Strain Name:

B6.129P2-Akt1tm1Mbb/J

Stock Number:

004912

Order this mouse

Availability:

Repository- Live

Use Restrictions Apply, see Terms of Use
These thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1 knock-out mice have defects in both fetal and postnatal growth persisting into adulthood, and may be useful in studies related to organismal growth.

Description

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Mating SystemHeterozygote x +/+ sibling         (Female x Male)   19-NOV-08
Specieslaboratory mouse
GenerationN10+N1F1N2F7 (16-DEC-13)
Generation Definitions
 
Donating Investigator Morris J. Birnbaum,   Un of Pennsylvania Schl of Medicine

Description
Mice that are homozygous for the targeted mutation are viable and do not display any gross behavioral abnormalities. Homozygotes exhibit lower fertility. Female homozygotes do not nurse well; up to 50% perinatal mortality can occur. No gene product (mRNA or protein) is detected by Northern or Western blot analysis of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Homozygotes are only 80% of wildtype body weight at birth, and remain small. This mutant mouse strain may be useful in related to organismal growth.

Development
A targeting vector containing neomycin resistance and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase genes was used to disrupt exons 4 through 7 and the 5' end of exon 8. The construct was electroporated into 129P2Ola/Hsd derived E14 embryonic stem (ES) cells. Correctly targeted ES cells were injected into C57BL/6 blastocysts. The resulting chimeric male animals were crossed to C57BL/6 mice, and then backcrossed to the same for 10 generations (March 2003).

A 32 SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) panel analysis, with 27 markers covering all 19 chromosomes and the X chromosome, as well as 5 markers that distinguish between the C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N substrains, was performed on the rederived living colony at The Jackson Laboratory Repository. While the 27 markers throughout the genome suggested a C57BL/6 genetic background, 2 of 5 markers that determine C57BL/6J from C57BL/6N were found to be segregating. These data suggest the mice sent to The Jackson Laboratory Repository were on a C57BL/6N genetic background.

Control Information

  Control
   Wild-type from the colony
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
- Model with phenotypic similarity to human disease where etiologies involve orthologs. Human genes are associated with this disease. Orthologs of those genes appear in the mouse genotype(s).
Schizophrenia; SCZD
- Potential model based on gene homology relationships. Phenotypic similarity to the human disease has not been tested.
Breast Cancer   (AKT1)
Cowden Syndrome 6; CWS6   (AKT1)
Ovarian Cancer   (AKT1)
Proteus Syndrome   (AKT1)
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Akt1tm1Mbb/Akt1tm1Mbb

        B6.129P2-Akt1tm1Mbb
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • decreased susceptibility to diet-induced obesity
    • when fed a high fat diet   (MGI Ref ID J:182721)
  • increased basal metabolism
    • when fed normal chow or a high fat diet   (MGI Ref ID J:182721)
  • increased carbon dioxide production
    • when fed normal chow or a high fat diet   (MGI Ref ID J:182721)
  • increased oxygen consumption
    • when fed normal chow or a high fat diet   (MGI Ref ID J:182721)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • decreased body weight
    • when fed normal chow or a high fat diet   (MGI Ref ID J:182721)
  • decreased lean body mass
    • when fed normal chow or a high fat diet   (MGI Ref ID J:182721)
  • decreased percent body fat
    • when fed normal chow or a high fat diet   (MGI Ref ID J:182721)
  • decreased susceptibility to diet-induced obesity
    • when fed a high fat diet   (MGI Ref ID J:182721)
  • adipose tissue phenotype
  • decreased percent body fat
    • when fed normal chow or a high fat diet   (MGI Ref ID J:182721)

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Akt1tm1Mbb/Akt1tm1Mbb

        involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
  • mortality/aging
  • partial postnatal lethality
    • normal numbers of homozygous embryos at E13.5   (MGI Ref ID J:72176)
    • by 2-3 weeks after birth, fewer than expected numbers of homozygotes seen   (MGI Ref ID J:72176)
    • significant numbers of deaths among homozygotes observed with first three days of life   (MGI Ref ID J:72176)
    • survivors were fertile   (MGI Ref ID J:72176)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • decreased prepulse inhibition
    • in mice treated with amphetamine   (MGI Ref ID J:185487)
    • however, mice exhibit normal prepulse inhibition at baseline or following treatment with MK801   (MGI Ref ID J:185487)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • decreased body weight
    • 20% reduction in body weight at birth   (MGI Ref ID J:72176)
    • at 14 months, homozygous males were only about 75% normal weight   (MGI Ref ID J:72176)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • *normal* behavior/neurological phenotype
    • mice exhibit normal startle response   (MGI Ref ID J:185487)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Akt1tm1Mbb related

Cell Biology Research
Genes Regulating Growth and Proliferation

Developmental Biology Research
Growth Defects
      Growth Defects (homozygous)

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Akt1tm1Mbb
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Morris J Birnbaum
Allele Type Targeted (knock-out)
Common Name(s) Akt-;
Mutation Made By Morris Birnbaum,   Un of Pennsylvania Schl of Medicine
Strain of Origin129P2/OlaHsd
ES Cell Line NameE14
ES Cell Line Strain129P2/OlaHsd
Gene Symbol and Name Akt1, thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1
Chromosome 12
Gene Common Name(s) AKT; CWS6; PKB; PKB-ALPHA; PKB/Akt; PKBalpha; PRKBA; RAC; RAC-ALPHA;
Molecular Note A neomycin resistance gene was used to replace exons 4 through 7 and the 5' portion of exon 8. Exon 5 is known to encode an lysine residue essential for catalytic activity. Expression was undetected in homozygous mutant animals by both Northern and Western blot analyses. The authors noted that the expression of Akt2 and Akt3 was normal in mice homozygous for the targeted allele. [MGI Ref ID J:72176]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Akt1tm1Mbb, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Cho H; Thorvaldsen JL; Chu Q; Feng F; Birnbaum MJ. 2001. Akt1/pkbalpha is required for normal growth but dispensable for maintenance of glucose homeostasis in mice. J Biol Chem 276(42):38349-52. [PubMed: 11533044]  [MGI Ref ID J:72176]

Additional References

Akt1tm1Mbb related

Ackah E; Yu J; Zoellner S; Iwakiri Y; Skurk C; Shibata R; Ouchi N; Easton RM; Galasso G; Birnbaum MJ; Walsh K; Sessa WC. 2005. Akt1/protein kinase Balpha is critical for ischemic and VEGF-mediated angiogenesis. J Clin Invest 115(8):2119-2127. [PubMed: 16075056]  [MGI Ref ID J:100143]

Beiser DG; Wojcik KR; Zhao D; Orbelyan GA; Hamann KJ; Vanden Hoek TL. 2010. Akt1 genetic deficiency limits hypothermia cardioprotection following murine cardiac arrest. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 298(6):H1761-8. [PubMed: 20363892]  [MGI Ref ID J:160448]

Boxer RB; Stairs DB; Dugan KD; Notarfrancesco KL; Portocarrero CP; Keister BA; Belka GK; Cho H; Rathmell JC; Thompson CB; Birnbaum MJ; Chodosh LA. 2006. Isoform-specific requirement for Akt1 in the developmental regulation of cellular metabolism during lactation. Cell Metab 4(6):475-90. [PubMed: 17141631]  [MGI Ref ID J:129773]

Brown C; LaRocca J; Pietruska J; Ota M; Anderson L; Smith SD; Weston P; Rasoulpour T; Hixon ML. 2010. Subfertility caused by altered follicular development and oocyte growth in female mice lacking PKB alpha/Akt1. Biol Reprod 82(2):246-56. [PubMed: 19794155]  [MGI Ref ID J:156635]

Calamito M; Juntilla MM; Thomas M; Northrup DL; Rathmell J; Birnbaum MJ; Koretzky G; Allman D. 2010. Akt1 and Akt2 promote peripheral B-cell maturation and survival. Blood 115(20):4043-50. [PubMed: 20042722]  [MGI Ref ID J:160279]

Canaud G; Bienaime F; Viau A; Treins C; Baron W; Nguyen C; Burtin M; Berissi S; Giannakakis K; Muda AO; Zschiedrich S; Huber TB; Friedlander G; Legendre C; Pontoglio M; Pende M; Terzi F. 2013. AKT2 is essential to maintain podocyte viability and function during chronic kidney disease. Nat Med 19(10):1288-96. [PubMed: 24056770]  [MGI Ref ID J:202319]

Carraway MS; Suliman HB; Jones WS; Chen CW; Babiker A; Piantadosi CA. 2010. Erythropoietin activates mitochondrial biogenesis and couples red cell mass to mitochondrial mass in the heart. Circ Res 106(11):1722-30. [PubMed: 20395592]  [MGI Ref ID J:172704]

Chang X; Lazorchak AS; Liu D; Su B. 2012. Sin1 regulates Treg-cell development but is not required for T-cell growth and proliferation. Eur J Immunol 42(6):1639-47. [PubMed: 22678916]  [MGI Ref ID J:187755]

Chen CC; Stairs DB; Boxer RB; Belka GK; Horseman ND; Alvarez JV; Chodosh LA. 2012. Autocrine prolactin induced by the Pten-Akt pathway is required for lactation initiation and provides a direct link between the Akt and Stat5 pathways. Genes Dev 26(19):2154-68. [PubMed: 23028142]  [MGI Ref ID J:188260]

Chen YC; Chen YW; Hsu YF; Chang WT; Hsiao CK; Min MY; Lai WS. 2012. Akt1 deficiency modulates reward learning and reward prediction error in mice. Genes Brain Behav 11(2):157-69. [PubMed: 22151747]  [MGI Ref ID J:198105]

Chen YW; Lai WS. 2011. Behavioral phenotyping of v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1-deficient mice reveals a sex-specific prepulse inhibition deficit in females that can be partially alleviated by glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors but not by antipsychotics. Neuroscience 174:178-89. [PubMed: 20888398]  [MGI Ref ID J:170183]

DeBosch B; Sambandam N; Weinheimer C; Courtois M; Muslin AJ. 2006. Akt2 regulates cardiac metabolism and cardiomyocyte survival. J Biol Chem 281(43):32841-51. [PubMed: 16950770]  [MGI Ref ID J:117383]

DeBosch B; Treskov I; Lupu TS; Weinheimer C; Kovacs A; Courtois M; Muslin AJ. 2006. Akt1 is required for physiological cardiac growth. Circulation 113(17):2097-104. [PubMed: 16636172]  [MGI Ref ID J:122451]

Di Lorenzo A; Fernandez-Hernando C; Cirino G; Sessa WC. 2009. Akt1 is critical for acute inflammation and histamine-mediated vascular leakage. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106(34):14552-7. [PubMed: 19622728]  [MGI Ref ID J:152016]

Dickey CA; Koren J; Zhang YJ; Xu YF; Jinwal UK; Birnbaum MJ; Monks B; Sun M; Cheng JQ; Patterson C; Bailey RM; Dunmore J; Soresh S; Leon C; Morgan D; Petrucelli L. 2008. Akt and CHIP coregulate tau degradation through coordinated interactions. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105(9):3622-7. [PubMed: 18292230]  [MGI Ref ID J:132677]

Easton RM; Cho H; Roovers K; Shineman DW; Mizrahi M; Forman MS; Lee VM; Szabolcs M; de Jong R; Oltersdorf T; Ludwig T; Efstratiadis A; Birnbaum MJ. 2005. Role for Akt3/protein kinase Bgamma in attainment of normal brain size. Mol Cell Biol 25(5):1869-78. [PubMed: 15713641]  [MGI Ref ID J:96823]

Emamian ES; Hall D; Birnbaum MJ; Karayiorgou M; Gogos JA. 2004. Convergent evidence for impaired AKT1-GSK3beta signaling in schizophrenia. Nat Genet 36(2):131-7. [PubMed: 14745448]  [MGI Ref ID J:185487]

Espeillac C; Mitchell C; Celton-Morizur S; Chauvin C; Koka V; Gillet C; Albrecht JH; Desdouets C; Pende M. 2011. S6 kinase 1 is required for rapamycin-sensitive liver proliferation after mouse hepatectomy. J Clin Invest 121(7):2821-32. [PubMed: 21633171]  [MGI Ref ID J:175661]

Fernandez-Hernando C; Ackah E; Yu J; Suarez Y; Murata T; Iwakiri Y; Prendergast J; Miao RQ; Birnbaum MJ; Sessa WC. 2007. Loss of akt1 leads to severe atherosclerosis and occlusive coronary artery disease. Cell Metab 6(6):446-57. [PubMed: 18054314]  [MGI Ref ID J:130443]

Fernandez-Hernando C; Jozsef L; Jenkins D; Di Lorenzo A; Sessa WC. 2009. Absence of Akt1 reduces vascular smooth muscle cell migration and survival and induces features of plaque vulnerability and cardiac dysfunction during atherosclerosis. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 29(12):2033-40. [PubMed: 19762778]  [MGI Ref ID J:167794]

Gibbons AV; Lin JE; Kim GW; Marszalowicz GP; Li P; Stoecker BA; Blomain ES; Rattan S; Snook AE; Schulz S; Waldman SA. 2013. Intestinal GUCY2C prevents TGF-beta secretion coordinating desmoplasia and hyperproliferation in colorectal cancer. Cancer Res 73(22):6654-66. [PubMed: 24085786]  [MGI Ref ID J:205053]

Goncalves MD; Pistilli EE; Balduzzi A; Birnbaum MJ; Lachey J; Khurana TS; Ahima RS. 2010. Akt deficiency attenuates muscle size and function but not the response to ActRIIB inhibition. PLoS One 5(9):e12707. [PubMed: 20856813]  [MGI Ref ID J:165125]

Hammerman PS; Fox CJ; Birnbaum MJ; Thompson CB. 2005. Pim and Akt oncogenes are independent regulators of hematopoietic cell growth and survival. Blood 105(11):4477-83. [PubMed: 15705789]  [MGI Ref ID J:98472]

Hollander MC; Maier CR; Hobbs EA; Ashmore AR; Linnoila RI; Dennis PA. 2011. Akt1 deletion prevents lung tumorigenesis by mutant K-ras. Oncogene 30(15):1812-21. [PubMed: 21242979]  [MGI Ref ID J:170765]

Jacobs SR; Herman CE; Maciver NJ; Wofford JA; Wieman HL; Hammen JJ; Rathmell JC. 2008. Glucose Uptake Is Limiting in T Cell Activation and Requires CD28-Mediated Akt-Dependent and Independent Pathways. J Immunol 180(7):4476-86. [PubMed: 18354169]  [MGI Ref ID J:132993]

Jee HJ; Kim HJ; Kim AJ; Bae YS; Bae SS; Yun J. 2009. UV light induces premature senescence in Akt1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts by increasing intracellular levels of ROS. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 383(3):358-62. [PubMed: 19364500]  [MGI Ref ID J:149681]

Jorgensen ND; Andresen JM; Lagalwar S; Armstrong B; Stevens S; Byam CE; Duvick LA; Lai S; Jafar-Nejad P; Zoghbi HY; Clark HB; Orr HT. 2009. Phosphorylation of ATXN1 at Ser776 in the cerebellum. J Neurochem 110(2):675-86. [PubMed: 19500214]  [MGI Ref ID J:150968]

Ju R; Zhuang ZW; Zhang J; Lanahan AA; Kyriakides T; Sessa WC; Simons M. 2014. Angiopoietin-2 secretion by endothelial cell exosomes: regulation by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and syndecan-4/syntenin pathways. J Biol Chem 289(1):510-9. [PubMed: 24235146]  [MGI Ref ID J:207185]

Juntilla MM; Patil VD; Calamito M; Joshi RP; Birnbaum MJ; Koretzky GA. 2010. AKT1 and AKT2 maintain hematopoietic stem cell function by regulating reactive oxygen species. Blood 115(20):4030-8. [PubMed: 20354168]  [MGI Ref ID J:160459]

Kent LN; Ohboshi S; Soares MJ. 2012. Akt1 and insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) regulate placentation and fetal/postnatal development. Int J Dev Biol 56(4):255-61. [PubMed: 22562201]  [MGI Ref ID J:184520]

Kiessling S; Lutz-Nicoladoni C; Olsson A; Niederegger H; Baier G; Villunger A. 2007. Compensatory mechanisms regulate the Bcl-2 rheostat and lymphocyte survival in the absence of AKT1/PKBalpha. Cell Death Differ 14(1):186-9. [PubMed: 16778831]  [MGI Ref ID J:132346]

Krawczyk CM; Holowka T; Sun J; Blagih J; Amiel E; DeBerardinis RJ; Cross JR; Jung E; Thompson CB; Jones RG; Pearce EJ. 2010. Toll-like receptor-induced changes in glycolytic metabolism regulate dendritic cell activation. Blood 115(23):4742-9. [PubMed: 20351312]  [MGI Ref ID J:161548]

Kvajo M; McKellar H; Gogos JA. 2012. Avoiding mouse traps in schizophrenia genetics: lessons and promises from current and emerging mouse models. Neuroscience 211:136-64. [PubMed: 21821099]  [MGI Ref ID J:184660]

LaRocca J; Pietruska J; Hixon M. 2011. Akt1 is essential for postnatal mammary gland development, function, and the expression of Btn1a1. PLoS One 6(9):e24432. [PubMed: 21915327]  [MGI Ref ID J:177888]

Lai WS; Xu B; Westphal KG; Paterlini M; Olivier B; Pavlidis P; Karayiorgou M; Gogos JA. 2006. Akt1 deficiency affects neuronal morphology and predisposes to abnormalities in prefrontal cortex functioning. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103(45):16906-11. [PubMed: 17077150]  [MGI Ref ID J:117100]

Lazorchak AS; Liu D; Facchinetti V; Di Lorenzo A; Sessa WC; Schatz DG; Su B. 2010. Sin1-mTORC2 suppresses rag and il7r gene expression through Akt2 in B cells. Mol Cell 39(3):433-43. [PubMed: 20705244]  [MGI Ref ID J:163678]

Li D; August S; Woulfe DS. 2008. GSK3beta is a negative regulator of platelet function and thrombosis. Blood 111(7):3522-30. [PubMed: 18218855]  [MGI Ref ID J:133503]

Li G; Anderson RE; Tomita H; Adler R; Liu X; Zack DJ; Rajala RV. 2007. Nonredundant role of Akt2 for neuroprotection of rod photoreceptor cells from light-induced cell death. J Neurosci 27(1):203-11. [PubMed: 17202487]  [MGI Ref ID J:117208]

Lin JE; Li P; Snook AE; Schulz S; Dasgupta A; Hyslop TM; Gibbons AV; Marszlowicz G; Pitari GM; Waldman SA. 2010. The hormone receptor GUCY2C suppresses intestinal tumor formation by inhibiting AKT signaling. Gastroenterology 138(1):241-54. [PubMed: 19737566]  [MGI Ref ID J:185258]

Lin JE; Snook AE; Li P; Stoecker BA; Kim GW; Magee MS; Garcia AV; Valentino MA; Hyslop T; Schulz S; Waldman SA. 2012. GUCY2C opposes systemic genotoxic tumorigenesis by regulating AKT-dependent intestinal barrier integrity. PLoS One 7(2):e31686. [PubMed: 22384056]  [MGI Ref ID J:185303]

Lu M; Wan M; Leavens KF; Chu Q; Monks BR; Fernandez S; Ahima RS; Ueki K; Kahn CR; Birnbaum MJ. 2012. Insulin regulates liver metabolism in vivo in the absence of hepatic Akt and Foxo1. Nat Med 18(3):388-95. [PubMed: 22344295]  [MGI Ref ID J:181642]

Maruyama S; Shibata R; Ohashi K; Ohashi T; Daida H; Walsh K; Murohara T; Ouchi N. 2011. Adiponectin ameliorates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity through Akt protein-dependent mechanism. J Biol Chem 286(37):32790-800. [PubMed: 21784858]  [MGI Ref ID J:176739]

Mogi M; Yang J; Lambert JF; Colvin GA; Shiojima I; Skurk C; Summer R; Fine A; Quesenberry PJ; Walsh K. 2003. Akt signaling regulates side population cell phenotype via Bcrp1 translocation. J Biol Chem 278(40):39068-75. [PubMed: 12851395]  [MGI Ref ID J:132379]

Nishi J; Minamino T; Miyauchi H; Nojima A; Tateno K; Okada S; Orimo M; Moriya J; Fong GH; Sunagawa K; Shibuya M; Komuro I. 2008. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 regulates postnatal angiogenesis through inhibition of the excessive activation of Akt. Circ Res 103(3):261-8. [PubMed: 18583712]  [MGI Ref ID J:151369]

Nojima A; Yamashita M; Yoshida Y; Shimizu I; Ichimiya H; Kamimura N; Kobayashi Y; Ohta S; Ishii N; Minamino T. 2013. Haploinsufficiency of akt1 prolongs the lifespan of mice. PLoS One 8(7):e69178. [PubMed: 23935948]  [MGI Ref ID J:204947]

Peng C; Chen Y; Yang Z; Zhang H; Osterby L; Rosmarin AG; Li S. 2010. PTEN is a tumor suppressor in CML stem cells and BCR-ABL-induced leukemias in mice. Blood 115(3):626-35. [PubMed: 19965668]  [MGI Ref ID J:156831]

Phung TL; Ziv K; Dabydeen D; Eyiah-Mensah G; Riveros M; Perruzzi C; Sun J; Monahan-Earley RA; Shiojima I; Nagy JA; Lin MI; Walsh K; Dvorak AM; Briscoe DM; Neeman M; Sessa WC; Dvorak HF; Benjamin LE. 2006. Pathological angiogenesis is induced by sustained Akt signaling and inhibited by rapamycin. Cancer Cell 10(2):159-70. [PubMed: 16904613]  [MGI Ref ID J:112695]

Piantadosi CA; Carraway MS; Babiker A; Suliman HB. 2008. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis via Nrf2-mediated transcriptional control of nuclear respiratory factor-1. Circ Res 103(11):1232-40. [PubMed: 18845810]  [MGI Ref ID J:155283]

Qiao G; Zhao Y; Li Z; Tang PQ; Langdon WY; Yang T; Zhang J. 2013. T cell activation threshold regulated by E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b determines fate of inducible regulatory T cells. J Immunol 191(2):632-9. [PubMed: 23749633]  [MGI Ref ID J:204828]

Rajala A; Dighe R; Agbaga MP; Anderson RE; Rajala RV. 2013. Insulin receptor signaling in cones. J Biol Chem 288(27):19503-15. [PubMed: 23673657]  [MGI Ref ID J:199655]

Rasoulpour T; DiPalma K; Kolvek B; Hixon M. 2006. Akt1 suppresses radiation-induced germ cell apoptosis in vivo. Endocrinology 147(9):4213-21. [PubMed: 16763066]  [MGI Ref ID J:129523]

Rastogi R; Jiang Z; Ahmad N; Rosati R; Liu Y; Beuret L; Monks R; Charron J; Birnbaum MJ; Samavati L. 2013. Rapamycin induces mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) expression through activation of protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase pathways. J Biol Chem 288(47):33966-77. [PubMed: 24126911]  [MGI Ref ID J:204975]

Rogers R; Ouellet G; Brown C; Moyer B; Rasoulpour T; Hixon M. 2008. Cross-talk between the Akt and NF-kappaB signaling pathways inhibits MEHP-induced germ cell apoptosis. Toxicol Sci 106(2):497-508. [PubMed: 18755736]  [MGI Ref ID J:142547]

Saji M; Narahara K; McCarty SK; Vasko VV; La Perle KM; Porter K; Jarjoura D; Lu C; Cheng SY; Ringel MD. 2011. Akt1 deficiency delays tumor progression, vascular invasion, and distant metastasis in a murine model of thyroid cancer. Oncogene 30(42):4307-15. [PubMed: 21532616]  [MGI Ref ID J:177100]

Shimizu I; Minamino T; Toko H; Okada S; Ikeda H; Yasuda N; Tateno K; Moriya J; Yokoyama M; Nojima A; Koh GY; Akazawa H; Shiojima I; Kahn CR; Abel ED; Komuro I. 2010. Excessive cardiac insulin signaling exacerbates systolic dysfunction induced by pressure overload in rodents. J Clin Invest 120(5):1506-14. [PubMed: 20407209]  [MGI Ref ID J:161466]

Wan M; Easton RM; Gleason CE; Monks BR; Ueki K; Kahn CR; Birnbaum MJ. 2012. Loss of Akt1 in mice increases energy expenditure and protects against diet-induced obesity. Mol Cell Biol 32(1):96-106. [PubMed: 22037765]  [MGI Ref ID J:182721]

Wofford JA; Wieman HL; Jacobs SR; Zhao Y; Rathmell JC. 2008. IL-7 promotes Glut1 trafficking and glucose uptake via STAT5-mediated activation of Akt to support T-cell survival. Blood 111(4):2101-11. [PubMed: 18042802]  [MGI Ref ID J:131334]

Woulfe D; Jiang H; Morgans A; Monks R; Birnbaum M; Brass LF. 2004. Defects in secretion, aggregation, and thrombus formation in platelets from mice lacking Akt2. J Clin Invest 113(3):441-50. [PubMed: 14755341]  [MGI Ref ID J:87588]

Xin X; Chen S; Khan ZA; Chakrabarti S. 2007. Akt activation and augmented fibronectin production in hyperhexosemia. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 293(4):E1036-44. [PubMed: 17666488]  [MGI Ref ID J:125528]

Yang KC; Tseng YT; Nerbonne JM. 2012. Exercise training and PI3Kalpha-induced electrical remodeling is independent of cellular hypertrophy and Akt signaling. J Mol Cell Cardiol 53(4):532-41. [PubMed: 22824041]  [MGI Ref ID J:188789]

Yang ZF; Zhang H; Ma L; Peng C; Chen Y; Wang J; Green MR; Li S; Rosmarin AG. 2013. GABP transcription factor is required for development of chronic myelogenous leukemia via its control of PRKD2. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110(6):2312-7. [PubMed: 23345428]  [MGI Ref ID J:194335]

Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Room Number           MGL375

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryThis strain originated on a B6;129 background and has been backcrossed to C57BL/6 for at least 10 generations (March 2003). The strain is maintained as a heterozygote. Homozygotes are reported to be less fertile. Female homozygotes do not nurse well; up to 50% perinatal mortality can occur.
Mating SystemHeterozygote x +/+ sibling         (Female x Male)   19-NOV-08
Diet Information LabDiet® 5K52/5K67

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $232.00Female or MaleHeterozygous for Akt1tm1Mbb  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$302.00Heterozygous for Akt1tm1Mbb x Wild-type for Akt1tm1Mbb  
$302.00Wild-type for Akt1tm1Mbb x Heterozygous for Akt1tm1Mbb  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1500 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for both large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current demand for each strain. If a Repository strain is not immediately available, then within 2 to 3 business days, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order along with various delivery options. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age and will not exceed 12 weeks of age on the day of shipping. We will note and try to accommodate requests for specific ages of Repository strains but cannot guarantee provision of these strains at specific ages. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, please let us know.

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $301.60Female or MaleHeterozygous for Akt1tm1Mbb  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$392.60Heterozygous for Akt1tm1Mbb x Wild-type for Akt1tm1Mbb  
$392.60Wild-type for Akt1tm1Mbb x Heterozygous for Akt1tm1Mbb  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1500 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for both large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current demand for each strain. If a Repository strain is not immediately available, then within 2 to 3 business days, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order along with various delivery options. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age and will not exceed 12 weeks of age on the day of shipping. We will note and try to accommodate requests for specific ages of Repository strains but cannot guarantee provision of these strains at specific ages. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, please let us know.

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1500 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for both large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current demand for each strain. If a Repository strain is not immediately available, then within 2 to 3 business days, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order along with various delivery options. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age and will not exceed 12 weeks of age on the day of shipping. We will note and try to accommodate requests for specific ages of Repository strains but cannot guarantee provision of these strains at specific ages. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, please let us know.

Control Information

  Control
   Wild-type from the colony
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
Surgical and Preconditioning Services
JAX® Services
Customer Services and Support
Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
Technical Support Email Form

Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


For Licensing and Use Restrictions view the link(s) below:
- Use of MICE by companies or for-profit entities requires a license prior to shipping.

Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


(6.6)