Strain Name:

STOCK Shhtm1Amc/J

Stock Number:

003318

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Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Type Mutant Stock; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
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Specieslaboratory mouse
 
Donating Investigator Andrew P McMahon,   University of Southern California

Appearance
agouti
Related Genotype: A/?

black
Related Genotype: a/a

Description
Mice homozygous for the Shhtm1Amc targeted mutation display early defects in the establishment and maintenance of midline structures. These defects result from the critical role the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) gene plays in the patterning patterning of vertebrate embryonic tissues, including the brain and spinal cord, the axial skeleton and the limbs. Defects are also observed in all tissues, confirming the proposed role of SHH proteins as an extracellular signal required for the tissue-organizing properties of several vertebrate patterning centers.

When bred to a strain with loxP sites inserted into the same targeted allele (Stock No. 004293) and a strain expressing Cre recombinase in the skin and dental epithelium (Stock No. 004782), this mutant mouse strain may be useful in studies of hedgehog signalling and cell proliferation in the dental epithelium.

When bred to a strain with loxP sites inserted into the same targeted allele (Stock No. 004293) and a strain expressing Cre recombinase in the mesonephric duct and its developmental derivatives (Stock No. 004692), this mutant mouse strain may be useful in studies of hedgehog signalling and cell proliferation/differentiation in mesenchymal cells of the kidney.

Control Information

  Control
   Wild-type from the colony
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Facebase: models
007664   129S-Efnb1tm1Sor/J
000646   A/J
000647   A/WySnJ
005709   B6.129-Skitm1Cco/J
002619   B6.129-Tgfb3tm1Doe/J
007453   B6.129P2(Cg)-Dhcr7tm1Gst/J
010525   B6.129S-Notch2tm3Grid/J
010616   B6.129S1-Jag1tm1Grid/J
010546   B6.129S1-Jag2tm1Grid/J
010620   B6.129S1-Notch2tm1Grid/J
009387   B6.129S1-Osr1tm1Jian/J
009386   B6.129S1-Osr2tm1Jian/J
010621   B6.129S1-Snai1tm2.1Grid/J
010617   B6.129S1-Snai2tm1Grid/J
003865   B6.129S2-Itgavtm1Hyn/J
003755   B6.129S4-Meox2tm1(cre)Sor/J
016902   B6.129S5-Irf6Gt(OST398253)Lex/J
003336   B6.129S7-Cdkn1ctm1Sje/J
012843   B6.129X1(Cg)-Slc32a1tm1.1Bgc/J
000026   B6.C3-Gli3Xt-J/J
004275   B6.Cg-Fignfi/Frk
012844   B6.Cg-Gad1tm1.1Bgc/J
006382   B6;129-Casktm1Sud/J
002711   B6;129-Gabrb3tm1Geh/J
004293   B6;129-Shhtm2Amc/J
012603   B6;129-Tgfbr2tm1Karl/J
010618   B6;129S-Jag1tm2Grid/J
010686   B6;129S-Snai1tm2Grid/J
009389   B6;129S1-Bambitm1Jian/J
010619   B6;129S1-Lfngtm1Grid/J
010547   B6;129S1-Notch3tm1Grid/J
010544   B6;129S1-Notch4tm1Grid/J
010722   B6;129S1-Snai2tm2Grid/J
012463   B6;129S4-Foxd1tm1(GFP/cre)Amc/J
022358   B6;129S6-Rr23tm1Axvi/Mmjax
022359   B6;129S6-Rr24tm1Axvi/Mmjax
022360   B6;129S6-Rr25tm1Axvi/Mmjax
003277   B6;129S7-Acvr2atm1Zuk/J
002788   B6;129S7-Fsttm1Zuk/J
002990   B6;129S7-Inhbatm1Zuk/J
000523   B6By.Cg-Eh/J
000278   B6C3Fe a/a-Papss2bm Hps1ep Hps6ru/J
000515   B6CBACa Aw-J/A-SfnEr/J
001434   C3HeB/FeJ x STX/Le-Mc1rE-so Gli3Xt-J Zeb1Tw/J
000252   DC/LeJ
005057   FVB.129-Kcnj2tm1Swz/J
012655   FVB.A-Irf6clft1/BeiJ
013100   FVB.C-Prdm16csp1/J
017437   FVB/N-Ckap5TgTn(sb-cHS4,Tyr)2320F-1Ove/J
017438   FVB/N-MidnTg(Tyr)2261EOve/J
017609   FVB/N-Rr16Tn(sb-Tyr)1HCebOve/J
017598   FVB/N-Sdccag8Tn(sb-Tyr)2161B.CA1C2Ove/J
017608   FVB/N-Skor2Tn(sb-Tyr)1799B.CA7BOve/J
017436   FVB/N-Tapt1TgTn(sb-cHS4,Tyr)2508GOve/J
016870   FVB/NJ-Ap2b1Tg(Tyr)427Ove/EtevJ
017434   FVB;B6-Cramp1lTgTn(sb-rtTA,Tyr)2447AOve/J
017594   FVB;B6-Eya4TgTn(Prm1-sb10,sb-Tyr)1739AOve/J
017435   FVB;B6-SlmapTn(sb-rtTA)2426B.SB4Ove/J
003102   STOCK Tgfb2tm1Doe/J
018624   STOCK Tgfb3tm2(Tgfb1)Vk/J
008469   STOCK Wnt9btm1.2Amc/J
View Facebase: models     (61 strains)

Strains carrying other alleles of Shh
000214   B10.D2/nSn-ShhHx/J
005623   B6.129S6-Shhtm2(cre/ERT2)Cjt/J
008466   B6.129X1(Cg)-Shhtm6Amc/J
005622   B6.Cg-Shhtm1(EGFP/cre)Cjt/J
004293   B6;129-Shhtm2Amc/J
011031   B6;129S4-Shhtm1.1Rseg/J
View Strains carrying other alleles of Shh     (6 strains)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
- Potential model based on gene homology relationships. Phenotypic similarity to the human disease has not been tested.
Holoprosencephaly 3; HPE3   (SHH)
Microphthalmia, Isolated, with Coloboma 5; MCOPCB5   (SHH)
Schizencephaly   (SHH)
Solitary Median Maxillary Central Incisor; SMMCI   (SHH)
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Shhtm1Amc/Shhtm1Amc

        STOCK Shhtm1Amc/J
  • digestive/alimentary phenotype
  • abnormal submandibular gland morphology
    • at E13.5 and E15.5, homozygotes show a severely reduced, dysplastic remnant of the submandibular salivary gland (SMG)   (MGI Ref ID J:89200)
    • at E18.5, homozygotes display a slightly larger but severely pedomorphic dysplastic SMG consisting of largely undifferentiated epithelium with very few branches surrounded by undifferentiated mesenchyme (reminiscent of the Pseudoglandular stage at ~E14)   (MGI Ref ID J:89200)
    • in vitro, Pseudoglandular (E14) stage SMG primordia cultured in the presence of Shh show a ~2-fold increase in epithelial branching compared with Initial Bud (E13) stage primordia, indicating a stage-specific difference in Shh-stimulated branching   (MGI Ref ID J:89200)
    • cyclopamine-treated explants show a marked reduction in branching and epithelial cell proliferation; notably FGF8-supplemented explants exhibit a significant 58% increase in branching morphogenesis compared with cyclopamine treatment alone   (MGI Ref ID J:89200)
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • abnormal submandibular gland morphology
    • at E13.5 and E15.5, homozygotes show a severely reduced, dysplastic remnant of the submandibular salivary gland (SMG)   (MGI Ref ID J:89200)
    • at E18.5, homozygotes display a slightly larger but severely pedomorphic dysplastic SMG consisting of largely undifferentiated epithelium with very few branches surrounded by undifferentiated mesenchyme (reminiscent of the Pseudoglandular stage at ~E14)   (MGI Ref ID J:89200)
    • in vitro, Pseudoglandular (E14) stage SMG primordia cultured in the presence of Shh show a ~2-fold increase in epithelial branching compared with Initial Bud (E13) stage primordia, indicating a stage-specific difference in Shh-stimulated branching   (MGI Ref ID J:89200)
    • cyclopamine-treated explants show a marked reduction in branching and epithelial cell proliferation; notably FGF8-supplemented explants exhibit a significant 58% increase in branching morphogenesis compared with cyclopamine treatment alone   (MGI Ref ID J:89200)

The following phenotype information may relate to a genetic background differing from this JAX® Mice strain.

Shhtm1Amc/Shhtm1Amc

        Background Not Specified
  • mortality/aging
  • complete neonatal lethality
    • homozygous mutants die shortly after birth   (MGI Ref ID J:91723)
  • digestive/alimentary phenotype
  • small stomach
    • reduced stomach size, particularly in the fore-stomach, at E12.5   (MGI Ref ID J:98520)
  • tracheoesophageal fistula
    • a single tracheal-esophageal tube lacking any cartilaginous rings is seen   (MGI Ref ID J:91723)
    • this tube is lined with stratified squamous epithelium dorsally and columnar airway epithelium ventrally   (MGI Ref ID J:91723)
  • respiratory system phenotype
  • abnormal branching involved in lung morphogenesis
    • branching morphogenesis is impaired with the single tracheal-esophageal tube connected to the proximal and peripheral lung structures   (MGI Ref ID J:91723)
  • abnormal bronchus morphology
    • peripheral tubules are absent   (MGI Ref ID J:91723)
  • abnormal pharynx morphology
    • the pharynx is closed anteriorly   (MGI Ref ID J:91723)
  • absent tracheal cartilage rings
    • the cartilaginous rings that normally surround the trachea are absent   (MGI Ref ID J:91723)
  • pulmonary hypoplasia
    • lungs are severely hypoplastic   (MGI Ref ID J:91723)
    • the anterior closed pharynx connects to a posteroir bilobed lung in which the central airway is surrounded only by rudimentary peripheral saccules   (MGI Ref ID J:91723)
  • tracheoesophageal fistula
    • a single tracheal-esophageal tube lacking any cartilaginous rings is seen   (MGI Ref ID J:91723)
    • this tube is lined with stratified squamous epithelium dorsally and columnar airway epithelium ventrally   (MGI Ref ID J:91723)
  • skeleton phenotype
  • absent tracheal cartilage rings
    • the cartilaginous rings that normally surround the trachea are absent   (MGI Ref ID J:91723)

Shhtm1Amc/Shhtm1Amc

        involves: 129/Sv * C57BL/6J * CBA/J
  • mortality/aging
  • complete perinatal lethality
    • none of the homozygotes surviving to term live beyond this time   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
  • partial prenatal lethality
    • only ~50% of homozygotes survive to term   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
  • digestive/alimentary phenotype
  • abnormal digestive system morphology
    • at 18.5 dpc, homozygotes display a smaller gastrointestinal tract relative to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:62158)
    • abnormal colon morphology
      • at 18.5 dpc, the mutant colon ends in a blind dilation that is not fused to the surface ectoderm; however, no aganglionic colon is observed   (MGI Ref ID J:62158)
    • abnormal digestive organ placement
      • at 18.5 dpc, all homozygotes display an obvious malrotation of the gut, in the absence of reversions in gut situs   (MGI Ref ID J:62158)
    • abnormal esophagus morphology
      • at 18.5 dpc, the mutant esophagus tissue is reduced and fused to the trachea   (MGI Ref ID J:62158)
      • tracheoesophageal fistula
        • at 18.5 dpc, the mutant trachea and esophagus are fused to form a fistula-like fusion of the alimentary and respiratory tract   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
    • abnormal small intestine morphology
      • at 18.5 dpc, homozygotes show a 21% reduction in thickness of the circular smooth muscle layer along the small intestine; however, no intestinal dilation is observed   (MGI Ref ID J:62158)
      • abnormal duodenum morphology
        • at 18.5 dpc, 67% of homozygotes display occlusion of the duodenum by overgrown villi, resembling duodenal stenosis   (MGI Ref ID J:62158)
    • abnormal stomach glandular epithelium morphology
      • at 18.5 dpc, the mutant glandular epithelium displays histologic features that resemble intestinal metaplasia   (MGI Ref ID J:62158)
    • anal atresia
      • at 18.5 dpc, all homozygotes have an imperforate anus   (MGI Ref ID J:62158)
    • gastric metaplasia
      • at 18.5 dpc, all homozygotes exhibit intestinal transformation of the stomach epithelium   (MGI Ref ID J:62158)
    • stomach epithelial hyperplasia
      • at 18.5 dpc, all homozygotes display a significant overgrowth of stomach epithelium, in spite of normal rates of cell proliferation in the stomach   (MGI Ref ID J:62158)
  • respiratory system phenotype
  • abnormal lung development
    • although left and right buds form, mutant lungs fail to undergo lobation or subsequent extensive branching   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
    • abnormal lung saccule morphology
      • by 18.5 dpc, only a few air sacs are present   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
    • impaired branching involved in bronchus morphogenesis
      • at 12.5 dpc, mutant lungs fail to branch or display one abnormally positioned branch point   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
      • in organ culture, mutant lungs fail to grow or branch extensively; bronchial mesenchyme cells detach from the endodermal epithelium   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
    • impaired lung lobe morphogenesis
      • mutant lungs fail to undergo lobation   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
  • abnormal lung vasculature morphology
    • poorly vascularized airways   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
  • abnormal tracheal cartilage morphology
    • in mutant trachea, cartilaginous rings are present but appear disorganized   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
  • abnormal tracheal smooth muscle morphology
    • in mutant trachea, the layer of smooth muscle that normally lines the proximal epithelium is absent   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
  • pulmonary hypoplasia
    • at 18.5 dpc, homozygotes display a rudimentary respiratory organ with a few large, poorly vascularized airways   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
  • tracheoesophageal fistula
    • at 18.5 dpc, the mutant trachea and esophagus are fused to form a fistula-like fusion of the alimentary and respiratory tract   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
  • muscle phenotype
  • abnormal smooth muscle morphology
    • at 18.5 dpc, homozygotes show a 21% reduction in thickness of the circular smooth muscle layer along the small intestine   (MGI Ref ID J:62158)
    • abnormal tracheal smooth muscle morphology
      • in mutant trachea, the layer of smooth muscle that normally lines the proximal epithelium is absent   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • decreased fetal size
    • at 18.5 dpc, mutant embryos have an overall reduced size relative to wild-type embryos   (MGI Ref ID J:62158)
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • annular pancreas
    • at 18.5 dpc, 85% of homozygotes exhibit an annular pancreas   (MGI Ref ID J:62158)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal enteric neuron morphology
    • at 18.5 dpc, homozygotes show excessive and abnormally located neurons that differentiate under the epithelium and into the villi   (MGI Ref ID J:62158)
  • skeleton phenotype
  • abnormal tracheal cartilage morphology
    • in mutant trachea, cartilaginous rings are present but appear disorganized   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
  • integument phenotype
  • abnormal dermal layer morphology
    • skin grafts of mutant skin transplanted onto nude mice exhibit a reduced dermal fat layer   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
    • abnormal dermis papillary layer morphology
      • mutant skin displays only a rudimentary dermal papilla, indicating abnormal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
  • abnormal hair follicle morphology
    • at 15.5 dpc, mutant hair follicles form a smaller hair plug; however, epidermal expansion into the dermis and dermal condensation of mesenchyme at the base of the hair plug occur normally   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
    • at 15.5 dpc, wild-type hair follicles have progressed to stage 2, whereas mutant follicles at still at stage 1 or 0   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
    • skin grafts of mutant skin transplanted onto nude mice exhibit giant disorganized hair-bud-like structures, some with hair-shaft-like material, in the vicinity of epidermis   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
    • abnormal hair follicle development
      • homozygotes display delayed hair folliculoenesis: embryonic follicles are arrested shortly after induction and fail to progress beyond stage 2   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
      • at 18.5 dpc, mutant hair follicles at stage 1-2 show a 40% decline in keratinocyte proliferation relative to wild-type; no difference is observed in apoptosis   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
    • absent hair follicle inner root sheath
      • mutant hair follicles fail to initiate development of the inner root sheath from the hair matrix (stages 3-5)   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
    • absent hair follicles
      • by 18.5 dpc, homozygotes show a severe reduction in the number of induced hair follicles relative to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
  • abnormal hair follicle orientation
    • mutant hair buds fail to exhibit an obvious polarity; in contrast, wild-type follicles show a typical polarized development along the anterior-posterior axis   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
  • abnormal hair shaft morphology
    • skin grafts of mutant skin transplanted onto nude mice show abnormal ingrowth of the epidermis and consequently aberrant morphogenesis of the hair shaft   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
  • alopecia
    • skin grafts of mutant skin (epidermis and dermis) transplanted onto nude mice generate hairless, pigmented skin   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
    • some keratinized pigmented material resembling hair matrix is present, but no hair is formed   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
  • decreased keratinocyte proliferation
    • at 18.5 dpc, mutant hair follicles at stage 1-2 show a 40% decline in keratinocyte proliferation relative to wild-type, with no difference observed in apoptosis   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
  • epidermal hyperplasia
    • skin grafts of mutant skin transplanted onto nude mice display hyperplasia and abnormal keratin expression in interfollicular epidermis   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
  • thick epidermis
    • skin grafts of mutant skin transplanted onto nude mice exhibit a thickened epidermis with large disorganized ingrowths   (MGI Ref ID J:50050)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • abnormal lung vasculature morphology
    • poorly vascularized airways   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)
  • cellular phenotype
  • decreased keratinocyte proliferation
    • at 18.5 dpc, mutant hair follicles at stage 1-2 show a 40% decline in keratinocyte proliferation relative to wild-type, with no difference observed in apoptosis   (MGI Ref ID J:50051)

Shhtm1Amc/Shhtm1Amc

        involves: 129S1/Sv * 129X1/SvJ
  • embryogenesis phenotype
  • notochord degeneration
  • nervous system phenotype
  • holoprosencephaly   (MGI Ref ID J:121553)
  • skeleton phenotype
  • abnormal vertebrae morphology
    • all ventral vertebral components are absent   (MGI Ref ID J:121553)

The following phenotype relates to a compound genotype created using this strain.
Contact JAX® Services jaxservices@jax.org for customized breeding options.

Shhtm1Amc/Shhtm2Amc Tg(Hoxb7-cre)13Amc/0

        involves: 129S1/Sv * 129X1/SvJ * C57BL/6   (conditional)
  • renal/urinary system phenotype
  • abnormal kidney inner medulla morphology
    • at 4 months of age, most of the inner medulla is lost in hydronephric kidneys   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
  • abnormal kidney outer medulla inner stripe morphology
    • at 4 months of age, most of the inner stripe of the outer medulla is lost in hydronephric kidneys   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
  • abnormal renal glomerulus morphology
    • at the newborn stage, cortical glomerular density is increased by 24% while glomerular density of the whole kidney is increased by 26% relative to that in wild-type controls   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
    • however, no gross differences in glomerular size are observed   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
    • decreased renal glomerulus number
      • newborn mice exhibit a 40% reduction in glomerular number   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
  • abnormal ureter development
    • at E14.5, fewer mesenchymal cells line the ureteral epithelium relative to wild-type controls   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
    • at E14.5, the mitotic index of the proximal and distal ureter mesenchyme is ~50% of that in wild-type controls, indicating reduced cell proliferation   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
    • however, no differences in ureteral mesenchyme apoptosis are observed by TUNEL analysis   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
  • abnormal ureter smooth muscle morphology
    • a delay in smooth muscle differentiation is observed along the proximodistal axis of the ureter   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
    • at E15.0, no smooth muscle alpha-actin protein (SMA), an early marker of smooth muscle differentiation, is detected at any axial level of the ureter, unlike in wild-type embryos where SMA is detected in the proximal ureter   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
    • at the newborn stage, SMA is detected in the proximal ureter but, in contrast to wild-type controls, almost no SMA is detected in the distal-most part of the ureter, closest to the bladder   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
    • in addition, mesenchymal cells in the distal ureter are not as condensed as those in wild-type controls   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
  • hydronephrosis
    • at 4 months of age, 50% of mice exhibit hydronephrosis   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
    • however, no hydronephrosis is detected in newborn pups   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
  • hydroureter
    • newborn mice exhibit prominent hydroureter, usually more severe in the proximal region   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
  • kidney cortex hypoplasia
    • at the newborn stage, cortical volume is reduced by 51%   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
  • kidney medulla hypoplasia
    • at the newborn stage, medullary volume is reduced by 46%   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
  • short ureter
    • at E14.5, ureter length is ~21% shorter than in wild-type controls   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
  • small kidney
    • neonatal kidneys are 52% smaller than wild-type kidneys   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)
    • renal hypoplasia   (MGI Ref ID J:79481)

Shhtm1Amc/Shhtm2Amc Tg(KRT14-cre)1Amc/0

        involves: 129S1/Sv * 129X1/SvJ * C57BL/6 * CBA   (conditional)
  • mortality/aging
  • complete neonatal lethality
    • mutant newborns die within a day after birth   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
  • craniofacial phenotype
  • abnormal ameloblast morphology
    • at birth, functional odontoblast and ameloblast layers are present but display abnormal polarity and cellular architecture   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
    • when early tooth rudiments (13.5-15.5 dpc) are transplanted under kidney capsules of nude mice, enamel and dentin matrices are deposited in spite of absent ameloblast elongation and odontoblast disorganization   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
  • abnormal cranium morphology
    • at birth, mutant pups display flattened skulls   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
    • abnormal nasal bone morphology
      • at birth, mutant pups display a small frontal nasal process; nasal passageways are severely reduced   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
    • absent alveolar process
      • mutant mandibular molars are fused with the oral ectoderm and the alveolar bone is absent   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
  • abnormal dentin morphology
    • in grafts of early tooth rudiments (13.5-15.5 dpc), dentin deposits are deposited but crown formation is incomplete and resulting teeth are small and abnormally shaped   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
  • abnormal enamel morphology
    • at 14.5 dpc, the outer enamel epithelium of the lingual side is severely reduced and the lingual inner enamel epithelium has not invaginated, suggesting impaired crown formation   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
    • when early tooth rudiments (13.5-15.5 dpc) are transplanted under kidney capsules of nude mice, enamel matrix is secreted but crown formation is incomplete and resulting teeth are small and abnormally shaped   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
  • abnormal incisor morphology
    • at birth, mutant pups display small (only 5% of normal size) and abnormally shaped incisors in both the mandible and maxilla   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
    • mandibular incisors display a single cusp with two symmetrical cervical loops; additional cusp formation is disrupted   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
  • abnormal molar crown morphology
    • mandibular molars display a single irregular cusp; additional cusp formation is disrupted   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
  • arrest of tooth development
    • at birth, mutant pups show absence of obvious teeth: manidbular molars and incisors exhibit a cap stage tooth rudiment of abnormal morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
  • cleft secondary palate
    • 85% exhibit a cleft palate with rudimentary palatal shelves spaced widely apart   (MGI Ref ID J:90909)
    • abnormal palatal shelf fusion at midline
      • the rudimentary palatal shelves are spaced widely apart   (MGI Ref ID J:90909)
    • palatal shelf hypoplasia
      • the palatal shelves fail to develop beyond rudimentary processes   (MGI Ref ID J:90909)
  • growth retardation of incisors
    • at birth, mandibular incisors are more developmentally advanced relative to mandibular molars   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
  • growth retardation of molars
    • at birth, mandibular molars are less developmentally advanced relative to mandibular incisors   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
  • small molars
    • at birth, mutant pups display small and abnormally shaped first molars in both the mandible and maxilla   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
    • maxillary molars are less affected than mandibular molars which are 25% of normal size   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
    • although cervical loops, dental papilla, inner enamel epithelium, predentin, and stellate reticulum are present, no dental cord is formed   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
  • skeleton phenotype
  • *normal* skeleton phenotype
    • at birth, mutant pups possess normal skeletal elements; the upper and lower jaws are of normal length   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
    • abnormal cranium morphology
      • at birth, mutant pups display flattened skulls   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
      • abnormal nasal bone morphology
        • at birth, mutant pups display a small frontal nasal process; nasal passageways are severely reduced   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
      • absent alveolar process
        • mutant mandibular molars are fused with the oral ectoderm and the alveolar bone is absent   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
  • vision/eye phenotype
  • eyelids open at birth   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
  • respiratory system phenotype
  • aerophagia
    • at birth, mutant pups are observed gulping air   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
  • digestive/alimentary phenotype
  • cleft secondary palate
    • 85% exhibit a cleft palate with rudimentary palatal shelves spaced widely apart   (MGI Ref ID J:90909)
    • abnormal palatal shelf fusion at midline
      • the rudimentary palatal shelves are spaced widely apart   (MGI Ref ID J:90909)
    • palatal shelf hypoplasia
      • the palatal shelves fail to develop beyond rudimentary processes   (MGI Ref ID J:90909)
  • integument phenotype
  • absent vibrissae   (MGI Ref ID J:65294)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Shhtm1Amc related

Cancer Research
Genes Regulating Growth and Proliferation
Growth Factors/Receptors/Cytokines
Oncogenes

Cell Biology Research
Genes Regulating Growth and Proliferation

Dermatology Research
Skin and Hair Texture Defects

Developmental Biology Research
Craniofacial and Palate Defects
Embryonic Lethality (Homozygous)
Eye Defects
Growth Defects
Internal/Organ Defects
Neural Tube Defects
Neurodevelopmental Defects
Postnatal Lethality
Skeletal Defects

Neurobiology Research
Neural Tube Defects
Neurodevelopmental Defects

Sensorineural Research
Eye Defects

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Shhtm1Amc
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Andrew P McMahon
Allele Type Targeted (knock-out)
Common Name(s) Shh-; Shhn;
Mutation Made ByDr. Paula Lewis,   AstraZeneca, R&D Boston
Strain of Origin(129X1/SvJ x 129S1/Sv)F1-Kitl<+>
ES Cell Line NameR1
ES Cell Line Strain(129X1/SvJ x 129S1/Sv)F1-Kitl<+>
Gene Symbol and Name Shh, sonic hedgehog
Chromosome 5
Gene Common Name(s) Dsh; HHG1; HLP3; HPE3; Hhg1; Hx; Hxl3; M100081; MCOPCB5; SMMCI; TPT; TPTPS; hedgehog gene 1; hemimelic extra toes; hemimelic extratoes like 3; short digits;
Molecular Note A neomycin cassette replaced exon 2 and portions of the flanking intronic sequences. [MGI Ref ID J:50050]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Shhtm1Amc, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

St-Jacques B; Dassule HR; Karavanova I; Botchkarev VA; Li J; Danielian PS; McMahon JA; Lewis PM; Paus R; McMahon AP. 1998. Sonic hedgehog signaling is essential for hair development. Curr Biol 8(19):1058-68. [PubMed: 9768360]  [MGI Ref ID J:50050]

Additional References

Chiang C; Litingtung Y; Lee E; Young KE; Corden JL; Westphal H; Beachy PA. 1996. Cyclopia and defective axial patterning in mice lacking Sonic hedgehog gene function. Nature 383(6599):407-13. [PubMed: 8837770]  [MGI Ref ID J:35802]

Fedtsova N; Perris R; Turner EE. 2003. Sonic hedgehog regulates the position of the trigeminal ganglia. Dev Biol 261(2):456-69. [PubMed: 14499653]  [MGI Ref ID J:85580]

Jaskoll T; Leo T; Witcher D; Ormestad M; Astorga J; Bringas P Jr; Carlsson P; Melnick M. 2004. Sonic hedgehog signaling plays an essential role during embryonic salivary gland epithelial branching morphogenesis. Dev Dyn 229(4):722-32. [PubMed: 15042696]  [MGI Ref ID J:89200]

Shhtm1Amc related

Ahn Y; Sanderson BW; Klein OD; Krumlauf R. 2010. Inhibition of Wnt signaling by Wise (Sostdc1) and negative feedback from Shh controls tooth number and patterning. Development 137(19):3221-31. [PubMed: 20724449]  [MGI Ref ID J:168361]

Allen BL; Song JY; Izzi L; Althaus IW; Kang JS; Charron F; Krauss RS; McMahon AP. 2011. Overlapping Roles and Collective Requirement for the Coreceptors GAS1, CDO, and BOC in SHH Pathway Function. Dev Cell 20(6):775-87. [PubMed: 21664576]  [MGI Ref ID J:173604]

Allen BL; Tenzen T; McMahon AP. 2007. The Hedgehog-binding proteins Gas1 and Cdo cooperate to positively regulate Shh signaling during mouse development. Genes Dev 21(10):1244-57. [PubMed: 17504941]  [MGI Ref ID J:121553]

Aoto K; Shikata Y; Imai H; Matsumaru D; Tokunaga T; Shioda S; Yamada G; Motoyama J. 2009. Mouse Shh is required for prechordal plate maintenance during brain and craniofacial morphogenesis. Dev Biol 327(1):106-20. [PubMed: 19103193]  [MGI Ref ID J:145732]

Bluske KK; Vue TY; Kawakami Y; Taketo MM; Yoshikawa K; Johnson JE; Nakagawa Y. 2012. beta-Catenin signaling specifies progenitor cell identity in parallel with Shh signaling in the developing mammalian thalamus. Development 139(15):2692-702. [PubMed: 22745311]  [MGI Ref ID J:185651]

Bok J; Dolson DK; Hill P; Ruther U; Epstein DJ; Wu DK. 2007. Opposing gradients of Gli repressor and activators mediate Shh signaling along the dorsoventral axis of the inner ear. Development 134(9):1713-22. [PubMed: 17395647]  [MGI Ref ID J:121232]

Bok J; Zenczak C; Hwang CH; Wu DK. 2013. Auditory ganglion source of Sonic hedgehog regulates timing of cell cycle exit and differentiation of mammalian cochlear hair cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110(34):13869-74. [PubMed: 23918393]  [MGI Ref ID J:200759]

Borello U; Cobos I; Long JE; McWhirter JR; Murre C; Rubenstein JL. 2008. FGF15 promotes neurogenesis and opposes FGF8 function during neocortical development. Neural Dev 3:17. [PubMed: 18625063]  [MGI Ref ID J:160580]

Chan JA; Balasubramanian S; Witt RM; Nazemi KJ; Choi Y; Pazyra-Murphy MF; Walsh CO; Thompson M; Segal RA. 2009. Proteoglycan interactions with Sonic Hedgehog specify mitogenic responses. Nat Neurosci 12(4):409-17. [PubMed: 19287388]  [MGI Ref ID J:150524]

Dakubo GD; Beug ST; Mazerolle CJ; Thurig S; Wang Y; Wallace VA. 2008. Control of glial precursor cell development in the mouse optic nerve by sonic hedgehog from retinal ganglion cells. Brain Res 1228:27-42. [PubMed: 18625210]  [MGI Ref ID J:139978]

Dakubo GD; Mazerolle C; Furimsky M; Yu C; St-Jacques B; McMahon AP; Wallace VA. 2008. Indian hedgehog signaling from endothelial cells is required for sclera and retinal pigment epithelium development in the mouse eye. Dev Biol 320(1):242-55. [PubMed: 18582859]  [MGI Ref ID J:139168]

Dakubo GD; Wang YP; Mazerolle C; Campsall K; McMahon AP; Wallace VA. 2003. Retinal ganglion cell-derived sonic hedgehog signaling is required for optic disc and stalk neuroepithelial cell development. Development 130(13):2967-80. [PubMed: 12756179]  [MGI Ref ID J:83530]

Dassule HR; Lewis P; Bei M; Maas R; McMahon AP. 2000. Sonic hedgehog regulates growth and morphogenesis of the tooth Development 127(22):4775-85. [PubMed: 11044393]  [MGI Ref ID J:65294]

Furimsky M; Wallace VA. 2006. Complementary Gli activity mediates early patterning of the mouse visual system. Dev Dyn 235(3):594-605. [PubMed: 16342201]  [MGI Ref ID J:106158]

Gritli-Linde A; Hallberg K; Harfe BD; Reyahi A; Kannius-Janson M; Nilsson J; Cobourne MT; Sharpe PT; McMahon AP; Linde A. 2007. Abnormal hair development and apparent follicular transformation to mammary gland in the absence of hedgehog signaling. Dev Cell 12(1):99-112. [PubMed: 17199044]  [MGI Ref ID J:117334]

Harman RM; Cowan RG; Ren Y; Quirk SM. 2011. Reduced signaling through the hedgehog pathway in the uterine stroma causes deferred implantation and embryonic loss. Reproduction 141(5):665-74. [PubMed: 21307272]  [MGI Ref ID J:180936]

Hayashi S; Lewis P; Pevny L; McMahon AP. 2002. Efficient gene modulation in mouse epiblast using a Sox2Cre transgenic mouse strain. Mech Dev 119 Suppl 1:S97-S101. [PubMed: 14516668]  [MGI Ref ID J:83040]

Hebrok M; Kim SK; St Jacques B; McMahon AP; Melton DA. 2000. Regulation of pancreas development by hedgehog signaling. Development 127(22):4905-13. [PubMed: 11044404]  [MGI Ref ID J:65293]

Jamora C; Lee P; Kocieniewski P; Azhar M; Hosokawa R; Chai Y; Fuchs E. 2005. A signaling pathway involving TGF-beta2 and snail in hair follicle morphogenesis. PLoS Biol 3(1):e11. [PubMed: 15630473]  [MGI Ref ID J:97750]

Jaskoll T; Leo T; Witcher D; Ormestad M; Astorga J; Bringas P Jr; Carlsson P; Melnick M. 2004. Sonic hedgehog signaling plays an essential role during embryonic salivary gland epithelial branching morphogenesis. Dev Dyn 229(4):722-32. [PubMed: 15042696]  [MGI Ref ID J:89200]

Jeong Y; Dolson DK; Waclaw RR; Matise MP; Sussel L; Campbell K; Kaestner KH; Epstein DJ. 2011. Spatial and temporal requirements for sonic hedgehog in the regulation of thalamic interneuron identity. Development 138(3):531-41. [PubMed: 21205797]  [MGI Ref ID J:170540]

Kim JH; Huang Z; Mo R. 2005. Gli3 null mice display glandular overgrowth of the developing stomach. Dev Dyn 234(4):984-91. [PubMed: 16247775]  [MGI Ref ID J:102853]

King P; Paul A; Laufer E. 2009. Shh signaling regulates adrenocortical development and identifies progenitors of steroidogenic lineages. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106(50):21185-90. [PubMed: 19955443]  [MGI Ref ID J:155826]

Komada M; Saitsu H; Kinboshi M; Miura T; Shiota K; Ishibashi M. 2008. Hedgehog signaling is involved in development of the neocortex. Development 135(16):2717-27. [PubMed: 18614579]  [MGI Ref ID J:138572]

Lallemand Y; Bensoussan V; Cloment CS; Robert B. 2009. Msx genes are important apoptosis effectors downstream of the Shh/Gli3 pathway in the limb. Dev Biol 331(2):189-98. [PubMed: 19422820]  [MGI Ref ID J:150759]

Lan Y; Jiang R. 2009. Sonic hedgehog signaling regulates reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions controlling palatal outgrowth. Development 136(8):1387-96. [PubMed: 19304890]  [MGI Ref ID J:147277]

Lee FY; Faivre EJ; Suzawa M; Lontok E; Ebert D; Cai F; Belsham DD; Ingraham HA. 2011. Eliminating SF-1 (NR5A1) sumoylation in vivo results in ectopic hedgehog signaling and disruption of endocrine development. Dev Cell 21(2):315-27. [PubMed: 21820362]  [MGI Ref ID J:175843]

Lewis PM; Dunn MP; McMahon JA; Logan M; Martin JF; St-Jacques B; McMahon AP. 2001. Cholesterol modification of sonic hedgehog is required for long-range signaling activity and effective modulation of signaling by Ptc1. Cell 105(5):599-612. [PubMed: 11389830]  [MGI Ref ID J:69771]

Lu QR; Yuk D; Alberta JA; Zhu Z; Pawlitzky I; Chan J; McMahon AP; Stiles CD; Rowitch DH. 2000. Sonic hedgehog--regulated oligodendrocyte lineage genes encoding bHLH proteins in the mammalian central nervous system. Neuron 25(2):317-29. [PubMed: 10719888]  [MGI Ref ID J:60773]

Machold R; Hayashi S; Rutlin M; Muzumdar MD; Nery S; Corbin JG; Gritli-Linde A; Dellovade T; Porter JA; Rubin LL; Dudek H; McMahon AP; Fishell G. 2003. Sonic hedgehog is required for progenitor cell maintenance in telencephalic stem cell niches. Neuron 39(6):937-50. [PubMed: 12971894]  [MGI Ref ID J:85603]

Mao J; McGlinn E; Huang P; Tabin CJ; McMahon AP. 2009. Fgf-dependent Etv4/5 activity is required for posterior restriction of Sonic Hedgehog and promoting outgrowth of the vertebrate limb. Dev Cell 16(4):600-6. [PubMed: 19386268]  [MGI Ref ID J:149478]

McNeill B; Perez-Iratxeta C; Mazerolle C; Furimsky M; Mishina Y; Andrade-Navarro MA; Wallace VA. 2012. Comparative genomics identification of a novel set of temporally regulated hedgehog target genes in the retina. Mol Cell Neurosci 49(3):333-40. [PubMed: 22281533]  [MGI Ref ID J:196757]

Miller LA; Wert SE; Clark JC; Xu Y; Perl AK; Whitsett JA. 2004. Role of Sonic hedgehog in patterning of tracheal-bronchial cartilage and the peripheral lung. Dev Dyn 231(1):57-71. [PubMed: 15305287]  [MGI Ref ID J:91723]

Okada T; Okumura Y; Motoyama J; Ogawa M. 2008. FGF8 signaling patterns the telencephalic midline by regulating putative key factors of midline development. Dev Biol 320(1):92-101. [PubMed: 18547559]  [MGI Ref ID J:139160]

Park J; Zhang JJ; Moro A; Kushida M; Wegner M; Kim PC. 2010. Regulation of Sox9 by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is essential for patterning and formation of tracheal cartilage. Dev Dyn 239(2):514-26. [PubMed: 20034104]  [MGI Ref ID J:157005]

Passman JN; Dong XR; Wu SP; Maguire CT; Hogan KA; Bautch VL; Majesky MW. 2008. A sonic hedgehog signaling domain in the arterial adventitia supports resident Sca1+ smooth muscle progenitor cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105(27):9349-54. [PubMed: 18591670]  [MGI Ref ID J:137825]

Paul A; Laufer E. 2011. Endogenous biotin as a marker of adrenocortical cells with steroidogenic potential. Mol Cell Endocrinol 336(1-2):133-40. [PubMed: 21256921]  [MGI Ref ID J:179464]

Pepicelli CV; Lewis PM; McMahon AP. 1998. Sonic hedgehog regulates branching morphogenesis in the mammalian lung. Curr Biol 8(19):1083-6. [PubMed: 9768363]  [MGI Ref ID J:50051]

Probst S; Kraemer C; Demougin P; Sheth R; Martin GR; Shiratori H; Hamada H; Iber D; Zeller R; Zuniga A. 2011. SHH propagates distal limb bud development by enhancing CYP26B1-mediated retinoic acid clearance via AER-FGF signalling. Development 138(10):1913-23. [PubMed: 21471156]  [MGI Ref ID J:171448]

Ramalho-Santos M; Melton DA; McMahon AP. 2000. Hedgehog signals regulate multiple aspects of gastrointestinal development. Development 127(12):2763-72. [PubMed: 10821773]  [MGI Ref ID J:62158]

Rhee H; Polak L; Fuchs E. 2006. Lhx2 maintains stem cell character in hair follicles. Science 312(5782):1946-9. [PubMed: 16809539]  [MGI Ref ID J:110119]

Rice R; Spencer-Dene B; Connor EC; Gritli-Linde A; McMahon AP; Dickson C; Thesleff I; Rice DP. 2004. Disruption of Fgf10/Fgfr2b-coordinated epithelial-mesenchymal interactions causes cleft palate. J Clin Invest 113(12):1692-700. [PubMed: 15199404]  [MGI Ref ID J:90909]

Shen J; Walsh CA. 2005. Targeted disruption of tgif, the mouse ortholog of a human holoprosencephaly gene, does not result in holoprosencephaly in mice. Mol Cell Biol 25(9):3639-47. [PubMed: 15831469]  [MGI Ref ID J:97642]

Shikata Y; Okada T; Hashimoto M; Ellis T; Matsumaru D; Shiroishi T; Ogawa M; Wainwright B; Motoyama J. 2011. Ptch1-mediated dosage-dependent action of Shh signaling regulates neural progenitor development at late gestational stages. Dev Biol 349(2):147-59. [PubMed: 20969845]  [MGI Ref ID J:168035]

Takamoto N; You LR; Moses K; Chiang C; Zimmer WE; Schwartz RJ; Demayo FJ; Tsai MJ; Tsai SY. 2005. COUP-TFII is essential for radial and anteroposterior patterning of the stomach. Development 132(9):2179-89. [PubMed: 15829524]  [MGI Ref ID J:98520]

Tenzen T; Allen BL; Cole F; Kang JS; Krauss RS; McMahon AP. 2006. The cell surface membrane proteins Cdo and Boc are components and targets of the Hedgehog signaling pathway and feedback network in mice. Dev Cell 10(5):647-56. [PubMed: 16647304]  [MGI Ref ID J:108747]

Tian H; Jeong J; Harfe BD; Tabin CJ; McMahon AP. 2005. Mouse Disp1 is required in sonic hedgehog-expressing cells for paracrine activity of the cholesterol-modified ligand. Development 132(1):133-42. [PubMed: 15576405]  [MGI Ref ID J:94270]

Tian H; Tenzen T; McMahon AP. 2004. Dose dependency of Disp1 and genetic interaction between Disp1 and other hedgehog signaling components in the mouse. Development 131(16):4021-33. [PubMed: 15269168]  [MGI Ref ID J:92058]

Touahri Y; Escalas N; Benazeraf B; Cochard P; Danesin C; Soula C. 2012. Sulfatase 1 promotes the motor neuron-to-oligodendrocyte fate switch by activating Shh signaling in Olig2 progenitors of the embryonic ventral spinal cord. J Neurosci 32(50):18018-34. [PubMed: 23238718]  [MGI Ref ID J:192019]

Treier M; O'Connell S; Gleiberman A; Price J; Szeto DP; Burgess R; Chuang PT; McMahon AP; Rosenfeld MG. 2001. Hedgehog signaling is required for pituitary gland development. Development 128(3):377-86. [PubMed: 11152636]  [MGI Ref ID J:66789]

Ulloa F; Itasaki N; Briscoe J. 2007. Inhibitory Gli3 activity negatively regulates Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Curr Biol 17(6):545-50. [PubMed: 17331723]  [MGI Ref ID J:121269]

Vincent SD; Mayeuf A; Niro C; Saitou M; Buckingham M. 2012. Non Conservation of Function for the Evolutionarily Conserved Prdm1 Protein in the Control of the Slow Twitch Myogenic Program in the Mouse Embryo. Mol Biol Evol :. [PubMed: 22522309]  [MGI Ref ID J:186268]

Vue TY; Lee M; Tan YE; Werkhoven Z; Wang L; Nakagawa Y. 2013. Thalamic control of neocortical area formation in mice. J Neurosci 33(19):8442-53. [PubMed: 23658181]  [MGI Ref ID J:198431]

Wang Y; Dakubo GD; Thurig S; Mazerolle CJ; Wallace VA. 2005. Retinal ganglion cell-derived sonic hedgehog locally controls proliferation and the timing of RGC development in the embryonic mouse retina. Development 132(22):5103-13. [PubMed: 16236765]  [MGI Ref ID J:103124]

Wang YP; Dakubo G; Howley P; Campsall KD; Mazarolle CJ; Shiga SA; Lewis PM; McMahon AP; Wallace VA. 2002. Development of normal retinal organization depends on Sonic hedgehog signaling from ganglion cells. Nat Neurosci 5(9):831-2. [PubMed: 12195432]  [MGI Ref ID J:78708]

Yu J; Carroll TJ; McMahon AP. 2002. Sonic hedgehog regulates proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal cells in the mouse metanephric kidney. Development 129(22):5301-12. [PubMed: 12399320]  [MGI Ref ID J:79481]

Zhang XM; Ramalho-Santos M; McMahon AP. 2001. Smoothened mutants reveal redundant roles for Shh and Ihh signaling including regulation of L/R symmetry by the mouse node. Cell 106(2):781-92. [PubMed: 11517919]  [MGI Ref ID J:175111]

Zuniga A; Laurent F; Lopez-Rios J; Klasen C; Matt N; Zeller R. 2012. Conserved cis-regulatory regions in a large genomic landscape control SHH and BMP-regulated Gremlin1 expression in mouse limb buds. BMC Dev Biol 12(1):23. [PubMed: 22888807]  [MGI Ref ID J:187726]

Health & husbandry

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Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Pricing and Purchasing

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Cryorecovery* $2450.00
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At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

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    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 11 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice
    Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3185.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.
    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 11 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice
    Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

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