Strain Name:

B6.129P2-Esr2tm1Unc/J

Stock Number:

004745

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Homozygous females for this knockout mutation are subfertile, producing fewer and smaller litters than wildtype controls. Decreased numbers of oocytes are also produced in response to superovulation compared to wildtype controls. Male homozygotes are fertile and exhibit epithelial hyperplasia in the bladder wall and prostatic collecting ducts. This mutant mouse strain may be useful in studies related to discerning the physiological roles of the estrogen signaling system.

Description

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
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Mating SystemHeterozygote x Homozygote         (Female x Male)   01-MAR-06
Specieslaboratory mouse
GenerationN8(Tac)N1F4 (21-MAR-11)
Generation Definitions
 
Donating Investigator Kenneth Korach,   LRDT, NIEHS, NIH

Description
Mice that are homozygous for this targeted allele are viable, normal in size and do not display any gross physical abnormalities. Stop codons inserted into exon 3 result in the production of truncated transcripts that are unlikely to be translated into a functional protein. Immunostaining of ovary tissue derived from homozygous females fails to detect protein product. Homozygous females are subfertile, producing fewer and smaller litters than wildtype controls. Decreased numbers of oocytes are also produced in response to superovulation (6 compared to 33.7 in wildtype controls). Male homozygotes are fertile and present no marked abnormalities other than epithelial hyperplasia in the bladder wall and prostatic collecting ducts. This mutant mouse strain may be useful in studies related to discerning the physiological roles of the estrogen signaling system.

Development
A targeting vector containing a neomycin resistance gene driven by the mouse phosphoglycerate kinase promoter was used to introduce stop codons into exon 3. The construct was introduced into 129P2/OlaHsd-derived E14TG2a embryonic stem (ES) cells (BK4 subline). Correctly targeted ES cells were injected into C57BL/6J blastocysts to obtain chimeric animals. These mice were then backcrossed to C57BL/6J for eight generations. In September 2001, the line was transferred to Taconic from the NIEHS and bred to C57BL/6NTac from which homozygotes were generated.

A 32 SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) panel analysis, with 27 markers covering all 19 chromosomes and the X chromosome, as well as 5 markers that distinguish between the C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N substrains, was performed on the rederived living colony at The Jackson Laboratory Repository. While the 27 markers throughout the genome suggested a C57BL/6 genetic background, 2 of 5 markers that determine C57BL/6J from C57BL/6N were found to be segregating. These data suggest the mice sent to The Jackson Laboratory Repository were on a mixed C57BL/6J ; C57BL/6N genetic background.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J (approximate)
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Esr2tm1Unc/Esr2tm1Unc

        B6.129P2-Esr2tm1Unc
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal nociception after inflammation
    • female mice exhibit an increased threshold to mechanical nociception following inflammation compared with similarly treated wild-type female mice   (MGI Ref ID J:151022)
    • however, male mice exhibit normal mechanical nociception after inflammation   (MGI Ref ID J:151022)
  • decreased exploration in new environment
    • in an elevated plus maze, mice spend less time exploring the open arms compared with wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:101943)
  • hyporesponsive to tactile stimuli
    • female mice exhibit an increased threshold to mechanical nociception compared with similarly treated wild-type female mice   (MGI Ref ID J:151022)
    • however, male mice exhibit normal mechanical nociception   (MGI Ref ID J:151022)
  • increased anxiety-related response
    • in an elevated plus maze, mice spend less time exploring the open arms compared with wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:101943)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • decreased dopamine level
    • in the caudate putamen   (MGI Ref ID J:101943)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal serotonin level
    • serotonin levels are decreased in the stria terminalis, preoptic area, and hippocampus compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:101943)
  • decreased dopamine level
    • in the caudate putamen   (MGI Ref ID J:101943)
  • integument phenotype
  • abnormal nociception after inflammation
    • female mice exhibit an increased threshold to mechanical nociception following inflammation compared with similarly treated wild-type female mice   (MGI Ref ID J:151022)
    • however, male mice exhibit normal mechanical nociception after inflammation   (MGI Ref ID J:151022)
  • hyporesponsive to tactile stimuli
    • female mice exhibit an increased threshold to mechanical nociception compared with similarly treated wild-type female mice   (MGI Ref ID J:151022)
    • however, male mice exhibit normal mechanical nociception   (MGI Ref ID J:151022)

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Esr2tm1Unc/Esr2tm1Unc

        involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6J
  • reproductive system phenotype
  • *normal* reproductive system phenotype
    • at 7-9 weeks of age, female homozygotes display normal mammary gland histology and appear to lactate efficiently, as judged by normal nursing behavior and growth of their pups   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
    • abnormal cumulus oophorus
      • upon superovulation, immature (25-31 days) female homozygotes display a reduction in the cellular mass of the oocyte cumulus relative to wild-type and heterozygous littermates   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
    • anovulation
      • upon superovulation, 2 of 11 immature (25-31 days) female homozygotes yield no detectable ova   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
    • decreased corpora lutea number
      • at 7-9 weeks of age, young adult female homozygotes display ovaries with less corpora lutea relative to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
      • upon superovulation, ovaries from immature (25-31 days) female homozygotes display fewer corpora lutea than ovaries from stimulated wild-type females   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
    • decreased litter size
      • female homozygotes show a significantly reduced litter size relative to wild-type females (3.1 1.8 vs 8.8 2.5 pups/litter, respectively)   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
    • decreased ovulation rate
      • upon superovulation, immature (25-31 days) female homozygotes display an average yield of 6.0 1.5 oocytes per female, whereas wild-type and heterozygous females yield 33.7 4.8 and 52.5 5.7 oocytes per female, respectively   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
      • ovaries from superovulated immature female homozygotes display a large number of mature oocytes, indicating a normal response to pregnant mare serum gonadotropin, but contain less corpora lutea than stimulated wild-type ovaries, suggesting that some follicles fail to fully respond and discharge their oocytes in response to hCG   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
    • impaired ovarian folliculogenesis
      • at 7-9 weeks of age, young adult female homozygotes display ovaries with more early atretic follicles and fewer corpora lutea relative to wild-type mice, suggesting partial arrest of follicular development and less frequent follicular maturation   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
    • prostate gland epithelial hyperplasia
      • at >3 months of age, male homozygotes exhibit epithelial hyperplasia in the prostatic collecting ducts   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
    • reduced female fertility
      • female homozygotes show normal sexual behavior but produce significantly fewer litters than wild-type females (1.7 1.0 vs 2.8 0.4 litters/female, respectively)   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
      • in contrast, young, sexually mature male homozygotes reproduce normally   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal astrocyte morphology
    • at 2 months of age, male homozygotes display hypertrophic astroglial cells, with swollen cell bodies and thicker processes relative to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
    • at 2 months of age, an increase in the number of hypertrophic astrocytes is also observed in the white matter adjacent to regions of neuronal loss   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
    • at 1 year of age, both male and female homozygotes show a mild to moderate increase in the number of astrocytes relative to wild-type counterparts; however, no significant differences in the number or morphology of GFAP immunoreactive cells are observed at 2 years of age   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
    • astrocytosis
      • at 2 months of age, male homozygotes show an increased number of GFAP-immunoreactive cells throughout many brain areas, esp. in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, and amygdala; females are less affected than males   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
      • only a mild increase of GFAP immunoreactivity is detected in the hippocampus and cerebellum   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
      • strikingly, no astrogliosis is observed in regions of the somatosensory cortex with severe neuronal loss   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
  • abnormal cochlear IHC afferent innervation pattern
    • at 2-6 months of age, female homozygotes exhibit some dilated afferent nerve endings on the cochlear IHCs, in the absence of a swollen stria vascularis   (MGI Ref ID J:108892)
    • however, middle and inner ear morphology is relatively normal relative to heterozygotes, and positive estrogen receptor alpha immunostaining is noted at the same locations as in control CBA/Ca mice   (MGI Ref ID J:108892)
  • abnormal neocortex morphology
    • at 2 months of age, homozygotes display hypocellularity of the neocortex, with severe neuronal deficit in layers II, III, IV and V, extending from the somatosensory region to the parietal region   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
  • abnormal somatosensory cortex morphology
    • at 2 months of age, homozygotes display a significant reduction in the number of neurons in layer II, III, IV, and V of the somatosensory cortex   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
    • by 2 years of age, an obvious atrophy affecting all layers is noted in the somatosensory-parietal cortex; however, thinning of layers IV and V is particularly pronounced   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
  • abnormal substantia nigra morphology
    • by 2 yrs of age, homozygotes exhibit severe degeneration of neuronal cell bodies in the substantia nigra   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
  • decreased brain size
    • at 2 years of age, mutant brains are significantly smaller than wild-type, exhibiting obvious atrophy in the somatosensory-parietal cortex   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
    • however, no differences in overall brain size are observed at 2 months or at 1 year of age   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
  • decreased neuron number
    • at 2 months of age, homozygotes display a severe neuronal deficit in layers II, III, IV and V of the neocortex, as well as significant neuronal loss in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, amygdala, ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra, central gray, dorsal raphe nucleus, locus coeruleus, solitary tract nucleus, medial preoptic area, and medial amygdala nucleus   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
    • at 2 months of age, neuronal loss is much more pronounced in male than in female homozygotes   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
    • at 1 year of age, both male and female homozygotes exhibit neuronal hypocellularity in the same brain regions, but the overall brain size is still similar to that of wild-type counterparts   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
    • at 2 years of age, homozygotes show a decreased number of small neurons in layers II, III, IV, and V of the somatosensory cortex, as well as loss of large pyramidal neurons in layer V   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
    • no obvious neuronal deficit is found in the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN), hippocampus, caudate-putamen, thalamus, or cerebellum at 2 months of age or later   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
  • neuron degeneration
    • at 2 yrs of age, homozygotes exhibit degeneration of neuronal cell bodies throughout the brain, esp. in the substantia nigra   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
    • however, no shrinkage of neuronal cell bodies is noted in mutant brains at 2 months of age   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
    • no neurofibrillary tangles or Lewy bodies are ever observed, even at 2 yrs of age   (MGI Ref ID J:67862)
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal B cell number
    • 17beta-estradiol-treated castrated mice exhibit a reduced decrease in the frequency of B cells compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:82423)
    • 17beta-estradiol-treated castrated mice fail to exhibit a decrease in newly formed B cells unlike similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:82423)
    • however, 17beta-estradiol-treated castrated mice exhibit decreases in pre-B and pro-B cells   (MGI Ref ID J:82423)
  • abnormal leukopoiesis
    • granulopoiesis is enhanced compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
    • abnormal lymphopoiesis
      • at 1.5 years, some mice exhibit lymphoid blast crisis unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
      • increased pre-B cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
      • increased pro-B cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • enlarged lymph nodes
    • by 1.5 years of age   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • enlarged spleen
    • profound by 1.5 years of age with leukocyte infiltration   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
    • spleen hyperplasia   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • increased leukocyte cell number
    • at 1.5 years, leukocyte numbers in the blood is increased 3- to 4-fold compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
    • increased granulocyte number
      • granulocyte populations in the bone marrow are increased 15% to 30% compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
      • absolute numbers of granulocytes are increased 2-fold compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
      • increased neutrophil cell number
        • in the blood at 1.5 years of age   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
    • increased monocyte cell number
      • in the blood at 1.5 years of age   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • spleen hypoplasia
    • 17beta-estradiol-treated ovariectomized mice exhibit a reduction in spleen cellularity unlike similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110416)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • abnormal vascular smooth muscle morphology
    • vascular smooth muscle cells are half normal size   (MGI Ref ID J:73898)
  • abnormal vascular smooth muscle physiology
    • absence of voltage dependent outward current   (MGI Ref ID J:73898)
    • increased vasoconstriction   (MGI Ref ID J:73898)
  • increased systemic arterial blood pressure
    • increased blood pressure in most mice at 6-7 months of age   (MGI Ref ID J:73898)
    • blood pressure remains elevated to 22 months of age   (MGI Ref ID J:73898)
    • heart rate unchanged   (MGI Ref ID J:73898)
  • skeleton phenotype
  • *normal* skeleton phenotype
    • unlike in Esr1 null mice, no defects are detected in the skeletal system   (MGI Ref ID J:62222)
    • abnormal bone mineralization
      • load-induced increase in periosteal mineralization is decreased 50% compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:91765)
    • increased compact bone area
      • load-induced increase in cortical area is reduced 2-fold compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:91765)
    • increased osteoblast cell number
      • after 10 minutes of mechanical stress, the number of osteoblast-like cells is increased more than in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:91765)
    • myelofibrosis
      • at 2 years, mice develop myelofibrosis unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • abnormal cumulus oophorus
    • upon superovulation, immature (25-31 days) female homozygotes display a reduction in the cellular mass of the oocyte cumulus relative to wild-type and heterozygous littermates   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
  • decreased corpora lutea number
    • at 7-9 weeks of age, young adult female homozygotes display ovaries with less corpora lutea relative to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
    • upon superovulation, ovaries from immature (25-31 days) female homozygotes display fewer corpora lutea than ovaries from stimulated wild-type females   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
  • impaired ovarian folliculogenesis
    • at 7-9 weeks of age, young adult female homozygotes display ovaries with more early atretic follicles and fewer corpora lutea relative to wild-type mice, suggesting partial arrest of follicular development and less frequent follicular maturation   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
  • prostate gland epithelial hyperplasia
    • at >3 months of age, male homozygotes exhibit epithelial hyperplasia in the prostatic collecting ducts   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
  • hearing/vestibular/ear phenotype
  • abnormal cochlear IHC afferent innervation pattern
    • at 2-6 months of age, female homozygotes exhibit some dilated afferent nerve endings on the cochlear IHCs, in the absence of a swollen stria vascularis   (MGI Ref ID J:108892)
    • however, middle and inner ear morphology is relatively normal relative to heterozygotes, and positive estrogen receptor alpha immunostaining is noted at the same locations as in control CBA/Ca mice   (MGI Ref ID J:108892)
  • renal/urinary system phenotype
  • abnormal urinary bladder urothelium morphology
    • at >3 months of age, male homozygotes exhibit epithelial hyperplasia in the bladder wall   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
  • muscle phenotype
  • abnormal muscle electrophysiology
    • absence of voltage dependent outward current in vascular smooth muscle cells   (MGI Ref ID J:73898)
  • abnormal vascular smooth muscle morphology
    • vascular smooth muscle cells are half normal size   (MGI Ref ID J:73898)
  • abnormal vascular smooth muscle physiology
    • absence of voltage dependent outward current   (MGI Ref ID J:73898)
    • increased vasoconstriction   (MGI Ref ID J:73898)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal B cell number
    • 17beta-estradiol-treated castrated mice exhibit a reduced decrease in the frequency of B cells compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:82423)
    • 17beta-estradiol-treated castrated mice fail to exhibit a decrease in newly formed B cells unlike similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:82423)
    • however, 17beta-estradiol-treated castrated mice exhibit decreases in pre-B and pro-B cells   (MGI Ref ID J:82423)
  • abnormal bone marrow cell number
    • 17beta-estradiol-treated castrated mice fail to exhibit a decrease in bone marrow cellularity unlike similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:82423)
    • increased bone marrow cell number
      • as early as 1 month of age   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • abnormal leukopoiesis
    • granulopoiesis is enhanced compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
    • abnormal lymphopoiesis
      • at 1.5 years, some mice exhibit lymphoid blast crisis unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
      • increased pre-B cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
      • increased pro-B cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • anemia
    • at 2 years in surviving mice   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • enlarged spleen
    • profound by 1.5 years of age with leukocyte infiltration   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
    • spleen hyperplasia   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • increased erythrocyte cell number
    • at 2 years, mice exhibit accumulation of red blood cells unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • increased leukocyte cell number
    • at 1.5 years, leukocyte numbers in the blood is increased 3- to 4-fold compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
    • increased granulocyte number
      • granulocyte populations in the bone marrow are increased 15% to 30% compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
      • absolute numbers of granulocytes are increased 2-fold compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
      • increased neutrophil cell number
        • in the blood at 1.5 years of age   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
    • increased monocyte cell number
      • in the blood at 1.5 years of age   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • increased megakaryocyte cell number
    • in the spleen and bone marrow   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • spleen hypoplasia
    • 17beta-estradiol-treated ovariectomized mice exhibit a reduction in spleen cellularity unlike similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110416)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal response/metabolism to endogenous compounds
    • 17beta-estradiol-treated ovariectomized mice fail to exhibit a reduction in the cortex area ration of the thymus, alterations in thymocyte frequencies, or reduced IGF-1 serum levels unlike similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110416)
    • 17beta-estradiol-treated ovariectomized mice exhibit a reduction in spleen cellularity unlike similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110416)
    • however, 17beta-estradiol-treated ovariectomized mice exhibit normal reduction in thymus weight and cellularity   (MGI Ref ID J:110416)
    • 17beta-estradiol-treated castrated mice fail to exhibit a decrease in bone marrow cellularity and exhibit a reduced decrease in the frequency of B cells unlike similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:82423)
    • however, 17beta-estradiol-treated castrated mice exhibit immunoglobulin switching and increased immunoglobulin levels   (MGI Ref ID J:82423)
  • increased circulating insulin-like growth factor I level
    • 17beta-estradiol-treated ovariectomized mice fail to exhibit a reduction in IGF-1 serum levels unlike similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110416)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • *normal* behavior/neurological phenotype
    • unlike mice null for Esr1, no defect in retention is detected in an inhibitory avoidance behavior assay   (MGI Ref ID J:65785)
    • abnormal sexual interaction
      • in a 90 min test with a receptive female the number of mounts is decreased; however, the ratio of mounts and intromissions to ejaculations is reduced indicating increased sexual excitement   (MGI Ref ID J:66582)
    • abnormal spatial learning
      • ovariectomized mice exhibit slower escape time from a Morris water maze compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:75472)
      • ovariectomized mice treated with 17beta-estradiol exhibit reduced escape platform learning in a Morris water maze compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:75472)
      • however, ovariectomized mice treated with 17beta-estradiol exhibit normal escape from a cued water maze   (MGI Ref ID J:75472)
    • increased aggression towards males
      • in a resident intruder assay aggressive behaviors toward the intruder male are increased in the first trial but not in subsequent trials compared to wild-type controls   (MGI Ref ID J:66582)
      • younger mice and naive (not used in sexual behavior assays) mice display increased aggression compared to wild-type controls   (MGI Ref ID J:66582)
  • liver/biliary system phenotype
  • enlarged liver
    • with leukocyte, mainly granulocytes with some B lymphocytes, infiltration   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • respiratory system phenotype
  • abnormal lung morphology
    • lungs contain leukocyte, mainly granulocytes with some B lymphocytes, macrophages and eosinophils, infiltration unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • tumorigenesis
  • increased chronic myelocytic leukemia incidence
    • mice exhibit a myeloproliferative disease with granulocytosis and massive blast cell infiltration of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic organs   (MGI Ref ID J:83617)
  • integument phenotype
  • abnormal hair cycle catagen phase
    • at P17 and P19, more hair follicles are in catagen than in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:107589)
  • accelerated hair follicle regression
    • apoptosis of hair follicle and hair matrix keratinocyte is increased compared to in wild-type mice confirming accelerated apoptosis-driven hair follicle regression   (MGI Ref ID J:107589)
  • increased keratinocyte apoptosis
    • in hair matrix keratinocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:107589)
  • thin epidermis
    • dermal thickness is less than in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:107589)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal cumulus oophorus
    • upon superovulation, immature (25-31 days) female homozygotes display a reduction in the cellular mass of the oocyte cumulus relative to wild-type and heterozygous littermates   (MGI Ref ID J:51663)
  • increased keratinocyte apoptosis
    • in hair matrix keratinocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:107589)

Esr2tm1Unc/Esr2tm1Unc

        involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • altered response of heart to induced stress
    • female mice treated with isoproterenol prior to ischemia, exhibit less recovery of postischemic function compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:101968)
  • decreased physiological sensitivity to xenobiotic
    • female mice treated with isoproterenol prior to ischemia, exhibit less recovery of postischemic function, phosphocreatine, and ATP compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:101968)
  • increased circulating luteinizing hormone level
    • higher than normal luteinizing hormone levels are further elevated by ovariectomy   (MGI Ref ID J:118736)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • altered response of heart to induced stress
    • female mice treated with isoproterenol prior to ischemia, exhibit less recovery of postischemic function compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:101968)

Esr2tm1Unc/Esr2tm1Unc

        involves: 129P2/OlaHsd
  • mortality/aging
  • increased sensitivity to induced morbidity/mortality
    • following induced myocardial infarction   (MGI Ref ID J:108991)
  • reproductive system phenotype
  • abnormal mammary gland growth during pregnancy
    • mid-pregnancy lobuloalveolar development is not as extensive as in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:125583)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • abnormal myocardial fiber morphology
    • after 8 months, the distance between myocytes is increased compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:93438)
    • myofibrils exhibit irregular orientation and heterogeneous length unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:93438)
    • cardiomyocytes contain abnormal nuclear envelops   (MGI Ref ID J:93438)
    • abnormal intercalated disc morphology
      • intercalating disks are more convoluted than in wild-type hearts with greater membrane lengths   (MGI Ref ID J:93438)
    • enlarged myocardial fiber
      • after 8 months, the diameter of myocytes is increased compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:93438)
  • altered response to myocardial infarction
    • following induced myocardial infarction, mice exhibit increased body weight and mortality, pleural effusions, and ascites compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:108991)
    • however, infarct size is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:108991)
  • dilated heart ventricle
    • after 8 months   (MGI Ref ID J:93438)
  • enlarged heart
    • after 8 months   (MGI Ref ID J:93438)
    • cardiac hypertrophy
      • after 8 months, mice exhibit ventricular hypertrophy compared with wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:93438)
    • increased heart weight
      • in sham-operated mice   (MGI Ref ID J:108991)
  • increased vasodilation
    • 17beta-estradiol-induced relaxation of aortic rings is more pronounced than in similarly treated wild-type rings   (MGI Ref ID J:64165)
  • digestive/alimentary phenotype
  • abnormal enterocyte morphology
    • colonic epithelium cells exhibit abnormal tight junctions and desmosomes compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
    • colonic epithelial cells exhibit reduced expression of differentiation markers compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
  • abnormal enterocyte physiology
    • colonic cells exhibit increased migration to the luminal surface compared with wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
    • abnormal enterocyte apoptosis
      • a few apoptotic cells are found in the colonic epithelium compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
    • abnormal enterocyte proliferation
      • colonic cells exhibit a 1.6-fold higher than in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
  • abnormal large intestine crypts of Lieberkuhn morphology
    • in the distal colon, mucin appears as large globs in the upper crypts and on top of the crypts unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
    • however, mice exhibit normal crypt length, crypt area, nuclear density, number of cells per crypt, and occurrence of aberrant crypt foci   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
  • colitis
    • at 4 months, mice exhibit lymphoid infiltration below the epithelium in the colon unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
    • however, lymphoid infiltration at 12 months is less severe   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal response/metabolism to endogenous compounds
    • 17beta-estradiol-induced relaxation of aortic rings is more pronounced than in similarly treated wild-type rings   (MGI Ref ID J:64165)
  • altered response to myocardial infarction
    • following induced myocardial infarction, mice exhibit increased body weight and mortality, pleural effusions, and ascites compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:108991)
    • however, infarct size is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:108991)
  • ascites
    • following induced myocardial infarction   (MGI Ref ID J:108991)
  • decreased circulating glucose level
    • in fasting mice prior to and after tamoxifen treatment   (MGI Ref ID J:151012)
  • decreased insulin secretion
    • following glucose stimulation, peak insulin secretion is delayed compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:151012)
  • increased circulating glucose level
  • increased insulin sensitivity   (MGI Ref ID J:151012)
  • increased urine glycosaminoglycan level
    • female mice exhibit an increase in urinary glycosaminoglycan content compared with wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:122274)
    • however, male mice have normal urine glycosaminoglycan content   (MGI Ref ID J:122274)
  • respiratory system phenotype
  • abnormal pulmonary alveolus morphology
    • female, but not male, 3 month old mice exhibit larger and fewer alveoli compared with wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:89974)
    • female mice exhibit an accumulation of surfactant inside the alveolar spaces unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:89974)
    • however, lung alveoli morphology is normal at P14 and 4 weeks   (MGI Ref ID J:89974)
  • abnormal surfactant physiology
    • female mice exhibit an accumulation of surfactant inside the alveolar spaces unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:89974)
  • muscle phenotype
  • abnormal muscle contractility
    • during fatiguing stimulation, male mice exhibit less of a decrease in force compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:95398)
    • during recovery from fatiguing stimulation, male mice exhibit higher force generation than similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:95398)
  • abnormal myocardial fiber morphology
    • after 8 months, the distance between myocytes is increased compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:93438)
    • myofibrils exhibit irregular orientation and heterogeneous length unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:93438)
    • cardiomyocytes contain abnormal nuclear envelops   (MGI Ref ID J:93438)
    • abnormal intercalated disc morphology
      • intercalating disks are more convoluted than in wild-type hearts with greater membrane lengths   (MGI Ref ID J:93438)
    • enlarged myocardial fiber
      • after 8 months, the diameter of myocytes is increased compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:93438)
  • increased vasodilation
    • 17beta-estradiol-induced relaxation of aortic rings is more pronounced than in similarly treated wild-type rings   (MGI Ref ID J:64165)
  • renal/urinary system phenotype
  • abnormal urinary bladder morphology
    • at 8 months, female mice exhibit epithelial atrophy, massive ulceration of the bladder, and invasion of immune cells into the stroma and epithelium unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:122274)
    • however, bladders of male mice are normal   (MGI Ref ID J:122274)
    • abnormal urinary bladder urothelium morphology
      • female mice exhibit ulceration and atrophy of bladder urothelium unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:122274)
  • abnormal urinary bladder physiology
    • bladder permeability in female mice is higher than in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:122274)
    • urinary bladder inflammation
      • female mice exhibit an increase in T cell and macrophage infiltration in the female bladders unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:122274)
  • increased urine glycosaminoglycan level
    • female mice exhibit an increase in urinary glycosaminoglycan content compared with wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:122274)
    • however, male mice have normal urine glycosaminoglycan content   (MGI Ref ID J:122274)
  • limbs/digits/tail phenotype
  • long femur
    • at 2 and 4, but not 18, months   (MGI Ref ID J:111108)
  • skeleton phenotype
  • abnormal long bone epiphyseal plate morphology
    • the number of proliferative chondrocytes per column is increased while the number of hypertrophic chondrocytes per column is decreased compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:111108)
  • long femur
    • at 2 and 4, but not 18, months   (MGI Ref ID J:111108)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal behavior
    • when suspended by their tails, fasted mice exhibit tremulousness, disturbed gait and balance, and spinning movement unlike similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:151012)
    • impaired contextual conditioning behavior
      • during fear conditioning, mice exhibit an impairment in memory for context compared with wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115451)
    • impaired cued conditioning behavior
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal excitatory postsynaptic potential
    • female mice exhibit poorer fast synaptic transmission compared with wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115451)
  • reduced long term potentiation
    • in female mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115451)
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • abnormal large intestine crypts of Lieberkuhn morphology
    • in the distal colon, mucin appears as large globs in the upper crypts and on top of the crypts unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
    • however, mice exhibit normal crypt length, crypt area, nuclear density, number of cells per crypt, and occurrence of aberrant crypt foci   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
  • abnormal mammary gland epithelium morphology
    • at day 6 of lactation, mammary gland exhibits increased visible adipose tissue and reduced epithelium compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:125583)
  • abnormal mammary gland growth during lactation
    • on day 6 of lactation, lobuloalveolar development only partially penetrates the fat pad and the alveoli are enlarged unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:125583)
  • abnormal mammary gland growth during pregnancy
    • mid-pregnancy lobuloalveolar development is not as extensive as in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:125583)
  • decreased insulin secretion
    • following glucose stimulation, peak insulin secretion is delayed compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:151012)
  • enlarged pancreatic islets
    • the average islet area is larger than in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:151012)
    • mice exhibit a reduction in the percent of small islets and an increase in the percent of larger islets compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:151012)
  • mammary gland alveolar hyperplasia
    • on day 6 of lactation   (MGI Ref ID J:125583)
  • immune system phenotype
  • colitis
    • at 4 months, mice exhibit lymphoid infiltration below the epithelium in the colon unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
    • however, lymphoid infiltration at 12 months is less severe   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
  • urinary bladder inflammation
    • female mice exhibit an increase in T cell and macrophage infiltration in the female bladders unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:122274)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • increased body length
    • at 4, but not 18, months   (MGI Ref ID J:111108)
  • increased body weight
    • following induced myocardial infarction   (MGI Ref ID J:108991)
  • hearing/vestibular/ear phenotype
  • abnormal auditory brainstem response
    • following accoustic trauma, mice exhibit a greater shift in brainstem auditory evoked potential compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:135833)
  • integument phenotype
  • abnormal mammary gland epithelium morphology
    • at day 6 of lactation, mammary gland exhibits increased visible adipose tissue and reduced epithelium compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:125583)
  • abnormal mammary gland growth during lactation
    • on day 6 of lactation, lobuloalveolar development only partially penetrates the fat pad and the alveoli are enlarged unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:125583)
  • abnormal mammary gland growth during pregnancy
    • mid-pregnancy lobuloalveolar development is not as extensive as in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:125583)
  • mammary gland alveolar hyperplasia
    • on day 6 of lactation   (MGI Ref ID J:125583)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal enterocyte apoptosis
    • a few apoptotic cells are found in the colonic epithelium compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
  • abnormal enterocyte proliferation
    • colonic cells exhibit a 1.6-fold higher than in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:107308)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Esr2tm1Unc related

Endocrine Deficiency Research
Gonad Defects

Internal/Organ Research
Bladder
Prostate

Reproductive Biology Research
Endocrine Deficiencies Affecting Gonads
Fertility Defects
      females only

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Esr2tm1Unc
Allele Name targeted mutation, University of North Carolina
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Common Name(s) BERKO; BERKOChapel Hill; ERbeta-; ERbetaKO; Erb-; beta-ERKO; betaERKO;
Mutation Made By Kenneth Korach,   LRDT, NIEHS, NIH
Strain of Origin129P2/OlaHsd
ES Cell Line NameBK4
ES Cell Line Strain129P2/OlaHsd
Gene Symbol and Name Esr2, estrogen receptor 2 (beta)
Chromosome 12
Gene Common Name(s) ER beta; ER-BETA; ERbeta; ESR-BETA; ESRB; ESTRB; Erb; Erb2; Estrb; NR3A2; estrogen receptor beta; oestrogen receptor beta;
General Note ES cell line = BK4, which is derived from a subclone of E14TG2a.
Molecular Note A neomycin resistance cassette was inserted into exon 3 of the gene, introducing a stop codon and resulting in premature termination of translation of the Esr2 mRNA. Immunocytochemistry of ovary from homozygous mutant females showed no detectable Esr2 protein. [MGI Ref ID J:51663]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Esr2tm1Unc, Melt Curve Analysis
Esr2tm1Unc, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Krege JH; Hodgin JB; Couse JF; Enmark E; Warner M; Mahler JF; Sar M; Korach KS; Gustafsson JA; Smithies O. 1998. Generation and reproductive phenotypes of mice lacking estrogen receptor beta. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 95(26):15677-82. [PubMed: 9861029]  [MGI Ref ID J:51663]

Additional References

Esr2tm1Unc related

Abraham IM; Todman MG; Korach KS; Herbison AE. 2004. Critical in vivo roles for classical estrogen receptors in rapid estrogen actions on intracellular signaling in mouse brain. Endocrinology 145(7):3055-61. [PubMed: 14976146]  [MGI Ref ID J:105631]

Agmo A; Choleris E; Kavaliers M; Pfaff DW; Ogawa S. 2008. Social and sexual incentive properties of estrogen receptor alpha, estrogen receptor beta, or oxytocin knockout mice. Genes Brain Behav 7(1):70-7. [PubMed: 17504245]  [MGI Ref ID J:145605]

Al Sweidi S; Morissette M; Rouillard C; Di Paolo T. 2013. Estrogen receptors and lesion-induced response of striatal dopamine receptors. Neuroscience 236:99-109. [PubMed: 23357113]  [MGI Ref ID J:201379]

Alonso-Magdalena P; Ropero AB; Garcia-Arevalo M; Soriano S; Quesada I; Muhammed SJ; Salehi A; Gustafsson JA; Nadal A. 2013. Antidiabetic actions of an estrogen receptor beta selective agonist. Diabetes 62(6):2015-25. [PubMed: 23349481]  [MGI Ref ID J:208572]

Barros RP; Gabbi C; Morani A; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2009. Participation of ERalpha and ERbeta in glucose homeostasis in skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 297(1):E124-33. [PubMed: 19366879]  [MGI Ref ID J:151012]

Barros RP; Machado UF; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2006. Muscle GLUT4 regulation by estrogen receptors ERbeta and ERalpha. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103(5):1605-8. [PubMed: 16423895]  [MGI Ref ID J:105982]

Belcher SM; Chen Y; Yan S; Wang HS. 2012. Rapid estrogen receptor-mediated mechanisms determine the sexually dimorphic sensitivity of ventricular myocytes to 17beta-estradiol and the environmental endocrine disruptor bisphenol A. Endocrinology 153(2):712-20. [PubMed: 22166976]  [MGI Ref ID J:181733]

Borzychowski AM; Chantakru S; Minhas K; Paffaro VA; Yamada AT; He H; Korach KS; Croy BA. 2003. Functional analysis of murine uterine natural killer cells genetically devoid of oestrogen receptors. Placenta 24(4):403-11. [PubMed: 12657515]  [MGI Ref ID J:117832]

Brown CM; Mulcahey TA; Filipek NC; Wise PM. 2010. Production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines during neuroinflammation: novel roles for estrogen receptors alpha and beta. Endocrinology 151(10):4916-25. [PubMed: 20685874]  [MGI Ref ID J:165675]

Brown M; Ning J; Ferreira JA; Bogener JL; Lubahn DB. 2009. Estrogen receptor-alpha and -beta and aromatase knockout effects on lower limb muscle mass and contractile function in female mice. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 296(4):E854-61. [PubMed: 19176355]  [MGI Ref ID J:148129]

Bryzgalova G; Gao H; Ahren B; Zierath JR; Galuska D; Steiler TL; Dahlman-Wright K; Nilsson S; Gustafsson JA; Efendic S; Khan A. 2006. Evidence that oestrogen receptor-alpha plays an important role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis in mice: insulin sensitivity in the liver. Diabetologia 49(3):588-97. [PubMed: 16463047]  [MGI Ref ID J:107888]

Burns KA; Rodriguez KF; Hewitt SC; Janardhan KS; Young SL; Korach KS. 2012. Role of estrogen receptor signaling required for endometriosis-like lesion establishment in a mouse model. Endocrinology 153(8):3960-71. [PubMed: 22700766]  [MGI Ref ID J:189085]

Burns KH; Agno JE; Chen L; Haupt B; Ogbonna SC; Korach KS; Matzuk MM. 2003. Sexually dimorphic roles of steroid hormone receptor signaling in gonadal tumorigenesis. Mol Endocrinol 17(10):2039-52. [PubMed: 12855748]  [MGI Ref ID J:84989]

Carey MA; Card JW; Bradbury JA; Moorman MP; Haykal-Coates N; Gavett SH; Graves JP; Walker VR; Flake GP; Voltz JW; Zhu D; Jacobs ER; Dakhama A; Larsen GL; Loader JE; Gelfand EW; Germolec DR; Korach KS; Zeldin DC. 2007. Spontaneous airway hyperresponsiveness in estrogen receptor-alpha-deficient mice. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 175(2):126-35. [PubMed: 17095746]  [MGI Ref ID J:135930]

Carreras E; Turner S; Paharkova-Vatchkova V; Mao A; Dascher C; Kovats S. 2008. Estradiol acts directly on bone marrow myeloid progenitors to differentially regulate GM-CSF or Flt3 ligand-mediated dendritic cell differentiation. J Immunol 180(2):727-38. [PubMed: 18178810]  [MGI Ref ID J:130951]

Chagin AS; Lindberg MK; Andersson N; Moverare S; Gustafsson JA; Savendahl L; Ohlsson C. 2004. Estrogen receptor-beta inhibits skeletal growth and has the capacity to mediate growth plate fusion in female mice. J Bone Miner Res 19(1):72-7. [PubMed: 14753739]  [MGI Ref ID J:111108]

Chen L; Bi J; Nakai M; Bunick D; Couse JF; Korach KS; Nowak RA. 2010. Expression of basigin in reproductive tissues of estrogen receptor-{alpha} or -{beta} null mice. Reproduction 139(6):1057-66. [PubMed: 20388736]  [MGI Ref ID J:162946]

Cheng G; Weihua Z; Makinen S; Makela S; Saji S; Warner M; Gustafsson JA; Hovatta O. 2002. A role for the androgen receptor in follicular atresia of estrogen receptor beta knockout mouse ovary. Biol Reprod 66(1):77-84. [PubMed: 11751267]  [MGI Ref ID J:74014]

Cheng G; Weihua Z; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2004. Estrogen receptors ER alpha and ER beta in proliferation in the rodent mammary gland. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101(11):3739-46. [PubMed: 14762170]  [MGI Ref ID J:88911]

Choleris E; Gustafsson JA; Korach KS; Muglia LJ; Pfaff DW; Ogawa S. 2003. An estrogen-dependent four-gene micronet regulating social recognition: a study with oxytocin and estrogen receptor-alpha and -beta knockout mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100(10):6192-7. [PubMed: 12730370]  [MGI Ref ID J:83406]

Choleris E; Ogawa S; Kavaliers M; Gustafsson JA; Korach KS; Muglia LJ; Pfaff DW. 2006. Involvement of estrogen receptor alpha, beta and oxytocin in social discrimination: A detailed behavioral analysis with knockout female mice. Genes Brain Behav 5(7):528-39. [PubMed: 17010099]  [MGI Ref ID J:126499]

Cleveland AG; Oikarinen SI; Bynote KK; Marttinen M; Rafter JJ; Gustafsson JA; Roy SK; Pitot HC; Korach KS; Lubahn DB; Mutanen M; Gould KA. 2009. Disruption of estrogen receptor signaling enhances intestinal neoplasia in Apc(Min/+) mice. Carcinogenesis 30(9):1581-90. [PubMed: 19520794]  [MGI Ref ID J:152202]

Couse JF; Curtis Hewitt S; Korach KS. 2000. Receptor null mice reveal contrasting roles for estrogen receptor alpha and beta in reproductive tissues. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 74(5):287-96. [PubMed: 11162937]  [MGI Ref ID J:66741]

Couse JF; Hewitt SC; Bunch DO; Sar M; Walker VR; Davis BJ; Korach KS. 1999. Postnatal sex reversal of the ovaries in mice lacking estrogen receptors alpha and beta. Science 286(5448):2328-31. [PubMed: 10600740]  [MGI Ref ID J:59105]

Couse JF; Yates MM; Deroo BJ; Korach KS. 2005. Estrogen receptor-beta is critical to granulosa cell differentiation and the ovulatory response to gonadotropins. Endocrinology 146(8):3247-62. [PubMed: 15831568]  [MGI Ref ID J:129823]

Couse JF; Yates MM; Sanford R; Nyska A; Nilson JH; Korach KS. 2004. Formation of cystic ovarian follicles associated with elevated luteinizing hormone requires estrogen receptor-beta. Endocrinology 145(10):4693-702. [PubMed: 15231698]  [MGI Ref ID J:92628]

Couse JF; Yates MM; Walker VR; Korach KS. 2003. Characterization of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in estrogen receptor (ER) Null mice reveals hypergonadism and endocrine sex reversal in females lacking ERalpha but not ERbeta. Mol Endocrinol 17(6):1039-53. [PubMed: 12624116]  [MGI Ref ID J:83626]

Cruz MN; Douglas G; Gustafsson JA; Poston L; Kublickiene K. 2006. Dilatory responses to estrogenic compounds in small femoral arteries of male and female estrogen receptor-beta knockout mice. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 290(2):H823-9. [PubMed: 16183727]  [MGI Ref ID J:106720]

Day M; Sung A; Logue S; Bowlby M; Arias R. 2005. Beta estrogen receptor knockout (BERKO) mice present attenuated hippocampal CA1 long-term potentiation and related memory deficits in contextual fear conditioning. Behav Brain Res 164(1):128-31. [PubMed: 16054246]  [MGI Ref ID J:115451]

Dorling AA; Todman MG; Korach KS; Herbison AE. 2003. Critical role for estrogen receptor alpha in negative feedback regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone mRNA expression in the female mouse. Neuroendocrinology 78(4):204-9. [PubMed: 14583652]  [MGI Ref ID J:118736]

Douglas G; Cruz MN; Poston L; Gustafsson JA; Kublickiene K. 2008. Functional characterization and sex differences in small mesenteric arteries of the estrogen receptor-beta knockout mouse. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 294(1):R112-20. [PubMed: 17959706]  [MGI Ref ID J:131226]

Dupont S; Dennefeld C; Krust A; Chambon P; Mark M. 2003. Expression of Sox9 in granulosa cells lacking the estrogen receptors, ERalpha and ERbeta. Dev Dyn 226(1):103-6. [PubMed: 12508230]  [MGI Ref ID J:107788]

Elliot SJ; Berho M; Korach K; Doublier S; Lupia E; Striker GE; Karl M. 2007. Gender-specific effects of endogenous testosterone: female alpha-estrogen receptor-deficient C57Bl/6J mice develop glomerulosclerosis. Kidney Int 72(4):464-72. [PubMed: 17495854]  [MGI Ref ID J:152738]

Emmen JM; Couse JF; Elmore SA; Yates MM; Kissling GE; Korach KS. 2005. In vitro growth and ovulation of follicles from ovaries of estrogen receptor (ER){alpha} and ER{beta} null mice indicate a role for ER{beta} in follicular maturation. Endocrinology 146(6):2817-26. [PubMed: 15731357]  [MGI Ref ID J:109466]

Erlandsson MC; Jonsson CA; Islander U; Ohlsson C; Carlsten H. 2003. Oestrogen receptor specificity in oestradiol-mediated effects on B lymphopoiesis and immunoglobulin production in male mice. Immunology 108(3):346-51. [PubMed: 12603601]  [MGI Ref ID J:82423]

Erlandsson MC; Ohlsson C; Gustafsson JA; Carlsten H. 2001. Role of oestrogen receptors alpha and beta in immune organ development and in oestrogen-mediated effects on thymus. Immunology 103(1):17-25. [PubMed: 11380688]  [MGI Ref ID J:110416]

Fan X; Gabbi C; Kim HJ; Cheng G; Andersson LC; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2010. Gonadotropin-positive pituitary tumors accompanied by ovarian tumors in aging female ERbeta-/- mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107(14):6453-8. [PubMed: 20308571]  [MGI Ref ID J:159314]

Fan X; Kim HJ; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2007. Estrogen receptor beta is essential for sprouting of nociceptive primary afferents and for morphogenesis and maintenance of the dorsal horn interneurons. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104(34):13696-701. [PubMed: 17693550]  [MGI Ref ID J:124101]

Fan X; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2006. Estrogen receptor beta expression in the embryonic brain regulates development of calretinin-immunoreactive GABAergic interneurons. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103(51):19338-43. [PubMed: 17159139]  [MGI Ref ID J:118243]

Fliegner D; Schubert C; Penkalla A; Witt H; Kararigas G; Dworatzek E; Staub E; Martus P; Noppinger PR; Kintscher U; Gustafsson JA; Regitz-Zagrosek V. 2010. Female sex and estrogen receptor-{beta} attenuate cardiac remodeling and apoptosis in pressure overload. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 298(6):R1597-606. [PubMed: 20375266]  [MGI Ref ID J:160178]

Forster C; Kietz S; Hultenby K; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2004. Characterization of the ERbeta-/-mouse heart. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101(39):14234-9. [PubMed: 15375213]  [MGI Ref ID J:93438]

Forster C; Makela S; Warri A; Kietz S; Becker D; Hultenby K; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2002. Involvement of estrogen receptor beta in terminal differentiation of mammary gland epithelium. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99(24):15578-83. [PubMed: 12438700]  [MGI Ref ID J:125583]

Foryst-Ludwig A; Clemenz M; Hohmann S; Hartge M; Sprang C; Frost N; Krikov M; Bhanot S; Barros R; Morani A; Gustafsson JA; Unger T; Kintscher U. 2008. Metabolic actions of estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) are mediated by a negative cross-talk with PPARgamma. PLoS Genet 4(6):e1000108. [PubMed: 18584035]  [MGI Ref ID J:161654]

Fugger HN; Foster TC; Gustafsson J; Rissman EF. 2000. Novel effects of estradiol and estrogen receptor alpha and beta on cognitive function(1) Brain Res 883(2):258-64. [PubMed: 11074057]  [MGI Ref ID J:65785]

Gabel SA; Walker VR; London RE; Steenbergen C; Korach KS; Murphy E. 2005. Estrogen receptor beta mediates gender differences in ischemia/reperfusion injury. J Mol Cell Cardiol 38(2):289-97. [PubMed: 15698835]  [MGI Ref ID J:101968]

Garcia-Rudaz C; Dorfman M; Nagalla S; Svechnikov K; Soder O; Ojeda SR; Dissen GA. 2011. Excessive ovarian production of nerve growth factor elicits granulosa cell apoptosis by setting in motion a tumor necrosis factor alpha/stathmin-mediated death signaling pathway. Reproduction 142(2):319-31. [PubMed: 21646391]  [MGI Ref ID J:180912]

Glenmark B; Nilsson M; Gao H; Gustafsson JA; Dahlman-Wright K; Westerblad H. 2004. Difference in skeletal muscle function in males vs. females: role of estrogen receptor-beta. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 287(6):E1125-31. [PubMed: 15280152]  [MGI Ref ID J:95398]

Gould ML; Hurst PR; Nicholson HD. 2007. The effects of oestrogen receptors {alpha} and {beta} on testicular cell number and steroidogenesis in mice. Reproduction 134(2):271-9. [PubMed: 17660237]  [MGI Ref ID J:123340]

Grummer R; Hewitt SW; Traub O; Korach KS; Winterhager E. 2004. Different regulatory pathways of endometrial connexin expression: preimplantation hormonal-mediated pathway versus embryo implantation-initiated pathway. Biol Reprod 71(1):273-81. [PubMed: 15028626]  [MGI Ref ID J:108494]

Han X; Aenlle KK; Bean LA; Rani A; Semple-Rowland SL; Kumar A; Foster TC. 2013. Role of estrogen receptor alpha and beta in preserving hippocampal function during aging. J Neurosci 33(6):2671-83. [PubMed: 23392694]  [MGI Ref ID J:194268]

Hewitt SC; Korach KS. 2003. Oestrogen receptor knockout mice: roles for oestrogen receptors alpha and beta in reproductive tissues. Reproduction 125(2):143-9. [PubMed: 12578528]  [MGI Ref ID J:82473]

Hsu I; Chuang KL; Slavin S; Da J; Lim WX; Pang ST; O'Brien JH; Yeh S. 2014. Suppression of ERbeta signaling via ERbeta knockout or antagonist protects against bladder cancer development. Carcinogenesis 35(3):651-61. [PubMed: 24148819]  [MGI Ref ID J:206524]

Imamov O; Morani A; Shim GJ; Omoto Y; Thulin-Andersson C; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2004. Estrogen receptor beta regulates epithelial cellular differentiation in the mouse ventral prostate. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101(25):9375-80. [PubMed: 15187231]  [MGI Ref ID J:91449]

Imamov O; Yakimchuk K; Morani A; Schwend T; Wada-Hiraike O; Razumov S; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2007. Estrogen receptor beta-deficient female mice develop a bladder phenotype resembling human interstitial cystitis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104(23):9806-9. [PubMed: 17522255]  [MGI Ref ID J:122274]

Imwalle DB; Gustafsson JA; Rissman EF. 2005. Lack of functional estrogen receptor beta influences anxiety behavior and serotonin content in female mice. Physiol Behav 84(1):157-63. [PubMed: 15642619]  [MGI Ref ID J:101943]

Inzunza J; Morani A; Cheng G; Warner M; Hreinsson J; Gustafsson JA; Hovatta O. 2007. Ovarian wedge resection restores fertility in estrogen receptor beta knockout (ERbeta-/-) mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104(2):600-5. [PubMed: 17197418]  [MGI Ref ID J:119080]

Islander U; Erlandsson MC; Chavoshi T; Jochems C; Moverare S; Nilsson S; Ohlsson C; Gustafsson JA; Carlsten H. 2005. Estren-mediated inhibition of T lymphopoiesis is estrogen receptor-independent whereas its suppression of T cell-mediated inflammation is estrogen receptor-dependent. Clin Exp Immunol 139(2):210-5. [PubMed: 15654819]  [MGI Ref ID J:95690]

Islander U; Erlandsson MC; Hasseus B; Jonsson CA; Ohlsson C; Gustafsson JA; Dahlgren U; Carlsten H. 2003. Influence of oestrogen receptor alpha and beta on the immune system in aged female mice. Immunology 110(1):149-57. [PubMed: 12941152]  [MGI Ref ID J:113638]

James AW; Theologis AA; Brugmann SA; Xu Y; Carre AL; Leucht P; Hamilton K; Korach KS; Longaker MT. 2009. Estrogen/estrogen receptor alpha signaling in mouse posterofrontal cranial suture fusion. PLoS One 4(9):e7120. [PubMed: 19771170]  [MGI Ref ID J:153612]

Jayes FL; Burns KA; Rodriguez KF; Kissling GE; Korach KS. 2014. The naturally occurring luteinizing hormone surge is diminished in mice lacking estrogen receptor Beta in the ovary. Biol Reprod 90(2):24. [PubMed: 24337314]  [MGI Ref ID J:210351]

Jesmin S; Mowa CN; Sultana SN; Shimojo N; Togashi H; Iwashima Y; Kato N; Sato A; Sakuma I; Hiroe M; Hattori Y; Yamaguchi N; Kobayashi H. 2010. VEGF signaling is disrupted in the hearts of mice lacking estrogen receptor alpha. Eur J Pharmacol 641(2-3):168-78. [PubMed: 20639141]  [MGI Ref ID J:163279]

Kararigas G; Nguyen BT; Jarry H. 2014. Estrogen modulates cardiac growth through an estrogen receptor alpha-dependent mechanism in healthy ovariectomized mice. Mol Cell Endocrinol 382(2):909-14. [PubMed: 24275180]  [MGI Ref ID J:211889]

Karas RH; Schulten H; Pare G; Aronovitz MJ; Ohlsson C; Gustafsson JA; Mendelsohn ME. 2001. Effects of estrogen on the vascular injury response in estrogen receptor alpha, beta (double) knockout mice. Circ Res 89(6):534-9. [PubMed: 11557741]  [MGI Ref ID J:115411]

Kavaliers M; Devidze N; Choleris E; Fudge M; Gustafsson JA; Korach KS; Pfaff DW; Ogawa S. 2008. Estrogen receptors alpha and beta mediate different aspects of the facilitatory effects of female cues on male risk taking. Psychoneuroendocrinology 33(5):634-42. [PubMed: 18374493]  [MGI Ref ID J:141717]

Korach KS. 2000. Estrogen receptor knock-out mice: molecular and endocrine phenotypes J Soc Gynecol Investig 7(1 Suppl):S16-7. [PubMed: 10732323]  [MGI Ref ID J:61234]

Korach KS; Emmen JM; Walker VR; Hewitt SC; Yates M; Hall JM; Swope DL; Harrell JC; Couse JF. 2003. Update on animal models developed for analyses of estrogen receptor biological activity. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 86(3-5):387-91. [PubMed: 14623535]  [MGI Ref ID J:86741]

Korte T; Fuchs M; Arkudas A; Geertz S; Meyer R; Gardiwal A; Klein G; Niehaus M; Krust A; Chambon P; Drexler H; Fink K; Grohe C. 2005. Female mice lacking estrogen receptor beta display prolonged ventricular repolarization and reduced ventricular automaticity after myocardial infarction. Circulation 111(18):2282-90. [PubMed: 15867180]  [MGI Ref ID J:111628]

Kudwa AE; Bodo C; Gustafsson JA; Rissman EF. 2005. A previously uncharacterized role for estrogen receptor beta: defeminization of male brain and behavior. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102(12):4608-12. [PubMed: 15761056]  [MGI Ref ID J:97283]

Kudwa AE; Rissman EF. 2003. Double oestrogen receptor alpha and beta knockout mice reveal differences in neural oestrogen-mediated progestin receptor induction and female sexual behaviour. J Neuroendocrinol 15(10):978-83. [PubMed: 12969243]  [MGI Ref ID J:103568]

Kurita T; Lee K; Saunders PT; Cooke PS; Taylor JA; Lubahn DB; Zhao C; Makela S; Gustafsson JA; Dahiya R; Cunha GR. 2001. Regulation of progesterone receptors and decidualization in uterine stroma of the estrogen receptor-alpha knockout mouse. Biol Reprod 64(1):272-83. [PubMed: 11133684]  [MGI Ref ID J:68452]

Lambert KC; Curran EM; Judy BM; Lubahn DB; Estes DM. 2004. Estrogen receptor-alpha deficiency promotes increased TNF-alpha secretion and bacterial killing by murine macrophages in response to microbial stimuli in vitro. J Leukoc Biol 75(6):1166-72. [PubMed: 15020652]  [MGI Ref ID J:90478]

Lee KC; Jessop H; Suswillo R; Zaman G; Lanyon LE. 2004. The adaptive response of bone to mechanical loading in female transgenic mice is deficient in the absence of oestrogen receptor-alpha and -beta. J Endocrinol 182(2):193-201. [PubMed: 15283680]  [MGI Ref ID J:91765]

Li L; Fan X; Warner M; Xu XJ; Gustafsson JK; Wiesenfeld-Hallin Z. 2009. Ablation of estrogen receptor alpha or beta eliminates sex differences in mechanical pain threshold in normal and inflamed mice. Pain 143(1-2):37-40. [PubMed: 19285805]  [MGI Ref ID J:151022]

Liang M; Ekblad E; Gustafsson JA; Nilsson BO. 2001. Stimulation of vascular protein synthesis by activation of oestrogen receptor beta. J Endocrinol 171(3):417-23. [PubMed: 11739007]  [MGI Ref ID J:118401]

Liang M; Ekblad E; Lydrup ML; Nilsson BO. 2003. Combined lack of estrogen receptors alpha and beta affects vascular iNOS protein expression. Cell Tissue Res 313(1):63-70. [PubMed: 12827494]  [MGI Ref ID J:105095]

Lindberg MK; Alatalo SL; Halleen JM; Mohan S; Gustafsson JA JA; Ohlsson C. 2001. Estrogen receptor specificity in the regulation of the skeleton in female mice. J Endocrinol 171(2):229-36. [PubMed: 11691642]  [MGI Ref ID J:72536]

Lindberg MK; Moverare S; Skrtic S; Alatalo S; Halleen J; Mohan S; Gustafsson JA; Ohlsson C. 2002. Two different pathways for the maintenance of trabecular bone in adult male mice. J Bone Miner Res 17(4):555-62. [PubMed: 11918213]  [MGI Ref ID J:112374]

Liu F; Day M; Muniz LC; Bitran D; Arias R; Revilla-Sanchez R; Grauer S; Zhang G; Kelley C; Pulito V; Sung A; Mervis RF; Navarra R; Hirst WD; Reinhart PH; Marquis KL; Moss SJ; Pangalos MN; Brandon NJ. 2008. Activation of estrogen receptor-beta regulates hippocampal synaptic plasticity and improves memory. Nat Neurosci 11(3):334-43. [PubMed: 18297067]  [MGI Ref ID J:135696]

Liu S; Le May C; Wong WP; Ward RD; Clegg DJ; Marcelli M; Korach KS; Mauvais-Jarvis F. 2009. Importance of extranuclear estrogen receptor-alpha and membrane G protein-coupled estrogen receptor in pancreatic islet survival. Diabetes 58(10):2292-302. [PubMed: 19587358]  [MGI Ref ID J:154399]

Luksha L; Poston L; Gustafsson JA; Aghajanova L; Kublickiene K. 2005. Gender-specific alteration of adrenergic responses in small femoral arteries from estrogen receptor-beta knockout mice. Hypertension 46(5):1163-8. [PubMed: 16216990]  [MGI Ref ID J:116826]

Markiewicz M; Znoyko S; Stawski L; Ghatnekar A; Gilkeson G; Trojanowska M. 2013. A role for estrogen receptor-alpha and estrogen receptor-beta in collagen biosynthesis in mouse skin. J Invest Dermatol 133(1):120-7. [PubMed: 22895361]  [MGI Ref ID J:196488]

Martin LJ; Tremblay JJ. 2010. Nuclear receptors in leydig cell gene expression and function. Biol Reprod 83(1):3-14. [PubMed: 20375256]  [MGI Ref ID J:161974]

Massaro D; Clerch LB; Massaro GD. 2007. Estrogen receptor-alpha regulates pulmonary alveolar loss and regeneration in female mice: morphometric and gene expression studies. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 293(1):L222-8. [PubMed: 17449797]  [MGI Ref ID J:125845]

Massaro D; Massaro GD. 2006. Estrogen receptor regulation of pulmonary alveolar dimensions: alveolar sexual dimorphism in mice. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 290(5):L866-70. [PubMed: 16361355]  [MGI Ref ID J:115776]

Massaro D; Massaro GD. 2004. Estrogen regulates pulmonary alveolar formation, loss, and regeneration in mice. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 287(6):L1154-9. [PubMed: 15298854]  [MGI Ref ID J:108147]

Meltser I; Tahera Y; Simpson E; Hultcrantz M; Charitidi K; Gustafsson JA; Canlon B. 2008. Estrogen receptor beta protects against acoustic trauma in mice. J Clin Invest 118(4):1563-70. [PubMed: 18317592]  [MGI Ref ID J:135833]

Morani A; Barros RP; Imamov O; Hultenby K; Arner A; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2006. Lung dysfunction causes systemic hypoxia in estrogen receptor beta knockout (ERbeta-/-) mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103(18):7165-9. [PubMed: 16636272]  [MGI Ref ID J:109456]

Morissette M; Jourdain S; Al Sweidi S; Menniti FS; Ramirez AD; Di Paolo T. 2007. Role of estrogen receptors in neuroprotection by estradiol against MPTP toxicity. Neuropharmacology 52(7):1509-20. [PubMed: 17420033]  [MGI Ref ID J:124564]

Moverare S; Lindberg MK; Faergemann J; Gustafsson JA; Ohlsson C. 2002. Estrogen receptor alpha, but not estrogen receptor beta, is involved in the regulation of the hair follicle cycling as well as the thickness of epidermis in male mice. J Invest Dermatol 119(5):1053-8. [PubMed: 12445192]  [MGI Ref ID J:80752]

Nilsson BO; Ekblad E; Heine T; Gustafsson J. 2000. Increased magnitude of relaxation to oestrogen in aorta from oestrogen receptor beta knock-out mice. J Endocrinol 166(2):R5-9. [PubMed: 10927637]  [MGI Ref ID J:64165]

Nomura M; Akama KT; Alves SE; Korach KS; Gustafsson JA; Pfaff DW; Ogawa S. 2005. Differential distribution of estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and ER-beta in the midbrain raphe nuclei and periaqueductal gray in male mouse: Predominant role of ER-beta in midbrain serotonergic systems. Neuroscience 130(2):445-56. [PubMed: 15664701]  [MGI Ref ID J:105156]

Nomura M; Andersson S; Korach KS; Gustafsson JA; Pfaff DW; Ogawa S. 2006. Estrogen receptor-beta gene disruption potentiates estrogen-inducible aggression but not sexual behaviour in male mice. Eur J Neurosci 23(7):1860-8. [PubMed: 16623843]  [MGI Ref ID J:108066]

Ogawa S; Chan J; Chester AE; Gustafsson JA; Korach KS; Pfaff DW. 1999. Survival of reproductive behaviors in estrogen receptor beta gene-deficient (betaERKO) male and female mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96(22):12887-92. [PubMed: 10536018]  [MGI Ref ID J:120164]

Ogawa S; Chan J; Gustafsson JA; Korach KS; Pfaff DW. 2003. Estrogen increases locomotor activity in mice through estrogen receptor alpha: specificity for the type of activity. Endocrinology 144(1):230-9. [PubMed: 12488349]  [MGI Ref ID J:115540]

Ogawa S; Chester AE; Hewitt SC; Walker VR; Gustafsson JA; Smithies O; Korach KS; Pfaff DW. 2000. From the cover: abolition of male sexual behaviors in mice lacking estrogen receptors alpha and beta (alpha beta ERKO) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97(26):14737-41. [PubMed: 11114183]  [MGI Ref ID J:66582]

Ohlsson C; Hellberg N; Parini P; Vidal O; Bohlooly M; Rudling M; Lindberg MK; Warner M; Angelin B; Gustafsson JA. 2000. Obesity and disturbed lipoprotein profile in estrogen receptor-alpha-deficient male mice Biochem Biophys Res Commun 278(3):640-5. [PubMed: 11095962]  [MGI Ref ID J:66077]

Ohnemus U; Uenalan M; Conrad F; Handjiski B; Mecklenburg L; Nakamura M; Inzunza J; Gustafsson JA; Paus R. 2005. Hair cycle control by estrogens: catagen induction via estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha is checked by ER beta signaling. Endocrinology 146(3):1214-25. [PubMed: 15591132]  [MGI Ref ID J:107589]

Oikarinen SI; Cleveland AG; Cork KM; Bynote KK; Rafter JJ; Gustafsson JA; Mutanen M; Gould KA. 2009. Genetic mapping of Mom5, a novel modifier of Apc(Min)-induced intestinal tumorigenesis. Carcinogenesis 30(9):1591-6. [PubMed: 19574546]  [MGI Ref ID J:152194]

Omoto Y; Imamov O; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2005. Estrogen receptor alpha and imprinting of the neonatal mouse ventral prostate by estrogen. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102(5):1484-9. [PubMed: 15665095]  [MGI Ref ID J:96107]

Oyola MG; Portillo W; Reyna A; Foradori CD; Kudwa A; Hinds L; Handa RJ; Mani SK. 2012. Anxiolytic effects and neuroanatomical targets of estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) activation by a selective ERbeta agonist in female mice. Endocrinology 153(2):837-46. [PubMed: 22186418]  [MGI Ref ID J:181716]

Patisaul HB; Scordalakes EM; Young LJ; Rissman EF. 2003. Oxytocin, but not oxytocin receptor, is rRegulated by oestrogen receptor beta in the female mouse hypothalamus. J Neuroendocrinol 15(8):787-93. [PubMed: 12834440]  [MGI Ref ID J:103579]

Patrone C; Cassel TN; Pettersson K; Piao YS; Cheng G; Ciana P; Maggi A; Warner M; Gustafsson JA; Nord M. 2003. Regulation of postnatal lung development and homeostasis by estrogen receptor beta. Mol Cell Biol 23(23):8542-52. [PubMed: 14612399]  [MGI Ref ID J:89974]

Pedram A; Razandi M; O'Mahony F; Lubahn D; Levin ER. 2010. Estrogen receptor-beta prevents cardiac fibrosis. Mol Endocrinol 24(11):2152-65. [PubMed: 20810711]  [MGI Ref ID J:182828]

Pelzer T; Loza PA; Hu K; Bayer B; Dienesch C; Calvillo L; Couse JF; Korach KS; Neyses L; Ertl G. 2005. Increased mortality and aggravation of heart failure in estrogen receptor-beta knockout mice after myocardial infarction. Circulation 111(12):1492-8. [PubMed: 15781739]  [MGI Ref ID J:108991]

Polanczyk M; Yellayi S; Zamora A; Subramanian S; Tovey M; Vandenbark AA; Offner H; Zachary JF; Fillmore PD; Blankenhorn EP; Gustafsson JA; Teuscher C. 2004. Estrogen receptor-1 (Esr1) and -2 (Esr2) regulate the severity of clinical experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in male mice. Am J Pathol 164(6):1915-24. [PubMed: 15161628]  [MGI Ref ID J:91109]

Polanczyk MJ; Hopke C; Vandenbark AA; Offner H. 2007. Treg suppressive activity involves estrogen-dependent expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1). Int Immunol 19(3):337-43. [PubMed: 17267414]  [MGI Ref ID J:118673]

Prins GS; Birch L; Couse JF; Choi I; Katzenellenbogen B; Korach KS. 2001. Estrogen imprinting of the developing prostate gland is mediated through stromal estrogen receptor alpha: studies with alphaERKO and betaERKO mice. Cancer Res 61(16):6089-97. [PubMed: 11507058]  [MGI Ref ID J:71197]

Reeve VE; Allanson M; Cho JL; Arun SJ; Domanski D. 2009. Interdependence between heme oxygenase-1 induction and estrogen-receptor-beta signaling mediates photoimmune protection by UVA radiation in mice. J Invest Dermatol 129(11):2702-10. [PubMed: 19474803]  [MGI Ref ID J:157138]

Risbridger G; Wang H; Young P; Kurita T; Wang YZ; Lubahn D; Gustafsson JA; Cunha G. 2001. Evidence that epithelial and mesenchymal estrogen receptor-alpha mediates effects of estrogen on prostatic epithelium. Dev Biol 229(2):432-42. [PubMed: 11150243]  [MGI Ref ID J:110625]

Rissman EF; Heck AL; Leonard JE; Shupnik MA; Gustafsson JA. 2002. Disruption of estrogen receptor beta gene impairs spatial learning in female mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99(6):3996-4001. [PubMed: 11891272]  [MGI Ref ID J:75472]

Rocha BA; Fleischer R; Schaeffer JM; Rohrer SP; Hickey GJ. 2005. 17 Beta-estradiol-induced antidepressant-like effect in the forced swim test is absent in estrogen receptor-beta knockout (BERKO) mice. Psychopharmacology (Berl) 179(3):637-43. [PubMed: 15645223]  [MGI Ref ID J:114267]

Rosenfeld CS; Cooke PS; Welsh TH Jr; Simmer G; Hufford MG; Gustafsson JA; Hess RA; Lubahn DB. 2000. The differential fate of mesonephric tubular-derived efferent ductules in estrogen receptor-alpha knockout versus wild-type female mice. Endocrinology 141(10):3792-8. [PubMed: 11014235]  [MGI Ref ID J:108807]

Saijo K; Collier JG; Li AC; Katzenellenbogen JA; Glass CK. 2011. An ADIOL-ERbeta-CtBP transrepression pathway negatively regulates microglia-mediated inflammation. Cell 145(4):584-95. [PubMed: 21565615]  [MGI Ref ID J:173244]

Saleiro D; Murillo G; Benya RV; Bissonnette M; Hart J; Mehta RG. 2012. Estrogen receptor-beta protects against colitis-associated neoplasia in mice. Int J Cancer 131(11):2553-61. [PubMed: 22488198]  [MGI Ref ID J:187858]

Sato T; Matsumoto T; Kawano H; Watanabe T; Uematsu Y; Sekine K; Fukuda T; Aihara K; Krust A; Yamada T; Nakamichi Y; Yamamoto Y; Nakamura T; Yoshimura K; Yoshizawa T; Metzger D; Chambon P; Kato S. 2004. Brain masculinization requires androgen receptor function. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101(6):1673-8. [PubMed: 14747651]  [MGI Ref ID J:88153]

Savolainen S; Santti R; Streng T; Gustafsson JA; Harkonen P; Makela S. 2005. Sex specific expression of progesterone receptor in mouse lower urinary tract. Mol Cell Endocrinol 230(1-2):17-21. [PubMed: 15664447]  [MGI Ref ID J:104822]

Shim GJ; Wang L; Andersson S; Nagy N; Kis LL; Zhang Q; Makela S; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2003. Disruption of the estrogen receptor beta gene in mice causes myeloproliferative disease resembling chronic myeloid leukemia with lymphoid blast crisis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100(11):6694-9. [PubMed: 12740446]  [MGI Ref ID J:83617]

Skavdahl M; Steenbergen C; Clark J; Myers P; Demianenko T; Mao L; Rockman HA; Korach KS; Murphy E. 2005. Estrogen receptor-beta mediates male-female differences in the development of pressure overload hypertrophy. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 288(2):H469-76. [PubMed: 15374829]  [MGI Ref ID J:96155]

Slusarz A; Jackson GA; Day JK; Shenouda NS; Bogener JL; Browning JD; Fritsche KL; MacDonald RS; Besch-Williford CL; Lubahn DB. 2012. Aggressive prostate cancer is prevented in ERalphaKO mice and stimulated in ERbetaKO TRAMP mice. Endocrinology 153(9):4160-70. [PubMed: 22753646]  [MGI Ref ID J:189182]

Soriano S; Ropero AB; Alonso-Magdalena P; Ripoll C; Quesada I; Gassner B; Kuhn M; Gustafsson JA; Nadal A. 2009. Rapid regulation of K(ATP) channel activity by 17{beta}-estradiol in pancreatic {beta}-cells involves the estrogen receptor {beta} and the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor. Mol Endocrinol 23(12):1973-82. [PubMed: 19855088]  [MGI Ref ID J:154658]

Spencer-Segal JL; Tsuda MC; Mattei L; Waters EM; Romeo RD; Milner TA; McEwen BS; Ogawa S. 2012. Estradiol acts via estrogen receptors alpha and beta on pathways important for synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampal formation. Neuroscience 202:131-46. [PubMed: 22133892]  [MGI Ref ID J:184411]

Stenberg AE; Wang H; Sahlin L; Stierna P; Enmark E; Hultcrantz M. 2002. Estrogen receptors alpha and beta in the inner ear of the 'Turner mouse' and an estrogen receptor beta knockout mouse. Hear Res 166(1-2):1-8. [PubMed: 12062753]  [MGI Ref ID J:108892]

Susiarjo M; Hassold TJ; Freeman E; Hunt PA. 2007. Bisphenol A Exposure In Utero Disrupts Early Oogenesis in the Mouse. PLoS Genet 3(1):e5. [PubMed: 17222059]  [MGI Ref ID J:120279]

Svenson JL; EuDaly J; Ruiz P; Korach KS; Gilkeson GS. 2008. Impact of estrogen receptor deficiency on disease expression in the NZM2410 lupus prone mouse. Clin Immunol 128(2):259-68. [PubMed: 18514033]  [MGI Ref ID J:137724]

Temple JL; Scordalakes EM; Bodo C; Gustafsson JA; Rissman EF. 2003. Lack of functional estrogen receptor beta gene disrupts pubertal male sexual behavior. Horm Behav 44(5):427-34. [PubMed: 14644637]  [MGI Ref ID J:102551]

Umetani M; Domoto H; Gormley AK; Yuhanna IS; Cummins CL; Javitt NB; Korach KS; Shaul PW; Mangelsdorf DJ. 2007. 27-Hydroxycholesterol is an endogenous SERM that inhibits the cardiovascular effects of estrogen. Nat Med 13(10):1185-92. [PubMed: 17873880]  [MGI Ref ID J:129931]

Vidal O; Lindberg MK; Hollberg K; Baylink DJ; Andersson G; Lubahn DB; Mohan S; Gustafsson JA; Ohlsson C. 2000. Estrogen receptor specificity in the regulation of skeletal growth and maturation in male mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97(10):5474-9. [PubMed: 10805804]  [MGI Ref ID J:62222]

Voltz JW; Card JW; Carey MA; Degraff LM; Ferguson CD; Flake GP; Bonner JC; Korach KS; Zeldin DC. 2008. Male sex hormones exacerbate lung function impairment after bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 39(1):45-52. [PubMed: 18276795]  [MGI Ref ID J:151063]

Wada-Hiraike O; Hiraike H; Okinaga H; Imamov O; Barros RP; Morani A; Omoto Y; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2006. Role of estrogen receptor beta in uterine stroma and epithelium: Insights from estrogen receptor beta-/- mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103(48):18350-5. [PubMed: 17110437]  [MGI Ref ID J:117146]

Wada-Hiraike O; Imamov O; Hiraike H; Hultenby K; Schwend T; Omoto Y; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2006. Role of estrogen receptor (beta) in colonic epithelium Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103(8):2959-64. [PubMed: 16477031]  [MGI Ref ID J:107308]

Walf AA; Koonce C; Manley K; Frye CA. 2009. Proestrous compared to diestrous wildtype, but not estrogen receptor beta knockout, mice have better performance in the spontaneous alternation and object recognition tasks and reduced anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus and mirror maze. Behav Brain Res 196(2):254-60. [PubMed: 18926853]  [MGI Ref ID J:148629]

Walf AA; Koonce CJ; Frye CA. 2008. Estradiol or diarylpropionitrile administration to wild type, but not estrogen receptor beta knockout, mice enhances performance in the object recognition and object placement tasks. Neurobiol Learn Mem 89(4):513-21. [PubMed: 18313947]  [MGI Ref ID J:154433]

Wang C; Dehghani B; Magrisso IJ; Rick EA; Bonhomme E; Cody DB; Elenich LA; Subramanian S; Murphy SJ; Kelly MJ; Rosenbaum JS; Vandenbark AA; Offner H. 2008. GPR30 Contributes to Estrogen-Induced Thymic Atrophy. Mol Endocrinol 22(3):636-48. [PubMed: 18063692]  [MGI Ref ID J:131313]

Wang L; Andersson S; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2003. Estrogen receptor (ER)beta knockout mice reveal a role for ERbeta in migration of cortical neurons in the developing brain. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100(2):703-8. [PubMed: 12515851]  [MGI Ref ID J:81418]

Wang L; Andersson S; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2001. Morphological abnormalities in the brains of estrogen receptor beta knockout mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98(5):2792-6. [PubMed: 11226319]  [MGI Ref ID J:67862]

Wang M; Wang Y; Weil B; Abarbanell A; Herrmann J; Tan J; Kelly M; Meldrum DR. 2009. Estrogen receptor {beta} mediates increased activation of PI3K/Akt signaling and improved myocardial function in female hearts following acute ischemia. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 296(4):R972-8. [PubMed: 19211725]  [MGI Ref ID J:146841]

Weige CC; Allred KF; Allred CD. 2009. Estradiol alters cell growth in nonmalignant colonocytes and reduces the formation of preneoplastic lesions in the colon. Cancer Res 69(23):9118-24. [PubMed: 19903848]  [MGI Ref ID J:155055]

Weihua Z; Lathe R; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2002. An endocrine pathway in the prostate, ERbeta, AR, 5alpha-androstane-3beta,17beta-diol, and CYP7B1, regulates prostate growth. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99(21):13589-94. [PubMed: 12370428]  [MGI Ref ID J:126711]

Weihua Z; Saji S; Makinen S; Cheng G; Jensen EV; Warner M; Gustafsson JA. 2000. Estrogen receptor (ER) beta, a modulator of ERalpha in the uterus. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97(11):5936-41. [PubMed: 10823946]  [MGI Ref ID J:126421]

Windahl SH; Hollberg K; Vidal O; Gustafsson JA; Ohlsson C; Andersson G. 2001. Female estrogen receptor beta-/- mice are partially protected against age-related trabecular bone loss. J Bone Miner Res 16(8):1388-98. [PubMed: 11499861]  [MGI Ref ID J:112514]

Windahl SH; Vidal O; Andersson G; Gustafsson JA; Ohlsson C. 1999. Increased cortical bone mineral content but unchanged trabecular bone mineral density in female ERbeta(-/-) mice. J Clin Invest 104(7):895-901. [PubMed: 10510330]  [MGI Ref ID J:57977]

Wintermantel TM; Campbell RE; Porteous R; Bock D; Grone HJ; Todman MG; Korach KS; Greiner E; Perez CA; Schutz G; Herbison AE. 2006. Definition of estrogen receptor pathway critical for estrogen positive feedback to gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons and fertility. Neuron 52(2):271-80. [PubMed: 17046690]  [MGI Ref ID J:117231]

Yamamoto Y; Moore R; Hess HA; Guo GL; Gonzalez FJ; Korach KS; Maronpot RR; Negishi M. 2006. Estrogen receptor alpha mediates 17alpha-ethynylestradiol causing hepatotoxicity. J Biol Chem 281(24):16625-31. [PubMed: 16606610]  [MGI Ref ID J:113721]

Yang SH; Sarkar SN; Liu R; Perez EJ; Wang X; Wen Y; Yan LJ; Simpkins JW. 2009. Estrogen receptor beta as a mitochondrial vulnerability factor. J Biol Chem 284(14):9540-8. [PubMed: 19189968]  [MGI Ref ID J:148810]

Zhou XW; Gustafsson JA; Tanila H; Bjorkdahl C; Liu R; Winblad B; Pei JJ. 2008. Tau hyperphosphorylation correlates with reduced methylation of protein phosphatase 2A. Neurobiol Dis 31(3):386-94. [PubMed: 18586097]  [MGI Ref ID J:138611]

Zhu Y; Bian Z; Lu P; Karas RH; Bao L; Cox D; Hodgin J; Shaul PW; Thoren P; Smithies O; Gustafsson JA; Mendelsohn ME. 2002. Abnormal vascular function and hypertension in mice deficient in estrogen receptor beta. Science 295(5554):505-8. [PubMed: 11799247]  [MGI Ref ID J:73898]

Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Room Number           AX11

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryThe line is maintained by breeding heterozygous females to homozygous males.
Mating SystemHeterozygote x Homozygote         (Female x Male)   01-MAR-06
Diet Information LabDiet® 5K52/5K67

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


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Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $232.00Female or MaleHeterozygous for Esr2tm1Unc  
$232.00Female or MaleHomozygous for Esr2tm1Unc  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$464.00Heterozygous for Esr2tm1Unc x Homozygous for Esr2tm1Unc  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $301.60Female or MaleHeterozygous for Esr2tm1Unc  
$301.60Female or MaleHomozygous for Esr2tm1Unc  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$603.20Heterozygous for Esr2tm1Unc x Homozygous for Esr2tm1Unc  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J (approximate)
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
Surgical and Preconditioning Services
JAX® Services
Customer Services and Support
Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
Technical Support Email Form

Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


For Licensing and Use Restrictions view the link(s) below:
- Use of MICE by companies or for-profit entities requires a license prior to shipping.

Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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