Strain Name:

B6.129P2-Prkcqtm1Litt/J

Stock Number:

005711

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Cryopreserved - Ready for recovery

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Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Specieslaboratory mouse
Generation?+N1p (25-DEC-05)
Generation Definitions
 
Donating InvestigatorDr. Dan R. Littman,   New York University Medical Center

Description
Mice homozygous for the targeted allele are viable, fertile, normal in size, and do not display any behavioral abnormalities. No endogenous or truncated protein product was detected in thymocytes or T cells. Mature T lymphocytes from null mice have blunted proliferative responses with decreased levels of both IL-2 and IL-2 receptor, and defective T cell receptor-initiated IkappaB-degradation/NF-kappaB activation. Homozygous mice exhibit severely impaired Th2, but normal Th1, immune responses as well as abnormal insulin signaling and glucose transport. Mutant mice also have defective regulatory T cell development (very low CD25 expression). This mutant may be suitable for use in studies related to T cell proliferation/signal transduction/immunodeficiency, Th2-mediated disease, asthma, and diabetes.

These mice have been found to also carry the Crb1rd8 allele.

Development
A targeting vector replaced the endogenous exon coding for the ATP-binding site of the kinase domain (amino acids 396-451) with the neomycin resistance gene. The construct was electroporated into the 129P2/OlaHsd-derived E14 embryonic stem (ES) cells. Correctly targeted ES cells were injected into C57BL/6 blastocysts. The resulting chimeric mice were bred to C57BL/6. Heterozygotes were backcrossed to C57BL/6 mice for 15 generations before being made homozygous.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying   Crb1rd8 allele
004852   B6;129-Crb1rd8/J
005304   C57BL/6NJ
001633   CXB12/HiAJ
000352   CXB2/ByJ
000353   CXB3/ByJ
000355   CXB5/ByJ
001630   CXB9/HiAJ
003392   STOCK Crb1rd8/J
View Strains carrying   Crb1rd8     (8 strains)

Strains carrying other alleles of Crb1
022521   C57BL/6NJ-Crb1rd8+em1Mvw/MvwJ
View Strains carrying other alleles of Crb1     (1 strain)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
- Potential model based on gene homology relationships. Phenotypic similarity to the human disease has not been tested.
Leber Congenital Amaurosis 8; LCA8   (CRB1)
Pigmented Paravenous Chorioretinal Atrophy; PPCRA   (CRB1)
Retinitis Pigmentosa 12; RP12   (CRB1)
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Prkcqtm1Litt/Prkcq+

        B6.129P2-Prkcqtm1Litt
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal neuromuscular synapse morphology
    • PMA-treated neurons with normal muscles and glia in the preparation fail to exhibit synapse loss unlike similarly treated wild-type muscles that is not as severe as in samples from homozygotes   (MGI Ref ID J:96919)

Prkcqtm1Litt/Prkcqtm1Litt

        B6.129P2-Prkcqtm1Litt
  • immune system phenotype
  • *normal* immune system phenotype
    • mice exhibit normal lung inflammation driven by Th1 cytokines   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
    • abnormal CD4-positive T cell physiology
      • accumulation of antigen-induced CD4 cells in lung draining lymph nodes during Th2 lung inflammation is decreased compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
      • abnormal T-helper 2 physiology
        • following ovalbumin challenge, production of Th2 cytokines (Il4, Il5, and Il13) compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
        • stimulated CD4 T cells exhibit impaired early Th2 and Th1 differentiation compared with similarly treated wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
    • abnormal T-helper 1 cell differentiation
      • Th1 stimulated T cells exhibit delayed differentiation and accumulation compared with similarly treated wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
      • however, Th1 cytokine production is normal in antigen airway challenge   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
    • decreased T cell proliferation
      • in mice immunized with ovalbumin in alum   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
      • however, proliferation of T cells in mice stimulated with ovalbumin and complete Freund's adjuvant is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
    • decreased interferon-gamma secretion
      • from CD4 T cells stimulated by anti-CD3, anti-CD28 antibodies but not when IL2 was present   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
      • from CD4 T cells from mice stimulated subcutaneously with ovalbumin and complete Freund's adjuvant   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
      • following induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)   (MGI Ref ID J:129421)
    • decreased interleukin-13 secretion
      • in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of ovalbumin challenged mice   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
    • decreased interleukin-17 secretion
      • following induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), splenocytes produce less IL17 compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:129421)
      • IL23-stimulated spleen cultures produce less IL17 compared with similarly treated wild-type cultures   (MGI Ref ID J:129421)
      • however, ovalbumin-stimulated splenocytes exhibit normal IL17 production   (MGI Ref ID J:129421)
    • decreased interleukin-2 secretion
      • from CD4 T cells from mice stimulated subcutaneously with ovalbumin and complete Freund's adjuvant   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
      • from splenocytes on day 14, but not day 21, following induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)   (MGI Ref ID J:129421)
    • decreased interleukin-4 secretion
      • in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of ovalbumin challenged mice   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
      • from CD4 T cells stimulated by anti-CD3, anti-CD28 antibodies with or without IL2   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
      • from CD4 T cells from mice stimulated with ovalbumin in alum   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
      • from splenocytes on day 14, but not day 21, following induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)   (MGI Ref ID J:129421)
    • decreased interleukin-5 secretion
      • in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of ovalbumin challenged mice   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
      • from CD4 T cells from mice stimulated with ovalbumin in alum   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
    • decreased splenocyte proliferation
      • on day 14, but not day 21, following induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)   (MGI Ref ID J:129421)
    • decreased susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
      • mice treated with MOG35-55 are completely resistance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induction (reduced inflammation, no demyelinating lesions, decreased production of Th1 cytokines IFN-gamma, IL2, and IL4, and IL17 production) compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:129421)
  • respiratory system phenotype
  • decreased airway responsiveness
    • mice exhibit attenuated methacholine sensitivity compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal endplate potential
    • following stimulation, myotubes fail to exhibit a decrement in endplate potential (EPP) amplitude unlike in similarly treated wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:96919)
    • following PMA treatment, muscles with wild-type nerves and glia or ventral spinal cord nerves with wild-type muscles and glia fail to exhibit a decrease in endplate amplitude compared with similarly treated wild-type muscles   (MGI Ref ID J:96919)
    • however, ventral spinal cord neurons treated with PMA and TTX exhibit a normal decrease in EPP amplitude   (MGI Ref ID J:96919)
  • abnormal nervous system development
    • developmental dennervation of polyinnervated neuromuscular junctions is delayed compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:96919)
  • abnormal neuromuscular synapse morphology
    • in a twitch assay, PMA-treated muscles even with normal nerves and glia in the preparation fail to exhibit synapse loss unlike similarly treated wild-type muscles   (MGI Ref ID J:96919)
    • in a twitch assay, PMA-treated neurons with normal muscles and glia in the preparation fail to exhibit synapse loss unlike similarly treated wild-type muscles   (MGI Ref ID J:96919)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • decreased physiological sensitivity to xenobiotic
    • mice exhibit attenuated methacholine sensitivity compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
    • ovalbumin-treated mice exhibit a reduction in accumulation of leukocytes, including eosinophils and lymphocytes, in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue, relatively normal bronchial epithelium, reduced mucus, and reduced Th2 cytokines compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal CD4-positive T cell physiology
    • accumulation of antigen-induced CD4 cells in lung draining lymph nodes during Th2 lung inflammation is decreased compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
    • abnormal T-helper 2 physiology
      • following ovalbumin challenge, production of Th2 cytokines (Il4, Il5, and Il13) compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
      • stimulated CD4 T cells exhibit impaired early Th2 and Th1 differentiation compared with similarly treated wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
  • abnormal T-helper 1 cell differentiation
    • Th1 stimulated T cells exhibit delayed differentiation and accumulation compared with similarly treated wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
    • however, Th1 cytokine production is normal in antigen airway challenge   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
  • decreased T cell proliferation
    • in mice immunized with ovalbumin in alum   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
    • however, proliferation of T cells in mice stimulated with ovalbumin and complete Freund's adjuvant is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:94285)
  • decreased splenocyte proliferation
    • on day 14, but not day 21, following induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)   (MGI Ref ID J:129421)
  • cellular phenotype
  • decreased splenocyte proliferation
    • on day 14, but not day 21, following induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)   (MGI Ref ID J:129421)

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Prkcqtm1Litt/Prkcqtm1Litt

        involves: 129P2/OlaHsd
  • immune system phenotype
  • *normal* immune system phenotype
    • mice mount a normal immune response to LCMV   (MGI Ref ID J:123989)
    • T cells exhibitnormal CD28 costimulation   (MGI Ref ID J:123989)
    • mice exhibit normal isotype switching and germinal center formation   (MGI Ref ID J:123989)
    • abnormal T cell activation
      • TCR-initiated NF-kappaB activation was absent in mature T lymphocytes, but intact in developing thymocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:83922)
      • decreased T cell proliferation
        • proliferation of T cells after stimulation with anti-CD3 mAb with or without anti-CD28 stimulation is reduced by more than 20-fold compared to wild-type T cells   (MGI Ref ID J:83922)
        • proliferation of T cells after anti-CD28 plus TPA (12-O-tetradacanoylphorbol-13-acetate) stimulation is reduced   (MGI Ref ID J:83922)
        • proliferation of T cells is reduced in mixed lymphocyte reactions   (MGI Ref ID J:83922)
        • T cell proliferation in response to a T-cell-dependent antigen, keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) is impaired   (MGI Ref ID J:83922)
        • in response to anti-CD3 stimulation   (MGI Ref ID J:123989)
        • however, CD28 costimulation is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:123989)
    • decreased interleukin-2 secretion
      • splenic T cell stimulated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 show a large reduction in the level of secreted IL-2   (MGI Ref ID J:83922)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal T cell activation
    • TCR-initiated NF-kappaB activation was absent in mature T lymphocytes, but intact in developing thymocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:83922)
    • decreased T cell proliferation
      • proliferation of T cells after stimulation with anti-CD3 mAb with or without anti-CD28 stimulation is reduced by more than 20-fold compared to wild-type T cells   (MGI Ref ID J:83922)
      • proliferation of T cells after anti-CD28 plus TPA (12-O-tetradacanoylphorbol-13-acetate) stimulation is reduced   (MGI Ref ID J:83922)
      • proliferation of T cells is reduced in mixed lymphocyte reactions   (MGI Ref ID J:83922)
      • T cell proliferation in response to a T-cell-dependent antigen, keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) is impaired   (MGI Ref ID J:83922)
      • in response to anti-CD3 stimulation   (MGI Ref ID J:123989)
      • however, CD28 costimulation is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:123989)

Prkcqtm1Litt/Prkcqtm1Litt

        involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal glucose homeostasis
    • lipid infusion does not alter insulin sensitivity, muscular and brown fat adipose tissue glucose uptake, or whole-body and muscular metabolic flux, including glycolysis and glycogen synthesis, unlike in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:92834)
    • increased insulin sensitivity
      • lipid infused mice do not exhibit a decrease in insulin sensitivity compared with similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:92834)
  • immune system phenotype
  • *normal* immune system phenotype
    • mice exhibit normal regulatory T cells-mediated inhibition of T cell activation, IL2-induced expansion of regulatory T cells, and regulatory T cells TGF-beta production   (MGI Ref ID J:141128)
    • abnormal effector T cell morphology
      • the ratio of CD4 to CD8 T cells is lower than in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:186080)
      • decreased CD4-positive T cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:186080)
      • decreased CD8-positive T cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:186080)
    • abnormal positive T cell selection
      • mildly impaired   (MGI Ref ID J:186080)
    • decreased DN1 thymic pro-T cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:186080)
    • decreased NK T cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:141128)
    • decreased T cell proliferation
      • when stimulated by anti-CD3 antibodies or antigens (in vitro and in vivo)   (MGI Ref ID J:186080)
    • increased T cell apoptosis
      • following CD3 and CD28 stimulation, T cell apoptosis is accelerated compared to in similarly treated wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:141128)
  • adipose tissue phenotype
  • abnormal adipocyte glucose uptake
    • lipid infusion does not alter brown adipose tissue glucose uptake unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:92834)
    • however, white adipose tissue glucose uptake is similarly decreased following lipid infusion as in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:92834)
  • muscle phenotype
  • abnormal muscle cell glucose uptake
    • lipid infusion does not alter muscle glucose uptake unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:92834)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal effector T cell morphology
    • the ratio of CD4 to CD8 T cells is lower than in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:186080)
    • decreased CD4-positive T cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:186080)
    • decreased CD8-positive T cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:186080)
  • abnormal positive T cell selection
    • mildly impaired   (MGI Ref ID J:186080)
  • decreased DN1 thymic pro-T cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:186080)
  • decreased NK T cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:141128)
  • decreased T cell proliferation
    • when stimulated by anti-CD3 antibodies or antigens (in vitro and in vivo)   (MGI Ref ID J:186080)
  • increased T cell apoptosis
    • following CD3 and CD28 stimulation, T cell apoptosis is accelerated compared to in similarly treated wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:141128)
  • cellular phenotype
  • increased T cell apoptosis
    • following CD3 and CD28 stimulation, T cell apoptosis is accelerated compared to in similarly treated wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:141128)
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • decreased DN1 thymic pro-T cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:186080)

Prkcqtm1Litt/Prkcqtm1Litt

        either: (involves: 129/Sv * 129P2/OlaHsd) or (involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6)
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal response to infection
    • following exposure to staphylococcal enterotoxin B, expansion and deletion of Vbeta8+CD4+ T cells is reduced compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:141930)
  • decreased T cell apoptosis
    • induced by Fas or staphylococcal enterotoxin B challenge   (MGI Ref ID J:141930)
    • however, IL2 restores Fas-mediated apoptosis   (MGI Ref ID J:141930)
  • decreased T cell proliferation
    • following exposure to staphylococcal enterotoxin B, expansion of Vbeta8+CD4+ T cells is reduced compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:141930)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • decreased T cell apoptosis
    • induced by Fas or staphylococcal enterotoxin B challenge   (MGI Ref ID J:141930)
    • however, IL2 restores Fas-mediated apoptosis   (MGI Ref ID J:141930)
  • decreased T cell proliferation
    • following exposure to staphylococcal enterotoxin B, expansion of Vbeta8+CD4+ T cells is reduced compared to in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:141930)
  • cellular phenotype
  • decreased T cell apoptosis
    • induced by Fas or staphylococcal enterotoxin B challenge   (MGI Ref ID J:141930)
    • however, IL2 restores Fas-mediated apoptosis   (MGI Ref ID J:141930)

Prkcqtm1Litt/Prkcqtm1Litt

        involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6J
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal platelet physiology
    • platelets exhibit reduced adhesion and degree of filopodia generation on fibrinogen-coated cover slips compared with wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:144254)
    • in mice, platelet exhibit a different distribution of filopodial number compared with wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:144254)
    • however, platelet adhesion and spreading on CRP or collagen are normal   (MGI Ref ID J:144254)
    • abnormal platelet activation
      • CRP platelet activation is enhanced compared to in wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:144254)
      • increased platelet aggregation
        • anti-coagulated blood passed over a collagen-coated cover slips forms larger thrombi compared with similarly treated wild-type blood   (MGI Ref ID J:144254)
    • abnormal platelet dense granule physiology
      • GPVI-dependent alpha-granule secretion is enhanced compared to in wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:144254)
      • however, ATP secretion induced by CRP or collagen is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:144254)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal platelet physiology
    • platelets exhibit reduced adhesion and degree of filopodia generation on fibrinogen-coated cover slips compared with wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:144254)
    • in mice, platelet exhibit a different distribution of filopodial number compared with wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:144254)
    • however, platelet adhesion and spreading on CRP or collagen are normal   (MGI Ref ID J:144254)
    • abnormal platelet activation
      • CRP platelet activation is enhanced compared to in wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:144254)
      • increased platelet aggregation
        • anti-coagulated blood passed over a collagen-coated cover slips forms larger thrombi compared with similarly treated wild-type blood   (MGI Ref ID J:144254)
    • abnormal platelet dense granule physiology
      • GPVI-dependent alpha-granule secretion is enhanced compared to in wild-type cells   (MGI Ref ID J:144254)
      • however, ATP secretion induced by CRP or collagen is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:144254)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Cell Biology Research
Signal Transduction

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
Immunodeficiency
      T cell deficiency
Inflammation
      Asthma
Intracellular Signaling Molecules
T Cell Receptor Signaling Defects

Research Tools
Diabetes and Obesity Research

Crb1rd8 related

Cell Biology Research
Defects in Cell Adhesion Molecules

Developmental Biology Research
Eye Defects

Sensorineural Research
Retinal Degeneration

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Prkcqtm1Litt
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Dan Littman
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Common Name(s) PKC-Theta-; PKCtheta-;
Mutation Made ByDr. Dan Littman,   New York University Medical Center
Strain of Origin129P2/OlaHsd
ES Cell Line NameE14
ES Cell Line Strain129P2/OlaHsd
Gene Symbol and Name Prkcq, protein kinase C, theta
Chromosome 2
Gene Common Name(s) A130035A12Rik; AW494342; PKC theta; PKC-0; PKC-theta; PKCtheta; PRKCT; Pkcq; RIKEN cDNA A130035A12 gene; expressed sequence AW494342; nPKC-theta;
Molecular Note The exon encoding the ATP-binding site of the kinase domain (aa 396 - 451) was replaced with a neo cassette inserted by homologous recombination. Protein was undetected in thymocytes or T cells obtained from mutant mice. [MGI Ref ID J:83922]
 
Allele Symbol Crb1rd8
Allele Name retinal degeneration 8
Allele Type Spontaneous
Common Name(s) Rd8-; nmf144;
Strain of OriginC57BL/6J
Gene Symbol and Name Crb1, crumbs homolog 1 (Drosophila)
Chromosome 1
Gene Common Name(s) 7530426H14Rik; A930008G09Rik; LCA8; RIKEN cDNA 7530426H14 gene; RIKEN cDNA A930008G09 gene; RP12;
Molecular Note The mutation in the rd8 mouse has been identified as a single base deletion in the Crb1 gene. This deletion causes a frame shift and a premature stop codon that truncates the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain of the protein. [MGI Ref ID J:85459]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Prkcqtm1Litt, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Sun Z; Arendt CW; Ellmeier W; Schaeffer EM; Sunshine MJ; Gandhi L; Annes J; Petrzilka D; Kupfer A; Schwartzberg PL; Littman DR. 2000. PKC-theta is required for TCR-induced NF-kappaB activation in mature but not immature T lymphocytes. Nature 404(6776):402-7. [PubMed: 10746729]  [MGI Ref ID J:83922]

Additional References

Crb1rd8 related

Aleman TS; Cideciyan AV; Aguirre GK; Huang WC; Mullins CL; Roman AJ; Sumaroka A; Olivares MB; Tsai FF; Schwartz SB; Vandenberghe LH; Limberis MP; Stone EM; Bell P; Wilson JM; Jacobson SG. 2011. Human CRB1-associated retinal degeneration: comparison with the rd8 Crb1-mutant mouse model. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 52(9):6898-910. [PubMed: 21757580]  [MGI Ref ID J:181396]

Barber AC; Hippert C; Duran Y; West EL; Bainbridge JW; Warre-Cornish K; Luhmann UF; Lakowski J; Sowden JC; Ali RR; Pearson RA. 2013. Repair of the degenerate retina by photoreceptor transplantation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110(1):354-9. [PubMed: 23248312]  [MGI Ref ID J:192521]

Chang B; Hawes NL; Hurd RE; Davisson MT; Nusinowitz S; Heckenlively JR. 2002. Retinal degeneration mutants in the mouse. Vision Res 42(4):517-25. [PubMed: 11853768]  [MGI Ref ID J:75095]

Chang B; Hawes NL; Hurd RE; Wang J; Howell D; Davisson MT; Roderick TH; Nusinowitz S; Heckenlively JR. 2005. Mouse models of ocular diseases. Vis Neurosci 22(5):587-93. [PubMed: 16332269]  [MGI Ref ID J:156373]

Chang B; Hurd R; Wang J; Nishina P. 2013. Survey of common eye diseases in laboratory mouse strains. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 54(7):4974-81. [PubMed: 23800770]  [MGI Ref ID J:198916]

Chen Y; Sawada O; Kohno H; Le YZ; Subauste C; Maeda T; Maeda A. 2013. Autophagy protects the retina from light-induced degeneration. J Biol Chem 288(11):7506-18. [PubMed: 23341467]  [MGI Ref ID J:196891]

Kohno H; Maeda T; Perusek L; Pearlman E; Maeda A. 2014. CCL3 production by microglial cells modulates disease severity in murine models of retinal degeneration. J Immunol 192(8):3816-27. [PubMed: 24639355]  [MGI Ref ID J:210001]

Lakowski J; Baron M; Bainbridge J; Barber AC; Pearson RA; Ali RR; Sowden JC. 2010. Cone and rod photoreceptor transplantation in models of the childhood retinopathy Leber congenital amaurosis using flow-sorted Crx-positive donor cells. Hum Mol Genet :. [PubMed: 20858907]  [MGI Ref ID J:165574]

Low BE; Krebs MP; Joung JK; Tsai SQ; Nishina PM; Wiles MV. 2014. Correction of the Crb1rd8 allele and retinal phenotype in C57BL/6N mice via TALEN-mediated homology-directed repair. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 55(1):387-95. [PubMed: 24346171]  [MGI Ref ID J:206789]

Luhmann UF; Carvalho LS; Robbie SJ; Cowing JA; Duran Y; Munro PM; Bainbridge JW; Ali RR. 2013. Ccl2, Cx3cr1 and Ccl2/Cx3cr1 chemokine deficiencies are not sufficient to cause age-related retinal degeneration. Exp Eye Res 107:80-7. [PubMed: 23232206]  [MGI Ref ID J:210432]

Mattapallil MJ; Wawrousek EF; Chan CC; Zhao H; Roychoudhury J; Ferguson TA; Caspi RR. 2012. The rd8 mutation of the Crb1 gene is present in vendor lines of C57BL/6N mice and embryonic stem cells, and confounds ocular induced mutant phenotypes. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci :. [PubMed: 22447858]  [MGI Ref ID J:182353]

Mehalow AK; Kameya S; Smith RS; Hawes NL; Denegre JM; Young JA; Bechtold L; Haider NB; Tepass U; Heckenlively JR; Chang B; Naggert JK; Nishina PM. 2003. CRB1 is essential for external limiting membrane integrity and photoreceptor morphogenesis in the mammalian retina. Hum Mol Genet 12(17):2179-89. [PubMed: 12915475]  [MGI Ref ID J:85459]

Mirza M; Volz C; Karlstetter M; Langiu M; Somogyi A; Ruonala MO; Tamm ER; Jagle H; Langmann T. 2013. Correction: Progressive Retinal Degeneration and Glial Activation in the CLN6 Mouse Model of Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis: A Beneficial Effect of DHA and Curcumin Supplementation. PLoS One 8(10):. [PubMed: 24130650]  [MGI Ref ID J:209126]

Perkins GA; Scott R; Perez A; Ellisman MH; Johnson JE; Fox DA. 2012. Bcl-xL-mediated remodeling of rod and cone synaptic mitochondria after postnatal lead exposure: electron microscopy, tomography and oxygen consumption. Mol Vis 18:3029-48. [PubMed: 23288995]  [MGI Ref ID J:192587]

Wang Y; Abu-Asab MS; Yu CR; Tang Z; Shen D; Tuo J; Li X; Chan CC. 2014. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-C inhibits neuroretinal apoptosis in a murine model of focal retinal degeneration. Lab Invest 94(6):674-82. [PubMed: 24709779]  [MGI Ref ID J:210964]

Won J; Shi LY; Hicks W; Wang J; Hurd R; Naggert JK; Chang B; Nishina PM. 2011. Mouse model resources for vision research. J Ophthalmol 2011:391384. [PubMed: 21052544]  [MGI Ref ID J:166679]

Zhang N; Kolesnikov AV; Jastrzebska B; Mustafi D; Sawada O; Maeda T; Genoud C; Engel A; Kefalov VJ; Palczewski K. 2013. Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa E150K opsin mice exhibit photoreceptor disorganization. J Clin Invest 123(1):121-37. [PubMed: 23221340]  [MGI Ref ID J:194158]

Prkcqtm1Litt related

Aguilo JI; Garaude J; Pardo J; Villalba M; Anel A. 2009. Protein kinase C-theta is required for NK cell activation and in vivo control of tumor progression. J Immunol 182(4):1972-81. [PubMed: 19201850]  [MGI Ref ID J:144801]

Anderson K; Fitzgerald M; Dupont M; Wang T; Paz N; Dorsch M; Healy A; Xu Y; Ocain T; Schopf L; Jaffee B; Picarella D. 2006. Mice deficient in PKC theta demonstrate impaired in vivo T cell activation and protection from T cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. Autoimmunity 39(6):469-78. [PubMed: 17060026]  [MGI Ref ID J:135925]

Barbarulo A; Grazioli P; Campese AF; Bellavia D; Di Mario G; Pelullo M; Ciuffetta A; Colantoni S; Vacca A; Frati L; Gulino A; Felli MP; Screpanti I. 2011. Notch3 and Canonical NF-{kappa}B Signaling Pathways Cooperatively Regulate Foxp3 Transcription. J Immunol 186(11):6199-206. [PubMed: 21508258]  [MGI Ref ID J:173214]

Barouch-Bentov R; Lemmens EE; Hu J; Janssen EM; Droin NM; Song J; Schoenberger SP; Altman A. 2005. Protein kinase C-theta is an early survival factor required for differentiation of effector CD8+ T cells. J Immunol 175(8):5126-34. [PubMed: 16210616]  [MGI Ref ID J:119122]

Berg-Brown NN; Gronski MA; Jones RG; Elford AR; Deenick EK; Odermatt B; Littman DR; Ohashi PS. 2004. PKCtheta signals activation versus tolerance in vivo. J Exp Med 199(6):743-52. [PubMed: 15024044]  [MGI Ref ID J:123989]

Bertram A; Zhang H; von Vietinghoff S; de Pablo C; Haller H; Shushakova N; Ley K. 2012. Protein kinase C-theta is required for murine neutrophil recruitment and adhesion strengthening under flow. J Immunol 188(8):4043-51. [PubMed: 22403440]  [MGI Ref ID J:184084]

Bhavanasi D; Kim S; Goldfinger LE; Kunapuli SP. 2011. Protein kinase Cdelta mediates the activation of protein kinase D2 in platelets. Biochem Pharmacol 82(7):720-7. [PubMed: 21736870]  [MGI Ref ID J:176476]

Cannons JL; Wu JZ; Gomez-Rodriguez J; Zhang J; Dong B; Liu Y; Shaw S; Siminovitch KA; Schwartzberg PL. 2010. Biochemical and genetic evidence for a SAP-PKC-theta interaction contributing to IL-4 regulation. J Immunol 185(5):2819-27. [PubMed: 20668219]  [MGI Ref ID J:163263]

Cho JH; Kim HO; Kim KS; Yang DH; Surh CD; Sprent J. 2013. Unique features of naive CD8+ T cell activation by IL-2. J Immunol 191(11):5559-73. [PubMed: 24166977]  [MGI Ref ID J:207012]

Cohen S; Braiman A; Shubinsky G; Ohayon A; Altman A; Isakov N. 2009. PKCtheta is required for hemostasis and positive regulation of thrombin-induced platelet aggregation and alpha-granule secretion. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 385(1):22-7. [PubMed: 19433059]  [MGI Ref ID J:150589]

Deenick EK; Elford AR; Pellegrini M; Hall H; Mak TW; Ohashi PS. 2010. c-Rel but not NF-kappaB1 is important for T regulatory cell development. Eur J Immunol 40(3):677-681. [PubMed: 20082358]  [MGI Ref ID J:157761]

Deenick EK; Po L; Chapatte L; Murakami K; Lu YC; Elford AR; Saibil SD; Ruland J; Gerondakis S; Mak TW; Ohashi PS. 2009. c-Rel phenocopies PKCtheta but not Bcl-10 in regulating CD8(+) T-cell activation versus tolerance. Eur J Immunol 40(3):867-877. [PubMed: 19950170]  [MGI Ref ID J:157735]

Fang X; Wang R; Ma J; Ding Y; Shang W; Sun Z. 2012. Ameliorated ConA-induced hepatitis in the absence of PKC-theta. PLoS One 7(2):e31174. [PubMed: 22347449]  [MGI Ref ID J:185232]

Fauconnier M; Bourigault ML; Meme S; Szeremeta F; Palomo J; Danneels A; Charron S; Fick L; Jacobs M; Beloeil JC; Ryffel B; Quesniaux VF. 2011. Protein kinase C-theta is required for development of experimental cerebral malaria. Am J Pathol 178(1):212-21. [PubMed: 21224058]  [MGI Ref ID J:168090]

Felli MP; Vacca A; Calce A; Bellavia D; Campese AF; Grillo R; Di Giovine M; Checquolo S; Talora C; Palermo R; Di Mario G; Frati L; Gulino A; Screpanti I. 2005. PKC theta mediates pre-TCR signaling and contributes to Notch3-induced T-cell leukemia. Oncogene 24(6):992-1000. [PubMed: 15592506]  [MGI Ref ID J:96010]

Fu G; Hu J; Niederberger-Magnenat N; Rybakin V; Casas J; Yachi PP; Feldstein S; Ma B; Hoerter JA; Ampudia J; Rigaud S; Lambolez F; Gavin AL; Sauer K; Cheroutre H; Gascoigne NR. 2011. Protein kinase C eta is required for T cell activation and homeostatic proliferation. Sci Signal 4(202):ra84. [PubMed: 22155788]  [MGI Ref ID J:186080]

Gao Z; Wang Z; Zhang X; Butler AA; Zuberi A; Gawronska-Kozak B; Lefevre M; York D; Ravussin E; Berthoud HR; McGuinness O; Cefalu WT; Ye J. 2007. Inactivation of PKCtheta leads to increased susceptibility to obesity and dietary insulin resistance in mice. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 292(1):E84-91. [PubMed: 16896164]  [MGI Ref ID J:116970]

Garaude J; Kaminski S; Charni S; Aguilo JI; Jacquet C; Plays M; Hernandez J; Rodriguez F; Hipskind RA; Anel A; Villalba M. 2008. Impaired anti-leukemic immune response in PKCtheta-deficient mice. Mol Immunol 45(12):3463-9. [PubMed: 18462800]  [MGI Ref ID J:137698]

Giannoni F; Lyon AB; Wareing MD; Dias PB; Sarawar SR. 2005. Protein kinase C theta is not essential for T-cell-mediated clearance of murine gammaherpesvirus 68. J Virol 79(11):6808-13. [PubMed: 15890920]  [MGI Ref ID J:98390]

Gupta S; Manicassamy S; Vasu C; Kumar A; Shang W; Sun Z. 2008. Differential requirement of PKC-theta in the development and function of natural regulatory T cells. Mol Immunol :. [PubMed: 18842300]  [MGI Ref ID J:141128]

Haarberg KM; Li J; Heinrichs J; Wang D; Liu C; Bronk CC; Kaosaard K; Owyang AM; Holland S; Masuda E; Tso K; Blazar BR; Anasetti C; Beg AA; Yu XZ. 2013. Pharmacologic inhibition of PKCalpha and PKCtheta prevents GVHD while preserving GVL activity in mice. Blood 122(14):2500-11. [PubMed: 23908466]  [MGI Ref ID J:203281]

Hall KJ; Harper MT; Gilio K; Cosemans JM; Heemskerk JW; Poole AW. 2008. Genetic analysis of the role of protein kinase Ctheta in platelet function and thrombus formation. PLoS ONE 3(9):e3277. [PubMed: 18815612]  [MGI Ref ID J:144254]

Healy AM; Izmailova E; Fitzgerald M; Walker R; Hattersley M; Silva M; Siebert E; Terkelsen J; Picarella D; Pickard MD; LeClair B; Chandra S; Jaffee B. 2006. PKC-theta-deficient mice are protected from Th1-dependent antigen-induced arthritis. J Immunol 177(3):1886-93. [PubMed: 16849501]  [MGI Ref ID J:138362]

Kim JK; Fillmore JJ; Sunshine MJ; Albrecht B; Higashimori T; Kim DW; Liu ZX; Soos TJ; Cline GW; O'Brien WR; Littman DR; Shulman GI. 2004. PKC-theta knockout mice are protected from fat-induced insulin resistance. J Clin Invest 114(6):823-7. [PubMed: 15372106]  [MGI Ref ID J:92834]

Kingeter LM; Schaefer BC. 2008. Loss of protein kinase Ctheta, Bcl10, or Malt1 selectively impairs proliferation and NF-kappaB activation in the CD4+ T cell subset. J Immunol 181(9):6244-54. [PubMed: 18941215]  [MGI Ref ID J:140730]

Kitaura J; Eto K; Kinoshita T; Kawakami Y; Leitges M; Lowell CA; Kawakami T. 2005. Regulation of highly cytokinergic IgE-induced mast cell adhesion by Src, Syk, Tec, and protein kinase C family kinases. J Immunol 174(8):4495-504. [PubMed: 15814670]  [MGI Ref ID J:98164]

Kong KF; Yokosuka T; Canonigo-Balancio AJ; Isakov N; Saito T; Altman A. 2011. A motif in the V3 domain of the kinase PKC-theta determines its localization in the immunological synapse and functions in T cells via association with CD28. Nat Immunol 12(11):1105-12. [PubMed: 21964608]  [MGI Ref ID J:177663]

Kwon MJ; Ma J; Ding Y; Wang R; Sun Z. 2012. Protein kinase C-theta promotes Th17 differentiation via upregulation of Stat3. J Immunol 188(12):5887-97. [PubMed: 22586032]  [MGI Ref ID J:188872]

Lanuza MA; Besalduch N; Gonzalez C; Santafe MM; Garcia N; Tomas M; Nelson PG; Tomas J. 2010. Decreased phosphorylation of delta and epsilon subunits of the acetylcholine receptor coincides with delayed postsynaptic maturation in PKC theta deficient mouse. Exp Neurol 225(1):183-95. [PubMed: 20599977]  [MGI Ref ID J:163551]

Li MX; Jia M; Yang LX; Jiang H; Lanuza MA; Gonzalez CM; Nelson PG. 2004. The role of the theta isoform of protein kinase C (PKC) in activity-dependent synapse elimination: evidence from the PKC theta knock-out mouse in vivo and in vitro. J Neurosci 24(15):3762-9. [PubMed: 15084656]  [MGI Ref ID J:96919]

Ma JS; Monu N; Shen DT; Mecklenbrauker I; Radoja N; Haydar TF; Leitges M; Frey AB; Vukmanovic S; Radoja S. 2007. Protein kinase Cdelta regulates antigen receptor-induced lytic granule polarization in mouse CD8+ CTL. J Immunol 178(12):7814-21. [PubMed: 17548619]  [MGI Ref ID J:148586]

Madaro L; Marrocco V; Carnio S; Sandri M; Bouche M. 2013. Intracellular signaling in ER stress-induced autophagy in skeletal muscle cells. FASEB J 27(5):1990-2000. [PubMed: 23388382]  [MGI Ref ID J:197854]

Madaro L; Marrocco V; Fiore P; Aulino P; Smeriglio P; Adamo S; Molinaro M; Bouche M. 2011. PKCtheta signaling is required for myoblast fusion by regulating the expression of caveolin-3 and beta1D integrin upstream focal adhesion kinase. Mol Biol Cell 22(8):1409-19. [PubMed: 21346196]  [MGI Ref ID J:182987]

Manicassamy S; Gupta S; Huang Z; Sun Z. 2006. Protein kinase C-theta-mediated signals enhance CD4+ T cell survival by up-regulating Bcl-xL. J Immunol 176(11):6709-16. [PubMed: 16709830]  [MGI Ref ID J:131799]

Manicassamy S; Sadim M; Ye RD; Sun Z. 2006. Differential roles of PKC-theta in the regulation of intracellular calcium concentration in primary T cells. J Mol Biol 355(3):347-59. [PubMed: 16309697]  [MGI Ref ID J:104839]

Manicassamy S; Sun Z. 2007. The critical role of protein kinase C-theta in Fas/Fas ligand-mediated apoptosis. J Immunol 178(1):312-9. [PubMed: 17182568]  [MGI Ref ID J:141930]

Manicassamy S; Yin D; Zhang Z; Molinero LL; Alegre ML; Sun Z. 2008. A critical role for protein kinase C-theta-mediated T cell survival in cardiac allograft rejection. J Immunol 181(1):513-20. [PubMed: 18566417]  [MGI Ref ID J:137414]

Marsland BJ; Nembrini C; Grun K; Reissmann R; Kurrer M; Leipner C; Kopf M. 2007. TLR ligands act directly upon T cells to restore proliferation in the absence of protein kinase C-theta signaling and promote autoimmune myocarditis. J Immunol 178(6):3466-73. [PubMed: 17339441]  [MGI Ref ID J:144290]

Marsland BJ; Nembrini C; Schmitz N; Abel B; Krautwald S; Bachmann MF; Kopf M. 2005. Innate signals compensate for the absence of PKC-{theta} during in vivo CD8(+) T cell effector and memory responses. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102(40):14374-9. [PubMed: 16186501]  [MGI Ref ID J:101399]

Marsland BJ; Soos TJ; Spath G; Littman DR; Kopf M. 2004. Protein kinase C theta is critical for the development of in vivo T helper (Th)2 cell but not Th1 cell responses. J Exp Med 200(2):181-9. [PubMed: 15263025]  [MGI Ref ID J:100165]

Morley SC; Weber KS; Kao H; Allen PM. 2008. Protein kinase C-theta is required for efficient positive selection. J Immunol 181(7):4696-708. [PubMed: 18802072]  [MGI Ref ID J:141447]

Nagahama K; Ogawa A; Shirane K; Shimomura Y; Sugimoto K; Mizoguchi A. 2008. Protein kinase C theta plays a fundamental role in different types of chronic colitis. Gastroenterology 134(2):459-69. [PubMed: 18155708]  [MGI Ref ID J:135589]

Nagy B Jr; Bhavaraju K; Getz T; Bynagari YS; Kim S; Kunapuli SP. 2009. Impaired activation of platelets lacking protein kinase C-theta isoform. Blood 113(11):2557-67. [PubMed: 19164598]  [MGI Ref ID J:146520]

Nishanth G; Sakowicz-Burkiewicz M; Handel U; Kliche S; Wang X; Naumann M; Deckert M; Schluter D. 2010. Protective Toxoplasma gondii-specific T-cell responses require T-cell-specific expression of protein kinase C-theta. Infect Immun 78(8):3454-64. [PubMed: 20498263]  [MGI Ref ID J:161695]

Ohayon A; Golenser J; Sinay R; Tamir A; Altman A; Pollack Y; Isakov N. 2010. Protein Kinase C {theta} Deficiency Increases Resistance of C57BL/6J Mice to Plasmodium berghei Infection-Induced Cerebral Malaria. Infect Immun 78(10):4195-205. [PubMed: 20660606]  [MGI Ref ID J:164251]

Pagan AJ; Pepper M; Chu HH; Green JM; Jenkins MK. 2012. CD28 promotes CD4+ T cell clonal expansion during infection independently of its YMNM and PYAP motifs. J Immunol 189(6):2909-17. [PubMed: 22896637]  [MGI Ref ID J:189943]

Page KM; Chaudhary D; Goldman SJ; Kasaian MT. 2008. Natural killer cells from protein kinase C theta-/- mice stimulated with interleukin-12 are deficient in production of interferon-gamma. J Leukoc Biol 83(5):1267-76. [PubMed: 18263766]  [MGI Ref ID J:134459]

Park SG; Schulze-Luehrman J; Hayden MS; Hashimoto N; Ogawa W; Kasuga M; Ghosh S. 2009. The kinase PDK1 integrates T cell antigen receptor and CD28 coreceptor signaling to induce NF-kappaB and activate T cells. Nat Immunol 10(2):158-66. [PubMed: 19122654]  [MGI Ref ID J:144512]

Qiao G; Li Z; Molinero L; Alegre ML; Ying H; Sun Z; Penninger JM; Zhang J. 2008. T-cell receptor-induced NF-kappaB activation is negatively regulated by E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b. Mol Cell Biol 28(7):2470-80. [PubMed: 18227156]  [MGI Ref ID J:134206]

Sakowicz-Burkiewicz M; Nishanth G; Helmuth U; Drogemuller K; Busch DH; Utermohlen O; Naumann M; Deckert M; Schluter D. 2008. Protein kinase C-theta critically regulates the proliferation and survival of pathogen-specific T cells in murine listeriosis. J Immunol 180(8):5601-12. [PubMed: 18390745]  [MGI Ref ID J:134249]

Salek-Ardakani S; So T; Halteman BS; Altman A; Croft M. 2004. Differential regulation of Th2 and Th1 lung inflammatory responses by protein kinase C theta. J Immunol 173(10):6440-7. [PubMed: 15528385]  [MGI Ref ID J:94285]

Salek-Ardakani S; So T; Halteman BS; Altman A; Croft M. 2005. Protein kinase Ctheta controls Th1 cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. J Immunol 175(11):7635-41. [PubMed: 16301673]  [MGI Ref ID J:122151]

Sanchez-Lockhart M; Miller J. 2006. Engagement of CD28 outside of the immunological synapse results in up-regulation of IL-2 mRNA stability but not IL-2 transcription. J Immunol 176(8):4778-84. [PubMed: 16585571]  [MGI Ref ID J:131187]

Sims TN; Soos TJ; Xenias HS; Dubin-Thaler B; Hofman JM; Waite JC; Cameron TO; Thomas VK; Varma R; Wiggins CH; Sheetz MP; Littman DR; Dustin ML. 2007. Opposing effects of PKCtheta and WASp on symmetry breaking and relocation of the immunological synapse. Cell 129(4):773-85. [PubMed: 17512410]  [MGI Ref ID J:143627]

So T; Soroosh P; Eun SY; Altman A; Croft M. 2011. Antigen-independent signalosome of CARMA1, PKC{theta}, and TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) determines NF-{kappa}B signaling in T cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108(7):2903-8. [PubMed: 21282629]  [MGI Ref ID J:169068]

Soriani A; Moran B; de Virgilio M; Kawakami T; Altman A; Lowell C; Eto K; Shattil SJ. 2006. A role for PKCtheta in outside-in alpha(IIb)beta3 signaling. J Thromb Haemost 4(3):648-55. [PubMed: 16460447]  [MGI Ref ID J:135793]

Stanic AK; Bezbradica JS; Park JJ; Van Kaer L; Boothby MR; Joyce S. 2004. Cutting edge: the ontogeny and function of Va14Ja18 natural T lymphocytes require signal processing by protein kinase C theta and NF-kappa B. J Immunol 172(8):4667-71. [PubMed: 15067039]  [MGI Ref ID J:89129]

Stevens L; Htut TM; White D; Li X; Hanidu A; Stearns C; Labadia ME; Li J; Brown M; Yang J. 2006. Involvement of GATA3 in protein kinase C theta-induced Th2 cytokine expression. Eur J Immunol 36(12):3305-14. [PubMed: 17111354]  [MGI Ref ID J:117083]

Tan SL; Zhao J; Bi C; Chen XC; Hepburn DL; Wang J; Sedgwick JD; Chintalacharuvu SR; Na S. 2006. Resistance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and impaired IL-17 production in protein kinase C theta-deficient mice. J Immunol 176(5):2872-9. [PubMed: 16493044]  [MGI Ref ID J:129421]

Tassi I; Cella M; Presti R; Colucci A; Gilfillan S; Littman DR; Colonna M. 2008. NK cell-activating receptors require PKC-theta for sustained signaling, transcriptional activation, and IFN-gamma secretion. Blood 112(10):4109-16. [PubMed: 18784374]  [MGI Ref ID J:142532]

Valenzuela JO; Iclozan C; Hossain MS; Prlic M; Hopewell E; Bronk CC; Wang J; Celis E; Engelman RW; Blazar BR; Bevan MJ; Waller EK; Yu XZ; Beg AA. 2009. PKCtheta is required for alloreactivity and GVHD but not for immune responses toward leukemia and infection in mice. J Clin Invest 119(12):3774-86. [PubMed: 19907075]  [MGI Ref ID J:155103]

Wang C; Liu M; Riojas RA; Xin X; Gao Z; Zeng R; Wu J; Dong LQ; Liu F. 2009. Protein kinase C theta (PKCtheta)-dependent phosphorylation of PDK1 at Ser504 and Ser532 contributes to palmitate-induced insulin resistance. J Biol Chem 284(4):2038-44. [PubMed: 19047061]  [MGI Ref ID J:146938]

Zhang JX; Diehl GE; Littman DR. 2008. Relief of preintegration inhibition and characterization of additional blocks for HIV replication in primary mouse T cells. PLoS ONE 3(4):e2035. [PubMed: 18446227]  [MGI Ref ID J:134637]

dos Santos NR; Rickman DS; de Reynies A; Cormier F; Williame M; Blanchard C; Stern MH; Ghysdael J. 2007. Pre-TCR expression cooperates with TEL-JAK2 to transform immature thymocytes and induce T-cell leukemia. Blood 109(9):3972-81. [PubMed: 17192390]  [MGI Ref ID J:121496]

Health & husbandry

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryWhen maintaining a live colony, these mice are maintained as homozygotes. Recommend specific pathogen free vivarium as homozygotes are T cell immunodeficient.

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $2525.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Frozen Products

Price (US dollars $)
Frozen Embryo $1650.00

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryopreserved Embryos
    Available to most shipping destinations1
    This strain is also available as cryopreserved embryos2. Orders for cryopreserved embryos may be placed with our Customer Service Department. Experienced technicians at The Jackson Laboratory have recovered frozen embryos of this strain successfully. We will provide you enough embryos to perform two embryo transfers. The Jackson Laboratory does not guarantee successful recovery at your facility. For complete information on purchasing embryos, please visit our Cryopreserved Embryos web page.

    1 Shipments cannot be made to Australia due to Australian government import restrictions.
    2 Embryos for most strains are cryopreserved at the two cell stage while some strains are cryopreserved at the eight cell stage. If this information is important to you, please contact Customer Service.
  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3283.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Frozen Products

Price (US dollars $)
Frozen Embryo $2145.00

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryopreserved Embryos
    Available to most shipping destinations1
    This strain is also available as cryopreserved embryos2. Orders for cryopreserved embryos may be placed with our Customer Service Department. Experienced technicians at The Jackson Laboratory have recovered frozen embryos of this strain successfully. We will provide you enough embryos to perform two embryo transfers. The Jackson Laboratory does not guarantee successful recovery at your facility. For complete information on purchasing embryos, please visit our Cryopreserved Embryos web page.

    1 Shipments cannot be made to Australia due to Australian government import restrictions.
    2 Embryos for most strains are cryopreserved at the two cell stage while some strains are cryopreserved at the eight cell stage. If this information is important to you, please contact Customer Service.
  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

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The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
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JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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