL. 1998. Intravenous self-administration of ethanol in beta-endorphin-deficient mice. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 22(5):1093-8. [PubMed: 9726280]  [MGI Ref ID J:49706]

Grisel JE; Mogil JS; Grahame NJ; Rubinstein M; Belknap JK; Crabbe JC; Low MJ. 1999. Ethanol oral self-administration is increased in mutant mice with decreased beta-endorphin expression. Brain Res 835(1):62-7. [PubMed: 10448196]  [MGI Ref ID J:56440]

Hayward MD; Hansen ST; Pintar JE; Low MJ. 2004. Operant self-administration of ethanol in C57BL/6 mice lacking beta-endorphin and enkephalin. Pharmacol Biochem Behav 79(1):171-81. [PubMed: 15388297]  [MGI Ref ID J:102302]

Hayward MD; Low MJ. 2005. Naloxone's suppression of spontaneous and food-conditioned locomotor activity is diminished in mice lacking either the dopamine D(2) receptor or enkephalin. Brain Res Mol Brain Res 140(1-2):91-8. [PubMed: 16125819]  [MGI Ref ID J:124309]

Hayward MD; Low MJ. 2007. The contribution of endogenous opioids to food reward is dependent on sex and background strain. Neuroscience 144(1):17-25. [PubMed: 17049174]  [MGI Ref ID J:117943]

Hayward MD; Pintar JE; Low MJ. 2002. Selective reward deficit in mice lacking beta-endorphin and enkephalin. J Neurosci 22(18):8251-8. [PubMed: 12223579]  [MGI Ref ID J:79138]

Mazzuca M; Heurteaux C; Alloui A; Diochot S; Baron A; Voilley N; Blondeau N; Escoubas P; Gelot A; Cupo A; Zimmer A; Zimmer AM; Eschalier A; Lazdunski M. 2007. A tarantula peptide against pain via ASIC1a channels and opioid mechanisms. Nat Neurosci 10(8):943-945. [PubMed: 17632507]  [MGI Ref ID J:123967]

Mogil JS; Grisel JE; Hayward MD; Bales JR; Rubinstein M; Belknap JK; Low MJ. 2000. Disparate spinal and supraspinal opioid antinociceptive responses in beta-endorphin-deficient mutant mice. Neuroscience 101(3):709-17. [PubMed: 11113319]  [MGI Ref ID J:111990]

Niikura K; Narita M; Narita M; Nakamura A; Okutsu D; Ozeki A; Kurahashi K; Kobayashi Y; Suzuki M; Suzuki T. 2008. Direct evidence for the involvement of endogenous beta-endorphin in the suppression of the morphine-induced rewarding effect under a neuropathic pain-like state. Neurosci Lett 435(3):257-62. [PubMed: 18359165]  [MGI Ref ID J:136855]

Niikura K; Narita M; Okutsu D; Tsurukawa Y; Nanjo K; Kurahashi K; Kobayashi Y; Suzuki T. 2008. Implication of endogenous beta-endorphin in the inhibition of the morphine-induced rewarding effect by the direct activation of spinal protein kinase C in mice. Neurosci Lett 433(1):54-8. [PubMed: 18262361]  [MGI Ref ID J:136577]

Nonogaki K; Kaji T; Ohba Y; Sumii M; Wakameda M; Tamari T. 2009. Serotonin 5-HT2C receptor-independent expression of hypothalamic NOR1, a novel modulator of food intake and energy balance, in mice. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 386(2):311-5. [PubMed: 19523439]  [MGI Ref ID J:151527]

Nonogaki K; Ohba Y; Sumii M; Wakameda M; Tamari T. 2009. Novel modulators for body weight changes induced by fasting and re-feeding in mice. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 378(2):249-54. [PubMed: 19017526]  [MGI Ref ID J:143072]

Petraschka M; Li S; Gilbert TL; Westenbroek RE; Bruchas MR; Schreiber S; Lowe J; Low MJ; Pintar JE; Chavkin C. 2007. The absence of endogenous beta-endorphin selectively blocks phosphorylation and desensitization of mu opioid receptors following partial sciatic nerve ligation. Neuroscience 146(4):1795-807. [PubMed: 17467916]  [MGI Ref ID J:122110]

Refojo D; Kovalovsky D; Young JI; Rubinstein M; Holsboer F; Reul JM; Low MJ; Arzt E. 2002. Increased splenocyte proliferative response and cytokine production in beta-endorphin-deficient mice. J Neuroimmunol 131(1-2):126-34. [PubMed: 12458044]  [MGI Ref ID J:102955]

Rubinstein M; Japon MA; Low MJ. 1993. Introduction of a point mutation into the mouse genome by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells using a replacement type vector with a selectable marker. Nucleic Acids Res 21(11):2613-7. [PubMed: 8392702]  [MGI Ref ID J:78759]

Skoubis PD; Lam HA; Shoblock J; Narayanan S; Maidment NT. 2005. Endogenous enkephalins, not endorphins, modulate basal hedonic state in mice. Eur J Neurosci 21(5):1379-84. [PubMed: 15813947]  [MGI Ref ID J:101075]

Slugg RM; Hayward MD; Ronnekleiv OK; Low MJ; Kelly MJ. 2000. Effect of the &mgr;-opioid agonist DAMGO on medial basal hypothalamic neurons in beta-endorphin knockout mice Neuroendocrinology 72(4):208-17. [PubMed: 11070424]  [MGI Ref ID J:65685]

Smart JL; Tolle V; Low MJ. 2006. Glucocorticoids exacerbate obesity and insulin resistance in neuron-specific proopiomelanocortin-deficient mice. J Clin Invest 116(2):495-505. [PubMed: 16440060]  [MGI Ref ID J:105426]

Smart JL; Tolle V; Otero-Corchon V; Low MJ. 2007. Central dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in neuron-specific proopiomelanocortin-deficient mice. Endocrinology 148(2):647-59. [PubMed: 17095588]  [MGI Ref ID J:119240]

Tolle V; Low MJ. 2008. In vivo evidence for inverse agonism of Agouti-related peptide in the central nervous system of proopiomelanocortin-deficient mice. Diabetes 57(1):86-94. [PubMed: 17909095]  [MGI Ref ID J:132419]

Trigo JM; Zimmer A; Maldonado R. 2009. Nicotine anxiogenic and rewarding effects are decreased in mice lacking beta-endorphin. Neuropharmacology 56(8):1147-53. [PubMed: 19376143]  [MGI Ref ID J:157284]

Vaanholt LM; Turek FW; Meerlo P. 2003. Beta-endorphin modulates the acute response to a social conflict in male mice but does not play a role in stress-induced changes in sleep. Brain Res 978(1-2):169-76. [PubMed: 12834911]  [MGI Ref ID J:84463]

Health & husbandry

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryThis strain may be maintained by mating homozygous siblings. Male offspring of homozygote beta-endorphin deficient parents have increased weight and white adipose tissue as adults compared to rearing by wildtype mothers. Expected coat color from breeding:Black

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $2450.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Embryos

Price (US dollars $)
Frozen Embryo $1600.00

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryopreserved Embryos
    Available to most shipping destinations1
    This strain is also available as cryopreserved embryos2. Orders for cryopreserved embryos may be placed with our Customer Service Department. Experienced technicians at The Jackson Laboratory have recovered frozen embryos of this strain successfully. We will provide you enough embryos to perform two embryo transfers. The Jackson Laboratory does not guarantee successful recovery at your facility. For complete information on purchasing embryos, please visit our Cryopreserved Embryos web page.

    1 Shipments cannot be made to Australia due to Australian government import restrictions.
    2 Embryos for most strains are cryopreserved at the two cell stage while some strains are cryopreserved at the eight cell stage. If this information is important to you, please contact Customer Service.
  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.
    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 11 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice
    Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3185.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Embryos

Price (US dollars $)
Frozen Embryo $2080.00

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryopreserved Embryos
    Available to most shipping destinations1
    This strain is also available as cryopreserved embryos2. Orders for cryopreserved embryos may be placed with our Customer Service Department. Experienced technicians at The Jackson Laboratory have recovered frozen embryos of this strain successfully. We will provide you enough embryos to perform two embryo transfers. The Jackson Laboratory does not guarantee successful recovery at your facility. For complete information on purchasing embryos, please visit our Cryopreserved Embryos web page.

    1 Shipments cannot be made to Australia due to Australian government import restrictions.
    2 Embryos for most strains are cryopreserved at the two cell stage while some strains are cryopreserved at the eight cell stage. If this information is important to you, please contact Customer Service.
  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.
    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 11 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice
    Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
Surgical and Preconditioning Services
JAX® Services
Customer Services and Support
Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
Technical Support Email Form

Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


For Licensing and Use Restrictions view the link(s) below:
- Use of MICE by companies or for-profit entities requires a license prior to shipping.

Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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