Strain Name:

B6.129S4-Grin1tm2Stl/J

Stock Number:

005246

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Availability:

Repository- Live

Use Restrictions Apply, see Terms of Use
These floxed NR1 mice allow deletion of the GluN1 subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in Cre recombinase expressing cells/tissues. These mice may be useful in studying the NMDAR and its downstream signaling molecules/pathways (including alpha-CaMKII and mTOR), synaptic plasticity (learning and memory) and social behavior.

Description

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Mating SystemHomozygote x Homozygote         (Female x Male)   02-JUN-06
Specieslaboratory mouse
GenerationN9+N1F5 (11-DEC-13)
Generation Definitions
 
Donating InvestigatorDr. Susumu Tonegawa,   Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Description
These floxed NR1 (Grin1flox) mice possess loxP sites flanking approximately 12 kbp of sequence of the targeted gene that encodes the entire transmembrane domain and C-terminal region. Mice that are homozygous for this allele are viable, fertile, normal in size and do not display any gross physical or behavioral abnormalities.

When bred to a strain expressing Cre recombinase in the CA3 region of the hippocampus (see Stock No. 006474 for example), this mutant mouse strain may be useful in studies of associative memory recall.

When bred to a strain expressing Cre recombinase in the CA1 region of the hippocampus (see Stock No. 005359 for example), this mutant mouse strain may be useful in studies of nonspacial memory.

Development
A targeting vector containing the gene sequence, neomycin resistance and thymidine kinase genes was utilized in the construction of this mutant. A loxP site was inserted between exons 10 and 11. Another loxP site and a neomycin resistance gene were inserted at the 3' end of the gene, 3 kbp downstream of the last exon. The construct was electroporated into 129S4/SvJae derived J1 embryonic stem (ES) cells. Correctly targeted ES cells were injected into C57BL/6 blastocysts. The resulting chimeric animals were crossed to C57BL/6J mice. The colony was then backcrossed to C57BL/6J for eight generations prior to sending to The Jackson Laboratory Repository in 2005 (see SNP note below).

A 32 SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) panel analysis, with 27 markers covering all 19 chromosomes and the X chromosome, as well as 5 markers that distinguish between the C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N substrains, was performed on the rederived living colony at The Jackson Laboratory Repository. While the 27 markers throughout the genome suggested a C57BL/6 genetic background, 3 of 5 markers that determine C57BL/6J from C57BL/6N were found to be segregating. These data suggest the mice sent to The Jackson Laboratory Repository were on a C57BL/6N genetic background.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J (approximate)
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying other alleles of Grin1
018825   B6(Cg)-Grin1tm1c(EUCOMM)Wtsi/ZwzJ
007586   B6;129S4-Drd1atm2Rpa/J
View Strains carrying other alleles of Grin1     (2 strains)

Additional Web Information

Introduction to Cre-lox technology

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
- Potential model based on gene homology relationships. Phenotypic similarity to the human disease has not been tested.
Mental Retardation, Autosomal Dominant 8; MRD8   (GRIN1)
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Grin1tm2Stl/Grin1tm2Stl

        involves: 129S4/SvJae * C57BL/6
  • normal phenotype
  • no abnormal phenotype detected   (MGI Ref ID J:37457)

The following phenotype relates to a compound genotype created using this strain.
Contact JAX® Services jaxservices@jax.org for customized breeding options.

Grin1tm2Stl/Grin1tm2Stl Tg(Camk2a-cre)T29-1Stl/0

        involves: 129S4/SvJae * BALB/c * C57BL/6   (conditional)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal contextual conditioning behavior
    • impaired hippocampus-dependent, but not hippocampus-independent, fear memory that can be rescued with enriched training   (MGI Ref ID J:60730)
  • abnormal object recognition memory
    • deficit in novel object recognition memory that can be partially rescued with enriched training   (MGI Ref ID J:60730)
  • abnormal olfactory -discrimination memory
    • impaired olfactory-discrimination memory that can be rescued with enriched training   (MGI Ref ID J:60730)
  • abnormal spatial learning
    • impaired spatial memory in the hidden-platform Morris water maze test, with some progressive improvement in escape latencies but unimpaired nonspatial learning   (MGI Ref ID J:37457)
  • impaired social transmission of food preference   (MGI Ref ID J:60730)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal excitatory postsynaptic currents
    • lack the slow component of the excitatory postsynaptic current mediated by NMDA receptors   (MGI Ref ID J:37457)
  • absence of NMDA-mediated synaptic currents
    • lack the slow component of the excitatory postsynaptic current mediated by NMDA receptors, however postsynaptic AMPA receptors as well as presynaptic terminals operate normally   (MGI Ref ID J:37457)
  • reduced long term potentiation
    • lack long term potentiation in the CA1 synapses   (MGI Ref ID J:37457)

Grin1tm2Stl/Grin1tm2Stl Tg(Grik4-cre)G32-4Stl/0

        involves: C57BL/6   (conditional)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal spatial learning
    • impaired spatial memory recall after partial cue removal but not under full cue conditions in the Morris water maze and mutants exhibited normal motivation, motor coordination and sensory functions   (MGI Ref ID J:77718)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal NMDA-mediated synaptic currents
    • the 6-cyano-7-dinitroquinoxalline-2,3-dione (DNQX)-insensitive component of the NMDA current was significantly reduced at the recurrent commissural/associational synapse relative to controls   (MGI Ref ID J:77718)
  • abnormal single cell response
    • CA1 pyramidal cells showed a significant decrease in complex spike bursting properties (complex spike index and burst spike frequency) when mutants were engaged in open-field foraging   (MGI Ref ID J:77718)
    • CA1 cells showed significant reductions in burst spike frequency, place field size and integrated firing rate after partial cue removal, however showed no significant changes when mutants were returned to an environment with all the distal cues present   (MGI Ref ID J:77718)
    • decreased firing rate of putative CA1 interneurons   (MGI Ref ID J:77718)
  • reduced long term potentiation
    • long term potentiation was nearly absent at the commissural/associational (CA)-CA3 synapses in 9/11 mutants   (MGI Ref ID J:77718)

Grin1tm2Stl/Grin1tm2Stl Tg(Pomc-cre)1Stl/0

        involves: 129S4/SvJae * C57BL/6 * FVB   (conditional)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • *normal* nervous system phenotype
    • population responses recordings from the stimulated perforant path in the dentate hilus are not different from controls at 20-24 weeks   (MGI Ref ID J:122763)
    • paired-pulse facilitation is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:122763)
    • long term potentiation in area CA1 after Schaffer commissural input stimulation in CA3   (MGI Ref ID J:122763)
    • hippocampal memory and discrimination is normal in mutants (measured by acquisition of contextual fear conditioning)   (MGI Ref ID J:122763)
    • impaired synaptic plasticity
      • theta-burst stimulation of the perforant path (PP) did not evoke potentiation (plasticity) of synapses of the PP-GC (dentate gyrus granule cells)   (MGI Ref ID J:122763)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • *normal* behavior/neurological phenotype
    • open field activity is not different from controls   (MGI Ref ID J:122763)
    • no differences are seen in feeding behavior or body weights compared to controls   (MGI Ref ID J:122763)
    • spatial learning in Morris water maze test is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:122763)
    • abnormal discrimination learning
      • mice show impaired acquisition of a discrimination task compared to controls; deficit is limited to early days of training, but is comparable to controls after extended training   (MGI Ref ID J:122763)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Neurobiology Research
Receptor Defects
      glutamate receptor: NMDA

Research Tools
Cre-lox System
      loxP-flanked Sequences

Grin1tm2Stl related

Neurobiology Research
Behavioral and Learning Defects

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Grin1tm2Stl
Allele Name targeted mutation 2, Susumu Tonegawa
Allele Type Targeted (Floxed/Frt)
Common Name(s) Flox-B; NR1flox; fNR1; floxed-NR1;
Mutation Made ByDr. Susumu Tonegawa,   Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Strain of Origin129S4/SvJae
ES Cell Line NameJ1
ES Cell Line Strain129S4/SvJae
Gene Symbol and Name Grin1, glutamate receptor, ionotropic, NMDA1 (zeta 1)
Chromosome 2
Gene Common Name(s) GluN1; GluRzeta1; M100174; MRD8; NMDA1; NMDAR1; NR1; Nmdar; RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center, 174; Rgsc174;
Molecular Note Insertion of loxP sites flanking the entire transmembrane region (exons 11-21 through the 3' end of the gene). [MGI Ref ID J:37457]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Grin1tm2Stl, High Resolution Melting
Grin1tm2Stl, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Tsien JZ; Chen DF; Gerber D; Tom C; Mercer EH; Anderson DJ; Mayford M; Kandel ER; Tonegawa S. 1996. Subregion- and cell type-restricted gene knockout in mouse brain [see comments] Cell 87(7):1317-26. [PubMed: 8980237]  [MGI Ref ID J:66344]

Additional References

Grin1tm2Stl related

Belforte JE; Zsiros V; Sklar ER; Jiang Z; Yu G; Li Y; Quinlan EM; Nakazawa K. 2010. Postnatal NMDA receptor ablation in corticolimbic interneurons confers schizophrenia-like phenotypes. Nat Neurosci 13(1):76-83. [PubMed: 19915563]  [MGI Ref ID J:156785]

Beutler LR; Wanat MJ; Quintana A; Sanz E; Bamford NS; Zweifel LS; Palmiter RD. 2011. Balanced NMDA receptor activity in dopamine D1 receptor (D1R)- and D2R-expressing medium spiny neurons is required for amphetamine sensitization. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108(10):4206-11. [PubMed: 21368124]  [MGI Ref ID J:170830]

Carlisle HJ; Luong TN; Medina-Marino A; Schenker L; Khorosheva E; Indersmitten T; Gunapala KM; Steele AD; O'Dell TJ; Patterson PH; Kennedy MB. 2011. Deletion of Densin-180 Results in Abnormal Behaviors Associated with Mental Illness and Reduces mGluR5 and DISC1 in the Postsynaptic Density Fraction. J Neurosci 31(45):16194-207. [PubMed: 22072671]  [MGI Ref ID J:177836]

Chen BS; Gray JA; Sanz-Clemente A; Wei Z; Thomas EV; Nicoll RA; Roche KW. 2012. SAP102 mediates synaptic clearance of NMDA receptors. Cell Rep 2(5):1120-8. [PubMed: 23103165]  [MGI Ref ID J:196348]

Cheng HT; Suzuki M; Hegarty DM; Xu Q; Weyerbacher AR; South SM; Ohata M; Inturrisi CE. 2008. Inflammatory pain-induced signaling events following a conditional deletion of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in spinal cord dorsal horn. Neuroscience 155(3):948-58. [PubMed: 18621103]  [MGI Ref ID J:140875]

Christian KM; Miracle AD; Wellman CL; Nakazawa K. 2011. Chronic stress-induced hippocampal dendritic retraction requires CA3 NMDA receptors. Neuroscience 174:26-36. [PubMed: 21108993]  [MGI Ref ID J:170253]

Cravens CJ; Vargas-Pinto N; Christian KM; Nakazawa K. 2006. CA3 NMDA receptors are crucial for rapid and automatic representation of context memory. Eur J Neurosci 24(6):1771-80. [PubMed: 17004940]  [MGI Ref ID J:112944]

Cui Z; Lindl KA; Mei B; Zhang S; Tsien JZ. 2005. Requirement of NMDA receptor reactivation for consolidation and storage of nondeclarative taste memory revealed by inducible NR1 knockout. Eur J Neurosci 22(3):755-63. [PubMed: 16101757]  [MGI Ref ID J:100903]

Cui Z; Wang H; Tan Y; Zaia KA; Zhang S; Tsien JZ. 2004. Inducible and reversible NR1 knockout reveals crucial role of the NMDA receptor in preserving remote memories in the brain. Neuron 41(5):781-93. [PubMed: 15003177]  [MGI Ref ID J:88689]

Datwani A; Iwasato T; Itohara S; Erzurumlu RS. 2002. Lesion-induced thalamocortical axonal plasticity in the S1 cortex is independent of NMDA receptor function in excitatory cortical neurons. J Neurosci 22(21):9171-5. [PubMed: 12417641]  [MGI Ref ID J:123995]

Datwani A; Iwasato T; Itohara S; Erzurumlu RS. 2002. NMDA Receptor-Dependent Pattern Transfer from Afferents to Postsynaptic Cells and Dendritic Differentiation in the Barrel Cortex. Mol Cell Neurosci 21(3):477-92. [PubMed: 12498788]  [MGI Ref ID J:80900]

Fruhbeis C; Frohlich D; Kuo WP; Amphornrat J; Thilemann S; Saab AS; Kirchhoff F; Mobius W; Goebbels S; Nave KA; Schneider A; Simons M; Klugmann M; Trotter J; Kramer-Albers EM. 2013. Neurotransmitter-triggered transfer of exosomes mediates oligodendrocyte-neuron communication. PLoS Biol 11(7):e1001604. [PubMed: 23874151]  [MGI Ref ID J:201397]

Fukaya M; Kato A; Lovett C; Tonegawa S; Watanabe M. 2003. Retention of NMDA receptor NR2 subunits in the lumen of endoplasmic reticulum in targeted NR1 knockout mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100(8):4855-60. [PubMed: 12676993]  [MGI Ref ID J:83403]

Glass MJ; Hegarty DM; Oselkin M; Quimson L; South SM; Xu Q; Pickel VM; Inturrisi CE. 2008. Conditional deletion of the NMDA-NR1 receptor subunit gene in the central nucleus of the amygdala inhibits naloxone-induced conditioned place aversion in morphine-dependent mice. Exp Neurol 213(1):57-70. [PubMed: 18614169]  [MGI Ref ID J:138694]

Gray JA; Shi Y; Usui H; During MJ; Sakimura K; Nicoll RA. 2011. Distinct modes of AMPA receptor suppression at developing synapses by GluN2A and GluN2B: single-cell NMDA receptor subunit deletion in vivo. Neuron 71(6):1085-101. [PubMed: 21943605]  [MGI Ref ID J:178548]

Guo F; Maeda Y; Ko EM; Delgado M; Horiuchi M; Soulika A; Miers L; Burns T; Itoh T; Shen H; Lee E; Sohn J; Pleasure D. 2012. Disruption of NMDA Receptors in Oligodendroglial Lineage Cells Does Not Alter Their Susceptibility to Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis or Their Normal Development. J Neurosci 32(2):639-45. [PubMed: 22238099]  [MGI Ref ID J:179903]

Huerta PT; Sun LD; Wilson MA; Tonegawa S. 2000. Formation of temporal memory requires NMDA receptors within CA1 pyramidal neurons. Neuron 25(2):473-80. [PubMed: 10719900]  [MGI Ref ID J:60770]

Iwasato T; Datwani A; Wolf AM; Nishiyama H; Taguchi Y; Tonegawa S; Knopfel T; Erzurumlu RS; Itohara S. 2000. Cortex-restricted disruption of NMDAR1 impairs neuronal patterns in the barrel cortex. Nature 406(6797):726-31. [PubMed: 10963597]  [MGI Ref ID J:64064]

Jinde S; Belforte JE; Yamamoto J; Wilson MA; Tonegawa S; Nakazawa K. 2009. Lack of kainic acid-induced gamma oscillations predicts subsequent CA1 excitotoxic cell death. Eur J Neurosci 30(6):1036-55. [PubMed: 19735292]  [MGI Ref ID J:153511]

Li C; Niu W; Jiang CH; Hu Y. 2007. Effects of enriched environment on gene expression and signal pathways in cortex of hippocampal CA1 specific NMDAR1 knockout mice. Brain Res Bull 71(6):568-77. [PubMed: 17292799]  [MGI Ref ID J:124489]

Lin CW; Sim S; Ainsworth A; Okada M; Kelsch W; Lois C. 2010. Genetically increased cell-intrinsic excitability enhances neuronal integration into adult brain circuits. Neuron 65(1):32-9. [PubMed: 20152111]  [MGI Ref ID J:167660]

Liu T; Kong D; Shah BP; Ye C; Koda S; Saunders A; Ding JB; Yang Z; Sabatini BL; Lowell BB. 2012. Fasting activation of AgRP neurons requires NMDA receptors and involves spinogenesis and increased excitatory tone. Neuron 73(3):511-22. [PubMed: 22325203]  [MGI Ref ID J:182290]

Matsui A; Tran M; Yoshida AC; Kikuchi SS; U M; Ogawa M; Shimogori T. 2013. BTBD3 controls dendrite orientation toward active axons in mammalian neocortex. Science 342(6162):1114-8. [PubMed: 24179155]  [MGI Ref ID J:203420]

McHugh TJ; Blum KI; Tsien JZ; Tonegawa S; Wilson MA. 1996. Impaired hippocampal representation of space in CA1-specific NMDAR1 knockout mice [see comments] Cell 87(7):1339-49. [PubMed: 8980239]  [MGI Ref ID J:37456]

McHugh TJ; Jones MW; Quinn JJ; Balthasar N; Coppari R; Elmquist JK; Lowell BB; Fanselow MS; Wilson MA; Tonegawa S. 2007. Dentate gyrus NMDA receptors mediate rapid pattern separation in the hippocampal network. Science 317(5834):94-9. [PubMed: 17556551]  [MGI Ref ID J:122763]

McRoberts JA; Ennes HS; Marvizon JC; Fanselow MS; Mayer EA; Vissel B. 2011. Selective knockdown of NMDA receptors in primary afferent neurons decreases pain during phase 2 of the formalin test. Neuroscience 172:474-82. [PubMed: 20974228]  [MGI Ref ID J:170156]

Mei B; Li F; Gu Y; Cui Z; Tsien JZ. 2011. NMDA Receptors Are Not Required for Pattern Completion During Associative Memory Recall. PLoS One 6(4):e19326. [PubMed: 21559402]  [MGI Ref ID J:172343]

Moshal KS; Kumar M; Tyagi N; Mishra PK; Metreveli N; Rodriguez WE; Tyagi SC. 2009. Restoration of contractility in hyperhomocysteinemia by cardiac-specific deletion of NMDA-R1. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 296(3):H887-92. [PubMed: 19181966]  [MGI Ref ID J:146860]

Nakazawa K; Quirk MC; Chitwood RA; Watanabe M; Yeckel MF; Sun LD; Kato A; Carr CA; Johnston D; Wilson MA; Tonegawa S. 2002. Requirement for hippocampal CA3 NMDA receptors in associative memory recall. Science 297(5579):211-8. [PubMed: 12040087]  [MGI Ref ID J:77718]

Nakazawa K; Sun LD; Quirk MC; Rondi-Reig L; Wilson MA; Tonegawa S. 2003. Hippocampal CA3 NMDA receptors are crucial for memory acquisition of one-time experience. Neuron 38(2):305-15. [PubMed: 12718863]  [MGI Ref ID J:107692]

Ohtsuka N; Tansky MF; Kuang H; Kourrich S; Thomas MJ; Rubenstein JL; Ekker M; Leeman SE; Tsien JZ. 2008. Functional disturbances in the striatum by region-specific ablation of NMDA receptors. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105(35):12961-6. [PubMed: 18728179]  [MGI Ref ID J:139133]

Pagadala P; Park CK; Bang S; Xu ZZ; Xie RG; Liu T; Han BX; Tracey WD Jr; Wang F; Ji RR. 2013. Loss of NR1 Subunit of NMDARs in Primary Sensory Neurons Leads to Hyperexcitability and Pain Hypersensitivity: Involvement of Ca2+-Activated Small Conductance Potassium Channels. J Neurosci 33(33):13425-30. [PubMed: 23946399]  [MGI Ref ID J:200900]

Parker JG; Beutler LR; Palmiter RD. 2011. The Contribution of NMDA Receptor Signaling in the Corticobasal Ganglia Reward Network to Appetitive Pavlovian Learning. J Neurosci 31(31):11362-9. [PubMed: 21813695]  [MGI Ref ID J:174588]

Quintero GC; Erzurumlu RS; Vaccarino AL. 2007. Decreased pain response in mice following cortex-specific knockout of the N-methyl-D-aspartate NR1 subunit. Neurosci Lett 425(2):89-93. [PubMed: 17822844]  [MGI Ref ID J:145234]

Quintero GC; Erzurumlu RS; Vaccarino AL. 2008. Evaluation of morphine analgesia and motor coordination in mice following cortex-specific knockout of the N-methyl-d-aspartate NR1-subunit. Neurosci Lett 437(1):55-8. [PubMed: 18423864]  [MGI Ref ID J:136801]

Rampon C; Tang YP; Goodhouse J; Shimizu E; Kyin M; Tsien JZ. 2000. Enrichment induces structural changes and recovery from nonspatial memory deficits in CA1 NMDAR1-knockout mice [see comments] Nat Neurosci 3(3):238-44. [PubMed: 10700255]  [MGI Ref ID J:60730]

Rompala GR; Zsiros V; Zhang S; Kolata SM; Nakazawa K. 2013. Contribution of NMDA receptor hypofunction in prefrontal and cortical excitatory neurons to schizophrenia-like phenotypes. PLoS One 8(4):e61278. [PubMed: 23613827]  [MGI Ref ID J:200112]

Rondi-Reig L; Libbey M; Eichenbaum H; Tonegawa S. 2001. CA1-specific N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor knockout mice are deficient in solving a nonspatial transverse patterning task. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98(6):3543-8. [PubMed: 11248114]  [MGI Ref ID J:68059]

Rondi-Reig L; Petit GH; Tobin C; Tonegawa S; Mariani J; Berthoz A. 2006. Impaired sequential egocentric and allocentric memories in forebrain-specific-NMDA receptor knock-out mice during a new task dissociating strategies of navigation. J Neurosci 26(15):4071-81. [PubMed: 16611824]  [MGI Ref ID J:108400]

Sawtell NB; Frenkel MY; Philpot BD; Nakazawa K; Tonegawa S; Bear MF. 2003. NMDA Receptor-Dependent Ocular Dominance Plasticity in Adult Visual Cortex. Neuron 38(6):977-85. [PubMed: 12818182]  [MGI Ref ID J:84049]

Schmitz Y; Castagna C; Mrejeru A; Lizardi-Ortiz JE; Klein Z; Lindsley CW; Sulzer D. 2013. Glycine transporter-1 inhibition promotes striatal axon sprouting via NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons. J Neurosci 33(42):16778-89. [PubMed: 24133278]  [MGI Ref ID J:204688]

Shih PY; Savtchenko LP; Kamasawa N; Dembitskaya Y; McHugh TJ; Rusakov DA; Shigemoto R; Semyanov A. 2013. Retrograde synaptic signaling mediated by K+ efflux through postsynaptic NMDA receptors. Cell Rep 5(4):941-51. [PubMed: 24268779]  [MGI Ref ID J:206845]

Shimizu E; Tang YP; Rampon C; Tsien JZ. 2000. NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic reinforcement as a crucial process for memory consolidation. Science 290(5494):1170-4. [PubMed: 11073458]  [MGI Ref ID J:77659]

South SM; Kohno T; Kaspar BK; Hegarty D; Vissel B; Drake CT; Ohata M; Jenab S; Sailer AW; Malkmus S; Masuyama T; Horner P; Bogulavsky J; Gage FH; Yaksh TL; Woolf CJ; Heinemann SF; Inturrisi CE. 2003. A conditional deletion of the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor in adult spinal cord dorsal horn reduces NMDA currents and injury-induced pain. J Neurosci 23(12):5031-40. [PubMed: 12832526]  [MGI Ref ID J:84354]

Tashiro A; Sandler VM; Toni N; Zhao C; Gage FH. 2006. NMDA-receptor-mediated, cell-specific integration of new neurons in adult dentate gyrus. Nature 442(7105):929-33. [PubMed: 16906136]  [MGI Ref ID J:112227]

Tonegawa S; Tsien JZ; McHugh TJ; Huerta P; Blum KI; Wilson MA. 1996. Hippocampal CA1-region-restricted knockout of NMDAR1 gene disrupts synaptic plasticity, place fields, and spatial learning. Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biol 61:225-38. [PubMed: 9246451]  [MGI Ref ID J:41316]

Tsien JZ; Huerta PT; Tonegawa S. 1996. The essential role of hippocampal CA1 NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity in spatial memory [see comments] Cell 87(7):1327-38. [PubMed: 8980238]  [MGI Ref ID J:37457]

Ultanir SK; Kim JE; Hall BJ; Deerinck T; Ellisman M; Ghosh A. 2007. Regulation of spine morphology and spine density by NMDA receptor signaling in vivo. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104(49):19553-8. [PubMed: 18048342]  [MGI Ref ID J:141546]

Wang LP; Li F; Shen X; Tsien JZ. 2010. Conditional knockout of NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons prevents nicotine-conditioned place preference. PLoS One 5(1):e8616. [PubMed: 20062537]  [MGI Ref ID J:157245]

Wang LP; Li F; Wang D; Xie K; Wang D; Shen X; Tsien JZ. 2011. NMDA receptors in dopaminergic neurons are crucial for habit learning. Neuron 72(6):1055-66. [PubMed: 22196339]  [MGI Ref ID J:179986]

Wintzer ME; Boehringer R; Polygalov D; McHugh TJ. 2014. The hippocampal CA2 ensemble is sensitive to contextual change. J Neurosci 34(8):3056-66. [PubMed: 24553945]  [MGI Ref ID J:207462]

Wu Q; Clark MS; Palmiter RD. 2012. Deciphering a neuronal circuit that mediates appetite. Nature 483(7391):594-7. [PubMed: 22419158]  [MGI Ref ID J:182577]

Zhang ZW; Peterson M; Liu H. 2013. Essential role of postsynaptic NMDA receptors in developmental refinement of excitatory synapses. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110(3):1095-100. [PubMed: 23277569]  [MGI Ref ID J:193625]

Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Room Number           AX10

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryWhen maintaining a live colony, these mice are bred as homozygotes.
Mating SystemHomozygote x Homozygote         (Female x Male)   02-JUN-06
Diet Information LabDiet® 5K52/5K67

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $195.00Female or MaleHomozygous for Grin1tm2Stl  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$390.00Homozygous for Grin1tm2Stl x Homozygous for Grin1tm2Stl  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1500 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for both large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current demand for each strain. If a Repository strain is not immediately available, then within 2 to 3 business days, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order along with various delivery options. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age and will not exceed 12 weeks of age on the day of shipping. We will note and try to accommodate requests for specific ages of Repository strains but cannot guarantee provision of these strains at specific ages. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, please let us know.

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $253.50Female or MaleHomozygous for Grin1tm2Stl  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$507.00Homozygous for Grin1tm2Stl x Homozygous for Grin1tm2Stl  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1500 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for both large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current demand for each strain. If a Repository strain is not immediately available, then within 2 to 3 business days, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order along with various delivery options. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age and will not exceed 12 weeks of age on the day of shipping. We will note and try to accommodate requests for specific ages of Repository strains but cannot guarantee provision of these strains at specific ages. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, please let us know.

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Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1500 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for both large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current demand for each strain. If a Repository strain is not immediately available, then within 2 to 3 business days, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order along with various delivery options. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age and will not exceed 12 weeks of age on the day of shipping. We will note and try to accommodate requests for specific ages of Repository strains but cannot guarantee provision of these strains at specific ages. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, please let us know.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J (approximate)
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
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JAX® Services
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Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
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Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


For Licensing and Use Restrictions view the link(s) below:
- Use of MICE by companies or for-profit entities requires a license prior to shipping.

Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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