Strain Name:

B6.129S2-Mapk9tm1Flv/J

Stock Number:

004321

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Availability:

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Th1 cell differentiation is impaired in these mice. Primary murine embryonic fibroblasts prepared from mutant embryos have decreased viability and increased genomic DNA fragmentation with UV irradiation. This mutant mouse strain represents a model that may be useful in studies related to signal transduction.

Description

Strain Information

Former Names B6.129-Mapk9tm1Flv/J    (Changed: 20-DEC-06 )
Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
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Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Mating SystemHomozygote x Homozygote         (Female x Male)   01-MAR-06
Specieslaboratory mouse
GenerationN5+N1F1 (11-APR-11)
Generation Definitions
 
Donating InvestigatorDr. Richard A. Flavell,   Yale University School of Medicine

Description
Mice that are homozygous for the targeted mutation are viable, normal in size and do not display any gross physical or behavioral abnormalities. No gene product, mRNA or protein, is detected. Mutant mice have normal T cell and B cell development, ratio of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the spleen, and numbers of peripheral B cells. Although differentiation of precursor CD4+ T cells into effector Th2 cells is normal, Th1 cell differentiation is impaired. Treatment with IFN-gamma and IL-12 during precursor CD4+ T cell differentiation results in normal Th1 cell development. Primary murine embryonic fibroblasts prepared from mutant embryos have decreased viability and increased genomic DNA fragmentation with UV irradiation. This mutant mouse strain represents a model that may be useful in studies related to signal transduction.

Development
A targeting vector containing neomycin resistance and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase genes was used to disrupt three exons encoding the protein subdomains VIII and IX (amino acids residues 151-229). The construct was electroporated into 129S2/SvPas derived D3M embryonic stem (ES) cells. Correctly targeted ES cells were injected into C57BL/6 blastocysts. The donating investigator reports that the resulting chimeric animals were backcrossed to C57BL/6 mice (see SNP note below).

A 32 SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) panel analysis, with 27 markers covering all 19 chromosomes and the X chromosome, as well as 5 markers that distinguish between the C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N substrains, was performed on the rederived living colony at The Jackson Laboratory Repository. While the 27 markers throughout the genome suggested a C57BL/6 genetic background, at least 2 of 5 markers that determine C57BL/6J from C57BL/6N were found to be segregating. These data suggest the mice sent to The Jackson Laboratory Repository were on a mixed C57BL/6J ; C57BL/6N genetic background.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J (approximate) A 32 SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) panel analysis, with 27 markers covering all 19 chromosomes and the X chromosome, as well as 5 markers that distinguish between the C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N substrains, was performed on the rederived living colony at The Jackson Laboratory Repository. While the 27 markers throughout the genome suggested a C57BL/6 genetic background, at least 2 of 5 markers that determine C57BL/6J from C57BL/6N were found to be segregating. These data suggest the mice sent to The Jackson Laboratory Repository were on a mixed C57BL/6J ; C57BL/6N genetic background.
   005304 C57BL/6NJ (approximate) A 32 SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) panel analysis, with 27 markers covering all 19 chromosomes and the X chromosome, as well as 5 markers that distinguish between the C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N substrains, was performed on the rederived living colony at The Jackson Laboratory Repository. While the 27 markers throughout the genome suggested a C57BL/6 genetic background, at least 2 of 5 markers that determine C57BL/6J from C57BL/6N were found to be segregating. These data suggest the mice sent to The Jackson Laboratory Repository were on a mixed C57BL/6J ; C57BL/6N genetic background.
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying other alleles of Mapk9
013538   B6.129-Mapk9tm1.1Rjd/J
013539   C.129(B6)-Mapk9tm1.1Rjd/J
View Strains carrying other alleles of Mapk9     (2 strains)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Mapk9tm1Flv/Mapk9tm1Flv

        B6.129S2-Mapk9tm1Flv
  • integument phenotype
  • abnormal keratinocyte morphology
    • exhibit greater number of keratinocyte stem cells in skin   (MGI Ref ID J:93433)
    • abnormal keratinocyte differentiation
      • keratohyalin granules, markers of epidermal differentiation, are increased in the stratum granulosum   (MGI Ref ID J:93433)
  • epidermal hyperplasia
    • keratinocyte hyperplasia, resulting in an increased number of epithelial cell layers   (MGI Ref ID J:93433)
  • thick epidermis   (MGI Ref ID J:93433)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal keratinocyte differentiation
    • keratohyalin granules, markers of epidermal differentiation, are increased in the stratum granulosum   (MGI Ref ID J:93433)

Mapk9tm1Flv/Mapk9tm1Flv

        B6.129S2-Mapk9tm1Flv/J
  • mortality/aging
  • decreased sensitivity to induced morbidity/mortality
    • mortality from galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS)-induced liver injury is markedly decreased compared to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:113452)
  • liver/biliary system phenotype
  • abnormal liver physiology
    • exhibit protection from galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS)-induced liver injury, showing decreased injury, mortality, and blockage of the TNF death pathway and mitochondrial death pathway (decrease in Bid cleavage, mitochondrial translocation, and cytochrome c release)   (MGI Ref ID J:113452)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • decreased susceptibility to injury
    • exhibit protection from GalN/LPS-induced liver injury   (MGI Ref ID J:113452)

The following phenotype information may relate to a genetic background differing from this JAX® Mice strain.

Mapk9tm1Flv/Mapk9tm1Flv

        involves: 129S2/SvPas
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • *normal* cardiovascular system phenotype
    • exhibit no difference in response to pressure overload compared to wild type exhibit no difference in response to pressure overload compared to wild-type   (MGI Ref ID J:108253)
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal T-helper 1 cell differentiation
    • exhibit impaired differentiation of precursor CD4+ T cells into effector T helper 1 cells but not T helper 2 cells   (MGI Ref ID J:50628)
    • even in the presence of IL-2, precursor CD4+ T cells fail to differentiate into Th1 cells that produce large amounts of the effector cytokine IFN-gamma   (MGI Ref ID J:50628)
    • IFN-gamma production is reduced in effector Th1 cells; impairment of IFN-gamma production in Th1 cells is caused by insufficient IL-12 stimulated differentiation of the precursor CD4+ T cells into effector Th1 cells   (MGI Ref ID J:50628)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal T-helper 1 cell differentiation
    • exhibit impaired differentiation of precursor CD4+ T cells into effector T helper 1 cells but not T helper 2 cells   (MGI Ref ID J:50628)
    • even in the presence of IL-2, precursor CD4+ T cells fail to differentiate into Th1 cells that produce large amounts of the effector cytokine IFN-gamma   (MGI Ref ID J:50628)
    • IFN-gamma production is reduced in effector Th1 cells; impairment of IFN-gamma production in Th1 cells is caused by insufficient IL-12 stimulated differentiation of the precursor CD4+ T cells into effector Th1 cells   (MGI Ref ID J:50628)

Mapk9tm1Flv/Mapk9tm1Flv

        involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal enzyme/coenzyme activity
    • upon UV irradiation, mutant MEFs (mouse embryonic fibroblasts) show decreased JNK activity compared to wild-type or Mapk8-null MEFs   (MGI Ref ID J:112737)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Mapk9tm1Flv related

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
Immunodeficiency
      specific T cell deficiency

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Mapk9tm1Flv
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Richard Flavell
Allele Type Targeted (knock-out)
Common Name(s) Jnk2 KO; Jnk2-;
Mutation Made ByDr. Richard Flavell,   Yale University School of Medicine
Strain of Origin129S2/SvPas
ES Cell Line NameD3
ES Cell Line Strain129S2/SvPas
Gene Symbol and Name Mapk9, mitogen-activated protein kinase 9
Chromosome 11
Gene Common Name(s) AI851083; JNK-55; JNK/SAPK alpha; JNK2; JNK2A; JNK2ALPHA; JNK2B; JNK2BETA; PRKM9; Prkm9; SAPK; SAPK1a; expressed sequence AI851083; p54a; p54aSAPK; protein kinase, mitogen-activated 9;
Molecular Note A neomycin selection cassette replaced a genomic fragment containing three coding exons containing sequences required for protein kinase activity. RT-PCR analysis on RNA derived from thymus of homozygous mice confirmed that no detectable transcript is produced from this allele. Western blot analysis on brain, thymocyte and T cells derived from homozygous mice confirmed that no protein was expressed from this allele. [MGI Ref ID J:50628]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Mapk9tm1Flv, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Yang DD; Conze D; Whitmarsh AJ; Barrett T; Davis RJ; Rincon M; Flavell RA. 1998. Differentiation of CD4+ T cells to Th1 cells requires MAP kinase JNK2. Immunity 9(4):575-85. [PubMed: 9806643]  [MGI Ref ID J:50628]

Additional References

Mapk9tm1Flv related

Abdelli S; Puyal J; Bielmann C; Buchillier V; Abderrahmani A; Clarke PG; Beckmann JS; Bonny C. 2009. JNK3 is abundant in insulin-secreting cells and protects against cytokine-induced apoptosis. Diabetologia 52(9):1871-80. [PubMed: 19609503]  [MGI Ref ID J:154878]

Alcorn JF; Guala AS; van der Velden J; McElhinney B; Irvin CG; Davis RJ; Janssen-Heininger YM. 2008. Jun N-terminal kinase 1 regulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition induced by TGF-beta1. J Cell Sci 121(Pt 7):1036-45. [PubMed: 18334556]  [MGI Ref ID J:138475]

Anbalagan M; Sabapathy K. 2012. JNK1 and JNK2 play redundant functions in Myc-induced B cell lymphoma formation. Int J Cancer 130(8):1967-9. [PubMed: 21630260]  [MGI Ref ID J:181076]

Barnat M; Enslen H; Propst F; Davis RJ; Soares S; Nothias F. 2010. Distinct roles of c-Jun N-terminal kinase isoforms in neurite initiation and elongation during axonal regeneration. J Neurosci 30(23):7804-16. [PubMed: 20534829]  [MGI Ref ID J:160890]

Bi X; Pohl NM; Yin Z; Yang W. 2011. Loss of JNK2 increases intestinal tumor susceptibility in Apc1638+/- mice with dietary modulation. Carcinogenesis 32(4):584-8. [PubMed: 21183606]  [MGI Ref ID J:170586]

Bonnesen B; Orskov C; Rasmussen S; Holst PJ; Christensen JP; Eriksen KW; Qvortrup K; Odum N; Labuda T. 2005. MEK kinase 1 activity is required for definitive erythropoiesis in the mouse fetal liver. Blood 106(10):3396-404. [PubMed: 16081685]  [MGI Ref ID J:124072]

Bourdi M; Korrapati MC; Chakraborty M; Yee SB; Pohl LR. 2008. Protective role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 in acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 374(1):6-10. [PubMed: 18586006]  [MGI Ref ID J:139164]

Brecht S; Kirchhof R; Chromik A; Willesen M; Nicolaus T; Raivich G; Wessig J; Waetzig V; Goetz M; Claussen M; Pearse D; Kuan CY; Vaudano E; Behrens A; Wagner E; Flavell RA; Davis RJ; Herdegen T. 2005. Specific pathophysiological functions of JNK isoforms in the brain. Eur J Neurosci 21(2):363-77. [PubMed: 15673436]  [MGI Ref ID J:100808]

Cellurale C; Girnius N; Jiang F; Cavanagh-Kyros J; Lu S; Garlick DS; Mercurio AM; Davis RJ. 2012. Role of JNK in mammary gland development and breast cancer. Cancer Res 72(2):472-81. [PubMed: 22127926]  [MGI Ref ID J:181146]

Cellurale C; Sabio G; Kennedy NJ; Das M; Barlow M; Sandy P; Jacks T; Davis RJ. 2011. Requirement of c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase for Ras-Initiated Tumor Formation. Mol Cell Biol 31(7):1565-76. [PubMed: 21282468]  [MGI Ref ID J:170101]

Cellurale C; Weston CR; Reilly J; Garlick DS; Jerry DJ; Sluss HK; Davis RJ. 2010. Role of JNK in a Trp53-dependent mouse model of breast cancer. PLoS One 5(8):. [PubMed: 20814571]  [MGI Ref ID J:163993]

Chen N; Nomura M; She QB; Ma WY; Bode AM; Wang L; Flavell RA; Dong Z. 2001. Suppression of Skin Tumorigenesis in c-Jun NH(2)-Terminal Kinase-2-Deficient Mice. Cancer Res 61(10):3908-12. [PubMed: 11358804]  [MGI Ref ID J:69188]

Choi HS; Bode AM; Shim JH; Lee SY; Dong Z. 2009. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 phosphorylates Myt1 to prevent UVA-induced skin cancer. Mol Cell Biol 29(8):2168-80. [PubMed: 19204086]  [MGI Ref ID J:147767]

Chromik AM; Muller AM; Korner J; Belyaev O; Holland-Letz T; Schmitz F; Herdegen T; Uhl W; Mittelkotter U. 2007. Genetic deletion of JNK1 and JNK2 aggravates the DSS-induced colitis in mice. J Invest Surg 20(1):23-33. [PubMed: 17365404]  [MGI Ref ID J:130576]

Conze D; Krahl T; Kennedy N; Weiss L; Lumsden J; Hess P; Flavell RA; Le Gros G; Davis RJ; Rincon M. 2002. c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK)1 and JNK2 have distinct roles in CD8(+) T cell activation. J Exp Med 195(7):811-23. [PubMed: 11927626]  [MGI Ref ID J:124416]

Das M; Garlick DS; Greiner DL; Davis RJ. 2011. The role of JNK in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Genes Dev 25(6):634-45. [PubMed: 21406557]  [MGI Ref ID J:171040]

Das M; Jiang F; Sluss HK; Zhang C; Shokat KM; Flavell RA; Davis RJ. 2007. Suppression of p53-dependent senescence by the JNK signal transduction pathway. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104(40):15759-64. [PubMed: 17893331]  [MGI Ref ID J:131766]

Das M; Sabio G; Jiang F; Rincon M; Flavell RA; Davis RJ. 2009. Induction of hepatitis by JNK-mediated expression of TNF-alpha. Cell 136(2):249-60. [PubMed: 19167327]  [MGI Ref ID J:147632]

Denninger K; Rasmussen S; Larsen JM; Orskov C; Seier Poulsen S; Sorensen P; Christensen JP; Illges H; Odum N; Labuda T. 2011. JNK1, but Not JNK2, Is Required in Two Mechanistically Distinct Models of Inflammatory Arthritis. Am J Pathol 179(4):1884-93. [PubMed: 21839715]  [MGI Ref ID J:176299]

Dong C; Yang DD; Tournier C; Whitmarsh AJ; Xu J; Davis RJ; Flavell RA. 2000. JNK is required for effector T-cell function but not for T-cell activation. Nature 405(6782):91-4. [PubMed: 10811224]  [MGI Ref ID J:61895]

Fujii N; Boppart MD; Dufresne SD; Crowley PF; Jozsi AC; Sakamoto K; Yu H; Aschenbach WG; Kim S; Miyazaki H; Rui L; White MF; Hirshman MF; Goodyear LJ. 2004. Overexpression or ablation of JNK in skeletal muscle has no effect on glycogen synthase activity. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 287(1):C200-8. [PubMed: 15013949]  [MGI Ref ID J:95346]

Gao Z; Zhang J; Kheterpal I; Kennedy N; Davis RJ; Ye J. 2011. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein degradation in response to persistent c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) activation contributes to hepatic steatosis in obesity. J Biol Chem 286(25):22227-34. [PubMed: 21540183]  [MGI Ref ID J:174806]

Heinonen KM; Vanegas JR; Lew D; Krosl J; Perreault C. 2011. Wnt4 enhances murine hematopoietic progenitor cell expansion through a planar cell polarity-like pathway. PLoS One 6(4):e19279. [PubMed: 21541287]  [MGI Ref ID J:172379]

Hubner A; Barrett T; Flavell RA; Davis RJ. 2008. Multisite phosphorylation regulates Bim stability and apoptotic activity. Mol Cell 30(4):415-25. [PubMed: 18498746]  [MGI Ref ID J:137061]

Hubner A; Mulholland DJ; Standen CL; Karasarides M; Cavanagh-Kyros J; Barrett T; Chi H; Greiner DL; Tournier C; Sawyers CL; Flavell RA; Wu H; Davis RJ. 2012. JNK and PTEN cooperatively control the development of invasive adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109(30):12046-51. [PubMed: 22753496]  [MGI Ref ID J:186492]

Hunot S; Vila M; Teismann P; Davis RJ; Hirsch EC; Przedborski S; Rakic P; Flavell RA. 2004. JNK-mediated induction of cyclooxygenase 2 is required for neurodegeneration in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101(2):665-70. [PubMed: 14704277]  [MGI Ref ID J:87428]

Ijaz A; Tejada T; Catanuto P; Xia X; Elliot SJ; Lenz O; Jauregui A; Saenz MO; Molano RD; Pileggi A; Ricordi C; Fornoni A. 2009. Inhibition of C-jun N-terminal kinase improves insulin sensitivity but worsens albuminuria in experimental diabetes. Kidney Int 75(4):381-8. [PubMed: 18971923]  [MGI Ref ID J:162711]

Jaeschke A; Karasarides M; Ventura JJ; Ehrhardt A; Zhang C; Flavell RA; Shokat KM; Davis RJ. 2006. JNK2 is a positive regulator of the cJun transcription factor. Mol Cell 23(6):899-911. [PubMed: 16973441]  [MGI Ref ID J:112737]

Jaeschke A; Rincon M; Doran B; Reilly J; Neuberg D; Greiner DL; Shultz LD; Rossini AA; Flavell RA; Davis RJ. 2005. Disruption of the Jnk2 (Mapk9) gene reduces destructive insulitis and diabetes in a mouse model of type I diabetes. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102(19):6931-5. [PubMed: 15867147]  [MGI Ref ID J:99056]

Joetham A; Ohnishi H; Okamoto M; Takeda K; Schedel M; Domenico J; Dakhama A; Gelfand EW. 2012. Loss of T regulatory cell suppression following signaling through glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis receptor (GITR) is dependent on c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation. J Biol Chem 287(21):17100-8. [PubMed: 22461627]  [MGI Ref ID J:185623]

Kelkar N; Delmotte MH; Weston CR; Barrett T; Sheppard BJ; Flavell RA; Davis RJ. 2003. Morphogenesis of the telencephalic commissure requires scaffold protein JNK-interacting protein 3 (JIP3). Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100(17):9843-8. [PubMed: 12897243]  [MGI Ref ID J:85160]

Keramaris E; Ruzhynsky VA; Callaghan SM; Wong E; Davis RJ; Flavell R; Slack RS; Park DS. 2008. Required roles of Bax and JNKs in central and peripheral nervous system death of retinoblastoma-deficient mice. J Biol Chem 283(1):405-15. [PubMed: 17984095]  [MGI Ref ID J:130256]

Keramaris E; Vanderluit JL; Bahadori M; Mousavi K; Davis RJ; Flavell R; Slack RS; Park DS. 2005. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 deficiency protects neurons from axotomy-induced death in vivo through mechanisms independent of c-Jun phosphorylation. J Biol Chem 280(2):1132-41. [PubMed: 15528206]  [MGI Ref ID J:96192]

Kim L; Del Rio L; Butcher BA; Mogensen TH; Paludan SR; Flavell RA; Denkers EY. 2005. p38 MAPK autophosphorylation drives macrophage IL-12 production during intracellular infection. J Immunol 174(7):4178-84. [PubMed: 15778378]  [MGI Ref ID J:97936]

Kodama Y; Taura K; Miura K; Schnabl B; Osawa Y; Brenner DA. 2009. Antiapoptotic effect of c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-1 through Mcl-1 stabilization in TNF-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. Gastroenterology 136(4):1423-34. [PubMed: 19249395]  [MGI Ref ID J:148191]

Kontoyiannis D; Boulougouris G; Manoloukos M; Armaka M; Apostolaki M; Pizarro T; Kotlyarov A; Forster I; Flavell R; Gaestel M; Tsichlis P; Cominelli F; Kollias G. 2002. Genetic dissection of the cellular pathways and signaling mechanisms in modeled tumor necrosis factor-induced Crohn's-like inflammatory bowel disease. J Exp Med 196(12):1563-74. [PubMed: 12486099]  [MGI Ref ID J:108572]

Kuan CY; Whitmarsh AJ; Yang DD; Liao G; Schloemer AJ; Dong C; Bao J; Banasiak KJ; Haddad GG; Flavell RA; Davis RJ; Rakic P. 2003. A critical role of neural-specific JNK3 for ischemic apoptosis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100(25):15184-9. [PubMed: 14657393]  [MGI Ref ID J:86985]

Kuan CY; Yang DD; Samanta Roy DR; Davis RJ; Rakic P; Flavell RA. 1999. The Jnk1 and Jnk2 protein kinases are required for regional specific apoptosis during early brain development. Neuron 22(4):667-76. [PubMed: 10230788]  [MGI Ref ID J:54653]

Lu L; Ma J; Wang X; Wang J; Zhang F; Yu J; He G; Xu B; Brand DD; Horwitz DA; Shi W; Zheng SG. 2010. Synergistic effect of TGF-beta superfamily members on the induction of Foxp3+ Treg. Eur J Immunol 40(1):142-52. [PubMed: 19943263]  [MGI Ref ID J:155683]

Lu L; Wang J; Zhang F; Chai Y; Brand D; Wang X; Horwitz DA; Shi W; Zheng SG. 2010. Role of SMAD and non-SMAD signals in the development of Th17 and regulatory T cells. J Immunol 184(8):4295-306. [PubMed: 20304828]  [MGI Ref ID J:159864]

Melief EJ; Miyatake M; Bruchas MR; Chavkin C. 2010. Ligand-directed c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation disrupts opioid receptor signaling. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107(25):11608-13. [PubMed: 20534436]  [MGI Ref ID J:161284]

Molinero LL; Cubre A; Mora-Solano C; Wang Y; Alegre ML. 2012. T cell receptor/CARMA1/NF-kappaB signaling controls T-helper (Th) 17 differentiation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109(45):18529-34. [PubMed: 23091043]  [MGI Ref ID J:191230]

Nagelin MH; Srinivasan S; Nadler JL; Hedrick CC. 2009. Murine 12/15-lipoxygenase regulates ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 protein degradation through p38- and JNK2-dependent pathways. J Biol Chem 284(45):31303-14. [PubMed: 19713213]  [MGI Ref ID J:156345]

Ni HM; Chen X; Ding WX; Schuchmann M; Yin XM. 2008. Differential roles of JNK in ConA/GalN and ConA-induced liver injury in mice. Am J Pathol 173(4):962-72. [PubMed: 18772342]  [MGI Ref ID J:139659]

Ni HM; Chen X; Shi YH; Liao Y; Beg AA; Fan J; Yin XM. 2009. Genetic delineation of the pathways mediated by bid and JNK in tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced liver injury in adult and embryonic mice. J Biol Chem 284(7):4373-82. [PubMed: 19060338]  [MGI Ref ID J:147600]

Nicolson K; Freland S; Weir C; Delahunt B; Flavell RA; Backstrom BT. 2002. Induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the absence of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2. Int Immunol 14(8):849-56. [PubMed: 12147621]  [MGI Ref ID J:113540]

Norseen J; Hosooka T; Hammarstedt A; Yore MM; Kant S; Aryal P; Kiernan UA; Phillips DA; Maruyama H; Kraus BJ; Usheva A; Davis RJ; Smith U; Kahn BB. 2012. Retinol-binding protein 4 inhibits insulin signaling in adipocytes by inducing proinflammatory cytokines in macrophages through a c-Jun N-terminal kinase- and toll-like receptor 4-dependent and retinol-independent mechanism. Mol Cell Biol 32(10):2010-9. [PubMed: 22431523]  [MGI Ref ID J:185736]

Osto E; Matter CM; Kouroedov A; Malinski T; Bachschmid M; Camici GG; Kilic U; Stallmach T; Boren J; Iliceto S; Luscher TF; Cosentino F. 2008. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 deficiency protects against hypercholesterolemia-induced endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Circulation 118(20):2073-80. [PubMed: 18955669]  [MGI Ref ID J:165619]

Otterbein LE; Otterbein SL; Ifedigbo E; Liu F; Morse DE; Fearns C; Ulevitch RJ; Knickelbein R; Flavell RA; Choi AM. 2003. MKK3 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway mediates carbon monoxide-induced protection against oxidant-induced lung injury. Am J Pathol 163(6):2555-63. [PubMed: 14633627]  [MGI Ref ID J:86602]

Papa S; Zazzeroni F; Fu YX; Bubici C; Alvarez K; Dean K; Christiansen PA; Anders RA; Franzoso G. 2008. Gadd45beta promotes hepatocyte survival during liver regeneration in mice by modulating JNK signaling. J Clin Invest 118(5):1911-23. [PubMed: 18382767]  [MGI Ref ID J:136146]

Pedra JH; Mattner J; Tao J; Kerfoot SM; Davis RJ; Flavell RA; Askenase PW; Yin Z; Fikrig E. 2008. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 2 inhibits gamma interferon production during Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection. Infect Immun 76(1):308-16. [PubMed: 17998313]  [MGI Ref ID J:130174]

Pelegrino FS; Pflugfelder SC; De Paiva CS. 2012. Low humidity environmental challenge causes barrier disruption and cornification of the mouse corneal epithelium via a c-jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) pathway. Exp Eye Res 94(1):150-6. [PubMed: 22166618]  [MGI Ref ID J:191525]

Reinecke K; Herdegen T; Eminel S; Aldenhoff JB; Schiffelholz T. 2013. Knockout of c-Jun N-terminal kinases 1, 2 or 3 isoforms induces behavioural changes. Behav Brain Res 245:88-95. [PubMed: 23428746]  [MGI Ref ID J:197459]

Ricci R; Sumara G; Sumara I; Rozenberg I; Kurrer M; Akhmedov A; Hersberger M; Eriksson U; Eberli FR; Becher B; Boren J; Chen M; Cybulsky MI; Moore KJ; Freeman MW; Wagner EF; Matter CM; Luscher TF. 2004. Requirement of JNK2 for scavenger receptor A-mediated foam cell formation in atherogenesis. Science 306(5701):1558-61. [PubMed: 15567863]  [MGI Ref ID J:94044]

Ries V; Silva RM; Oo TF; Cheng HC; Rzhetskaya M; Kholodilov N; Flavell RA; Kuan CY; Rakic P; Burke RE. 2008. JNK2 and JNK3 combined are essential for apoptosis in dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra, but are not required for axon degeneration. J Neurochem 107(6):1578-88. [PubMed: 19014392]  [MGI Ref ID J:144751]

Ruff CA; Staak N; Patodia S; Kaswich M; Rocha-Ferreira E; Da Costa C; Brecht S; Makwana M; Fontana X; Hristova M; Rumajogee P; Galiano M; Bohatschek M; Herdegen T; Behrens A; Raivich G. 2012. Neuronal c-Jun is required for successful axonal regeneration, but the effects of phosphorylation of its N-terminus are moderate. J Neurochem 121(4):607-18. [PubMed: 22372722]  [MGI Ref ID J:184366]

Sabio G; Cavanagh-Kyros J; Ko HJ; Jung DY; Gray S; Jun JY; Barrett T; Mora A; Kim JK; Davis RJ. 2009. Prevention of steatosis by hepatic JNK1. Cell Metab 10(6):491-8. [PubMed: 19945406]  [MGI Ref ID J:155978]

Samak G; Suzuki T; Bhargava A; Rao RK. 2010. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase-2 mediates osmotic stress-induced tight junction disruption in the intestinal epithelium. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 299(3):G572-84. [PubMed: 20595622]  [MGI Ref ID J:163330]

Sanchez-Tillo E; Comalada M; Xaus J; Farrera C; Valledor AF; Caelles C; Lloberas J; Celada A. 2007. JNK1 Is required for the induction of Mkp1 expression in macrophages during proliferation and lipopolysaccharide-dependent activation. J Biol Chem 282(17):12566-73. [PubMed: 17337450]  [MGI Ref ID J:121267]

Seimon TA; Obstfeld A; Moore KJ; Golenbock DT; Tabas I. 2006. Combinatorial pattern recognition receptor signaling alters the balance of life and death in macrophages. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103(52):19794-9. [PubMed: 17167049]  [MGI Ref ID J:118240]

Sherrin T; Blank T; Hippel C; Rayner M; Davis RJ; Todorovic C. 2010. Hippocampal c-Jun-N-terminal kinases serve as negative regulators of associative learning. J Neurosci 30(40):13348-61. [PubMed: 20926661]  [MGI Ref ID J:165097]

Tachibana H; Perrino C; Takaoka H; Davis RJ; Naga Prasad SV; Rockman HA. 2006. JNK1 is required to preserve cardiac function in the early response to pressure overload. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 343(4):1060-6. [PubMed: 16579967]  [MGI Ref ID J:108253]

Tao J; Gao Y; Li MO; He W; Chen L; Harvev B; Davis RJ; Flavell RA; Yin Z. 2007. JNK2 negatively regulates CD8(+) T cell effector function and anti-tumor immune response. Eur J Immunol 37(3):818-29. [PubMed: 17301952]  [MGI Ref ID J:118685]

Timmins JM; Ozcan L; Seimon TA; Li G; Malagelada C; Backs J; Backs T; Bassel-Duby R; Olson EN; Anderson ME; Tabas I. 2009. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II links ER stress with Fas and mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. J Clin Invest 119(10):2925-41. [PubMed: 19741297]  [MGI Ref ID J:154647]

Tournier C; Hess P; Yang DD; Xu J; Turner TK; Nimnual A; Bar-Sagi D; Jones SN; Flavell RA; Davis RJ. 2000. Requirement of JNK for stress-induced activation of the cytochrome c-mediated death pathway. Science 288(5467):870-4. [PubMed: 10797012]  [MGI Ref ID J:137332]

Vandevyver S; Dejager L; Van Bogaert T; Kleyman A; Liu Y; Tuckermann J; Libert C. 2012. Glucocorticoid receptor dimerization induces MKP1 to protect against TNF-induced inflammation. J Clin Invest 122(6):2130-40. [PubMed: 22585571]  [MGI Ref ID J:190494]

Varona-Santos JL; Pileggi A; Molano RD; Sanabria NY; Ijaz A; Atsushi M; Ichii H; Pastori RL; Inverardi L; Ricordi C; Fornoni A. 2008. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 is deleterious to the function and survival of murine pancreatic islets. Diabetologia 51(12):2271-80. [PubMed: 18853132]  [MGI Ref ID J:141417]

Vernia S; Cavanagh-Kyros J; Barrett T; Jung DY; Kim JK; Davis RJ. 2013. Diet-induced obesity mediated by the JNK/DIO2 signal transduction pathway. Genes Dev 27(21):2345-55. [PubMed: 24186979]  [MGI Ref ID J:202882]

Wang Y; Singh R; Lefkowitch JH; Rigoli RM; Czaja MJ. 2006. Tumor necrosis factor-induced toxic liver injury results from JNK2-dependent activation of caspase-8 and the mitochondrial death pathway. J Biol Chem 281(22):15258-67. [PubMed: 16571730]  [MGI Ref ID J:113452]

Weston CR; Wong A; Hall JP; Goad ME; Flavell RA; Davis RJ. 2003. JNK initiates a cytokine cascade that causes Pax2 expression and closure of the optic fissure. Genes Dev 17(10):1271-80. [PubMed: 12756228]  [MGI Ref ID J:83385]

Weston CR; Wong A; Hall JP; Goad ME; Flavell RA; Davis RJ. 2004. The c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase is essential for epidermal growth factor expression during epidermal morphogenesis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101(39):14114-9. [PubMed: 15375216]  [MGI Ref ID J:93433]

Wu HJ; Venkataraman C; Estus S; Dong C; Davis RJ; Flavell RA; Bondada S. 2001. Positive signaling through CD72 induces mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and synergizes with B cell receptor signals to induce X-linked immunodeficiency B cell proliferation. J Immunol 167(3):1263-73. [PubMed: 11466342]  [MGI Ref ID J:120492]

Xu P; Das M; Reilly J; Davis RJ. 2011. JNK regulates FoxO-dependent autophagy in neurons. Genes Dev 25(4):310-22. [PubMed: 21325132]  [MGI Ref ID J:169060]

Xu P; Davis RJ. 2010. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase is required for lineage-specific differentiation but not stem cell self-renewal. Mol Cell Biol 30(6):1329-40. [PubMed: 20065035]  [MGI Ref ID J:161736]

Yang L; Wu D; Wang X; Cederbaum AI. 2012. Cytochrome P4502E1, oxidative stress, JNK, and autophagy in acute alcohol-induced fatty liver. Free Radic Biol Med 53(5):1170-80. [PubMed: 22749809]  [MGI Ref ID J:188051]

Yang P; Zhao Z; Reece EA. 2007. Involvement of c-Jun N-terminal kinases activation in diabetic embryopathy. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 357(3):749-54. [PubMed: 17449011]  [MGI Ref ID J:121800]

Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Room Number           AX11

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryThis strain originated on a B6;129S2 background, has been backcrossed for 5 generations on the C57BL/6 background and is maintained as a homozygote. Coat color expected from breeding:Black
Mating SystemHomozygote x Homozygote         (Female x Male)   01-MAR-06
Diet Information LabDiet® 5K52/5K67

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $195.00Female or MaleHomozygous for Mapk9tm1Flv  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$390.00Homozygous for Mapk9tm1Flv x Homozygous for Mapk9tm1Flv  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1500 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for both large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current demand for each strain. If a Repository strain is not immediately available, then within 2 to 3 business days, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order along with various delivery options. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age and will not exceed 12 weeks of age on the day of shipping. We will note and try to accommodate requests for specific ages of Repository strains but cannot guarantee provision of these strains at specific ages. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, please let us know.

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $253.50Female or MaleHomozygous for Mapk9tm1Flv  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$507.00Homozygous for Mapk9tm1Flv x Homozygous for Mapk9tm1Flv  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1500 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for both large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current demand for each strain. If a Repository strain is not immediately available, then within 2 to 3 business days, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order along with various delivery options. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age and will not exceed 12 weeks of age on the day of shipping. We will note and try to accommodate requests for specific ages of Repository strains but cannot guarantee provision of these strains at specific ages. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, please let us know.

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1500 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for both large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current demand for each strain. If a Repository strain is not immediately available, then within 2 to 3 business days, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order along with various delivery options. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age and will not exceed 12 weeks of age on the day of shipping. We will note and try to accommodate requests for specific ages of Repository strains but cannot guarantee provision of these strains at specific ages. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, please let us know.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J (approximate) A 32 SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) panel analysis, with 27 markers covering all 19 chromosomes and the X chromosome, as well as 5 markers that distinguish between the C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N substrains, was performed on the rederived living colony at The Jackson Laboratory Repository. While the 27 markers throughout the genome suggested a C57BL/6 genetic background, at least 2 of 5 markers that determine C57BL/6J from C57BL/6N were found to be segregating. These data suggest the mice sent to The Jackson Laboratory Repository were on a mixed C57BL/6J ; C57BL/6N genetic background.
   005304 C57BL/6NJ (approximate) A 32 SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) panel analysis, with 27 markers covering all 19 chromosomes and the X chromosome, as well as 5 markers that distinguish between the C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N substrains, was performed on the rederived living colony at The Jackson Laboratory Repository. While the 27 markers throughout the genome suggested a C57BL/6 genetic background, at least 2 of 5 markers that determine C57BL/6J from C57BL/6N were found to be segregating. These data suggest the mice sent to The Jackson Laboratory Repository were on a mixed C57BL/6J ; C57BL/6N genetic background.
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

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The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
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Terms of Use

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General Terms and Conditions


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JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

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In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

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The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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