Strain Name:

NOD.129S6(B6)-Del(3Cd1d2-Cd1d1)1Sbp/SbwJ

Stock Number:

006330

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Common Names: CD1d-/- NOD;     NOD.CD1d KO;     NOD.CD1d-/-;     CD1d-null NOD;    

Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Former Names NOD.129S6(B6)-Cd1d1/Cd1d2tm1Spb/SbwJ    (Changed: 15-SEP-14 )
NOD.129S2(B6)-Cd1d1/Cd1d2tm1Spb/SbwJ    (Changed: 14-APR-11 )
NOD.129S2(B6)-Cd1d1/Cd1d2tm1Stst/SbwJ    (Changed: 19-OCT-06 )
Type Deletion;
Additional information on Mice with Chromosomal Aberrations.
Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Specieslaboratory mouse
H2 Haplotypeg7
GenerationN11F?+F2p
Generation Definitions
 
Donating InvestigatorDr. S. Brian Wilson,   University of Florida

Description
Cd1d1/Cd1d2tm1Stst homozygous NOD congenic mice are viable, fertile, normal in size, and do not display any gross physical or behavioral abnormalities. The lack of CD1d expression on APC in homozygous mice was confirmed by FACS analysis. FACS analysis results also showed when compared to wildtype or heterozygous cohorts that CD1d deficient mice are characterized by a marked loss of NKT cells in spleen, pancreatic lymph nodes and pancreas; while there is an increase in the proportion of conventional T cells expressing CD25 and CD44 indicative of a memory phenotype. Conventional splenic T cells from wildtype or Cd1d deficient mice challenged with autoantigen GAD2 show no difference in proliferation or IL4, IFN-y and IL12 secretion. 50% of 15 week old Cd1d deficient mice are diabetic compared with 0% of wildtype controls and by 32 weeks of age 82% of the CD1d deficient mice are diabetic compared to 56% of the wildtype controls.

This stock is useful in the study of Cd1d function in autoimmunity and peripheral tolerance.

Development
CD1d located on Chromosome 3, 48cM is a nonpolymorphic class Ib protein expressed on the surface of antigen presenting cells. The function of CD1d is to present lipid based antigens to natural killer (NK) T cells. The alleles of interest in this NOD congenic stock are functionally inactivated variants of Cd1d1 and the adjacent Cd1d2 gene. After 11 backcrosses to NOD the size of the 129 derived congenic interval containing the inactivated CD1d gene was <1cM.

Control Information

  Control
   001976 NOD/ShiLtJ
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying   Del(3Cd1d2-Cd1d1)1Sbp allele
008881   B6.129S6-Del(3Cd1d2-Cd1d1)1Sbp/J
View Strains carrying   Del(3Cd1d2-Cd1d1)1Sbp     (1 strain)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

Currently there is no phenotype information for this strain.

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Del(3Cd1d2-Cd1d1)1Sbp
Allele Name deletion, Chr3, Steven P Balk 1
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Common Name(s) CD1 KO; CD1d KO; CD1d-; CD1dnull; Cd1d1/Cd1d2tm1Spb; Cd1d1/Cd1d2tm1Stst;
Strain of Origin129S6/SvEvTac
ES Cell Line NameTC1/TC-1
ES Cell Line Strain129S6/SvEvTac
Gene Symbol and Name Del(3Cd1d2-Cd1d1)1Sbp, deletion, Chr3, Steven P Balk 1
Chromosome 3
Molecular Note A genomic region containing Cd1d1 and Cd1d2 genes was replaced with a single neomycin cassette by homologous recombination. [MGI Ref ID J:106350]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Cd1d1/Cd1d2tm1Spb, Separated PCR
Cd1d1/Cd1d2tm1Spb, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Additional References

Del(3Cd1d2-Cd1d1)1Sbp related

Arrenberg P; Halder R; Dai Y; Maricic I; Kumar V. 2010. Oligoclonality and innate-like features in the TCR repertoire of type II NKT cells reactive to a beta-linked self-glycolipid. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107(24):10984-9. [PubMed: 20534460]  [MGI Ref ID J:161277]

Bharhani MS; Chiu B; Na KS; Inman RD. 2009. Activation of invariant NKT cells confers protection against Chlamydia trachomatis-induced arthritis. Int Immunol 21(7):859-70. [PubMed: 19477915]  [MGI Ref ID J:150284]

Boyton R. 2008. The role of natural killer T cells in lung inflammation. J Pathol 214(2):276-82. [PubMed: 18161753]  [MGI Ref ID J:130987]

Brigl M; Tatituri RV; Watts GF; Bhowruth V; Leadbetter EA; Barton N; Cohen NR; Hsu FF; Besra GS; Brenner MB. 2011. Innate and cytokine-driven signals, rather than microbial antigens, dominate in natural killer T cell activation during microbial infection. J Exp Med 208(6):1163-77. [PubMed: 21555485]  [MGI Ref ID J:177293]

Broxmeyer HE; Christopherson K; Hangoc G; Cooper S; Mantel C; Renukaradhya GJ; Brutkiewicz RR. 2012. CD1d expression on and regulation of murine hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Blood 119(24):5731-41. [PubMed: 22535665]  [MGI Ref ID J:188651]

Chiba A; Cohen N; Brigl M; Brennan PJ; Besra GS; Brenner MB. 2009. Rapid and reliable generation of invariant natural killer T-cell lines in vitro. Immunology 128(3):324-33. [PubMed: 20067532]  [MGI Ref ID J:162280]

Chu X; Kilpatrick E; Xiao X; Liu W; Demirci G; Exley M; Li XC. 2011. Islet allograft tolerance in the absence of invariant natural killer T cells. Clin Immunol 141(3):268-72. [PubMed: 21996456]  [MGI Ref ID J:178528]

Corr M; Crain B. 2002. The role of FcgammaR signaling in the K/B x N serum transfer model of arthritis. J Immunol 169(11):6604-9. [PubMed: 12444173]  [MGI Ref ID J:124384]

Cripps JG; Celaj S; Burdick M; Strieter RM; Gorham JD. 2012. Liver inflammation in a mouse model of Th1 hepatitis despite the absence of invariant NKT cells or the Th1 chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5. Lab Invest 92(10):1461-71. [PubMed: 22906987]  [MGI Ref ID J:189898]

Devera TS; Shah HB; Lang GA; Lang ML. 2008. Glycolipid-activated NKT cells support the induction of persistent plasma cell responses and antibody titers. Eur J Immunol 38(4):1001-11. [PubMed: 18350547]  [MGI Ref ID J:133784]

Dieude M; Striegl H; Tyznik AJ; Wang J; Behar SM; Piccirillo CA; Levine JS; Zajonc DM; Rauch J. 2011. Cardiolipin binds to CD1d and stimulates CD1d-restricted gammadelta T cells in the normal murine repertoire. J Immunol 186(8):4771-81. [PubMed: 21389252]  [MGI Ref ID J:172464]

Driver JP; Scheuplein F; Chen YG; Grier AE; Wilson SB; Serreze DV. 2010. Invariant natural killer T-cell control of type 1 diabetes: a dendritic cell genetic decision of a silver bullet or Russian roulette. Diabetes 59(2):423-32. [PubMed: 19903740]  [MGI Ref ID J:164162]

Exley MA; Bigley NJ; Cheng O; Shaulov A; Tahir SM; Carter QL; Garcia J; Wang C; Patten K; Stills HF; Alt FW; Snapper SB; Balk SP. 2003. Innate immune response to encephalomyocarditis virus infection mediated by CD1d Immunology 110(4):519-26. [PubMed: 14632651]  [MGI Ref ID J:106350]

Exley MA; Bigley NJ; Cheng O; Tahir SM; Smiley ST; Carter QL; Stills HF; Grusby MJ; Koezuka Y; Taniguchi M; Balk SP. 2001. CD1d-reactive T-cell activation leads to amelioration of disease caused by diabetogenic encephalomyocarditis virus. J Leukoc Biol 69(5):713-8. [PubMed: 11358978]  [MGI Ref ID J:69645]

Fujiwara N; Porcelli SA; Naka T; Yano I; Maeda S; Kuwata H; Akira S; Uematsu S; Takii T; Ogura H; Kobayashi K. 2013. Bacterial sphingophospholipids containing non-hydroxy fatty acid activate murine macrophages via Toll-like receptor 4 and stimulate bacterial clearance. Biochim Biophys Acta 1831(6):1177-84. [PubMed: 23545566]  [MGI Ref ID J:202410]

Hams E; Locksley RM; McKenzie AN; Fallon PG. 2013. Cutting edge: IL-25 elicits innate lymphoid type 2 and type II NKT cells that regulate obesity in mice. J Immunol 191(11):5349-53. [PubMed: 24166975]  [MGI Ref ID J:207014]

Horowitz JC; Rogers DS; Simon RH; Sisson TH; Thannickal VJ. 2008. Plasminogen activation induced pericellular fibronectin proteolysis promotes fibroblast apoptosis. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 38(1):78-87. [PubMed: 17656680]  [MGI Ref ID J:142928]

Ilyinskii PO; Wang R; Balk SP; Exley MA. 2006. CD1d mediates T-cell-dependent resistance to secondary infection with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) in vitro and immune response to EMCV infection in vivo. J Virol 80(14):7146-58. [PubMed: 16809320]  [MGI Ref ID J:153330]

Ji Y; Sun S; Xia S; Yang L; Li X; Qi L. 2012. Short term high fat diet challenge promotes alternative macrophage polarization in adipose tissue via natural killer T cells and interleukin-4. J Biol Chem 287(29):24378-86. [PubMed: 22645141]  [MGI Ref ID J:188856]

Ji Y; Sun S; Xu A; Bhargava P; Yang L; Lam KS; Gao B; Lee CH; Kersten S; Qi L. 2012. Activation of natural killer T cells promotes M2 Macrophage polarization in adipose tissue and improves systemic glucose tolerance via interleukin-4 (IL-4)/STAT6 protein signaling axis in obesity. J Biol Chem 287(17):13561-71. [PubMed: 22396530]  [MGI Ref ID J:184470]

Jones TG; Finkelman FD; Austen KF; Gurish MF. 2010. T regulatory cells control antigen-induced recruitment of mast cell progenitors to the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. J Immunol 185(3):1804-11. [PubMed: 20601599]  [MGI Ref ID J:162451]

Joshi SK; Lang GA; Devera TS; Johnson AM; Kovats S; Lang ML. 2012. Differential contribution of dendritic cell CD1d to NKT cell-enhanced humoral immunity and CD8+ T cell activation. J Leukoc Biol 91(5):783-90. [PubMed: 22331103]  [MGI Ref ID J:183803]

Kastenmuller W; Torabi-Parizi P; Subramanian N; Lammermann T; Germain RN. 2012. A spatially-organized multicellular innate immune response in lymph nodes limits systemic pathogen spread. Cell 150(6):1235-48. [PubMed: 22980983]  [MGI Ref ID J:187962]

Kim HS; Kim HS; Lee CW; Chung DH. 2010. T cell Ig domain and mucin domain 1 engagement on invariant NKT cells in the presence of TCR stimulation enhances IL-4 production but inhibits IFN-gamma production. J Immunol 184(8):4095-106. [PubMed: 20220086]  [MGI Ref ID J:160057]

Lang GA; Devera TS; Lang ML. 2008. Requirement for CD1d expression by B cells to stimulate NKT cell-enhanced antibody production. Blood 111(4):2158-62. [PubMed: 18077787]  [MGI Ref ID J:131304]

Lang GA; Johnson AM; Devera TS; Joshi SK; Lang ML. 2011. Reduction of CD1d expression in vivo minimally affects NKT-enhanced antibody production but boosts B-cell memory. Int Immunol 23(4):251-60. [PubMed: 21398691]  [MGI Ref ID J:172079]

Lee CC; Kung JT. 2012. Marginal zone B cell is a major source of Il-10 in Listeria monocytogenes susceptibility. J Immunol 189(7):3319-27. [PubMed: 22933629]  [MGI Ref ID J:190348]

Lee IF; van den Elzen P; Tan R; Priatel JJ. 2011. NKT cells are required for complete Freund's adjuvant-mediated protection from autoimmune diabetes. J Immunol 187(6):2898-904. [PubMed: 21844383]  [MGI Ref ID J:179247]

Lee YJ; Holzapfel KL; Zhu J; Jameson SC; Hogquist KA. 2013. Steady-state production of IL-4 modulates immunity in mouse strains and is determined by lineage diversity of iNKT cells. Nat Immunol 14(11):1146-54. [PubMed: 24097110]  [MGI Ref ID J:208662]

Lynch L; Nowak M; Varghese B; Clark J; Hogan AE; Toxavidis V; Balk SP; O'Shea D; O'Farrelly C; Exley MA. 2012. Adipose Tissue Invariant NKT Cells Protect against Diet-Induced Obesity and Metabolic Disorder through Regulatory Cytokine Production. Immunity 37(3):574-87. [PubMed: 22981538]  [MGI Ref ID J:187659]

Minami K; Yanagawa Y; Iwabuchi K; Shinohara N; Harabayashi T; Nonomura K; Onoe K. 2005. Negative feedback regulation of T helper type 1 (Th1)/Th2 cytokine balance via dendritic cell and natural killer T cell interactions. Blood 106(5):1685-93. [PubMed: 15878981]  [MGI Ref ID J:118514]

Nieuwenhuis EE; Matsumoto T; Exley M; Schleipman RA; Glickman J; Bailey DT; Corazza N; Colgan SP; Onderdonk AB; Blumberg RS. 2002. CD1d-dependent macrophage-mediated clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from lung. Nat Med 8(6):588-93. [PubMed: 12042809]  [MGI Ref ID J:126853]

Nieuwenhuis EE; Matsumoto T; Lindenbergh D; Willemsen R; Kaser A; Simons-Oosterhuis Y; Brugman S; Yamaguchi K; Ishikawa H; Aiba Y; Koga Y; Samsom JN; Oshima K; Kikuchi M; Escher JC; Hattori M; Onderdonk AB; Blumberg RS. 2009. Cd1d-dependent regulation of bacterial colonization in the intestine of mice. J Clin Invest 119(5):1241-50. [PubMed: 19349688]  [MGI Ref ID J:149593]

Oshima T; Sonoda KH; Nakao S; Hijioka K; Taniguchi M; Ishibashi T. 2008. Protective role for CD1d-reactive invariant natural killer T cells in cauterization-induced corneal inflammation. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 49(1):105-12. [PubMed: 18172081]  [MGI Ref ID J:132503]

Palmer JL; Tulley JM; Kovacs EJ; Gamelli RL; Taniguchi M; Faunce DE. 2006. Injury-induced suppression of effector T cell immunity requires CD1d-positive APCs and CD1d-restricted NKT cells. J Immunol 177(1):92-9. [PubMed: 16785503]  [MGI Ref ID J:134408]

Park JE; Wu DY; Prendes M; Lu SX; Ragupathi G; Schrantz N; Chapman PB. 2008. Fine specificity of natural killer T cells against GD3 ganglioside and identification of GM3 as an inhibitory natural killer T-cell ligand. Immunology 123(1):145-55. [PubMed: 18154620]  [MGI Ref ID J:135461]

Porubsky S; Speak AO; Salio M; Jennemann R; Bonrouhi M; Zafarulla R; Singh Y; Dyson J; Luckow B; Lehuen A; Malle E; Muthing J; Platt FM; Cerundolo V; Grone HJ. 2012. Globosides but not isoglobosides can impact the development of invariant NKT cells and their interaction with dendritic cells. J Immunol 189(6):3007-17. [PubMed: 22875802]  [MGI Ref ID J:189359]

Reyes NJ; Mayhew E; Chen PW; Niederkorn JY. 2010. NKT cells are necessary for maximal expression of allergic conjunctivitis. Int Immunol 22(8):627-36. [PubMed: 20504886]  [MGI Ref ID J:162108]

Rymarchyk SL; Lowenstein H; Mayette J; Foster SR; Damby DE; Howe IW; Aktan I; Meyer RE; Poynter ME; Boyson JE. 2008. Widespread natural variation in murine natural killer T-cell number and function. Immunology 125(3):331-43. [PubMed: 18445005]  [MGI Ref ID J:144449]

Saubermann LJ; Beck P; De Jong YP; Pitman RS; Ryan MS; Kim HS; Exley M; Snapper S; Balk SP; Hagen SJ; Kanauchi O; Motoki K; Sakai T; Terhorst C; Koezuka Y; Podolsky DK; Blumberg RS. 2000. Activation of natural killer T cells by alpha-galactosylceramide in the presence of CD1d provides protection against colitis in mice. Gastroenterology 119(1):119-28. [PubMed: 10889161]  [MGI Ref ID J:63275]

Shah HB; Devera TS; Rampuria P; Lang GA; Lang ML. 2012. Type II NKT cells facilitate Alum-sensing and humoral immunity. J Leukoc Biol 92(4):883-93. [PubMed: 22798686]  [MGI Ref ID J:189639]

Shi FD; Flodstrom M; Balasa B; Kim SH; Van Gunst K; Strominger JL; Wilson SB; Sarvetnick N. 2001. Germ line deletion of the CD1 locus exacerbates diabetes in the NOD mouse. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98(12):6777-82. [PubMed: 11390999]  [MGI Ref ID J:69908]

Sille FC; Boxem M; Sprengers D; Veerapen N; Besra G; Boes M. 2009. Distinct requirements for CD1d intracellular transport for development of V(alpha)14 iNKT cells. J Immunol 183(3):1780-8. [PubMed: 19587020]  [MGI Ref ID J:151699]

Sonoda KH; Exley M; Snapper S; Balk SP; Stein-Streilein J. 1999. CD1-reactive natural killer T cells are required for development of systemic tolerance through an immune-privileged site [see comments] J Exp Med 190(9):1215-26. [PubMed: 10544194]  [MGI Ref ID J:58315]

Sonoda KH; Faunce DE; Taniguchi M; Exley M; Balk S; Stein-Streilein J. 2001. NK T cell-derived IL-10 is essential for the differentiation of antigen-specific T regulatory cells in systemic tolerance. J Immunol 166(1):42-50. [PubMed: 11123275]  [MGI Ref ID J:125981]

Sonoda KH; Sakamoto T; Qiao H; Hisatomi T; Oshima T; Tsutsumi-Miyahara C; Exley M; Balk SP; Taniguchi M; Ishibashi T. 2005. The analysis of systemic tolerance elicited by antigen inoculation into the vitreous cavity: vitreous cavity-associated immune deviation. Immunology 116(3):390-9. [PubMed: 16236129]  [MGI Ref ID J:103463]

Tazawa H; Irei T; Tanaka Y; Igarashi Y; Tashiro H; Ohdan H. 2013. Blockade of invariant TCR-CD1d interaction specifically inhibits antibody production against blood group A carbohydrates. Blood 122(15):2582-90. [PubMed: 23943651]  [MGI Ref ID J:203264]

Thomas SY; Scanlon ST; Griewank KG; Constantinides MG; Savage AK; Barr KA; Meng F; Luster AD; Bendelac A. 2011. PLZF induces an intravascular surveillance program mediated by long-lived LFA-1-ICAM-1 interactions. J Exp Med 208(6):1179-88. [PubMed: 21624939]  [MGI Ref ID J:176822]

Ueda N; Kuki H; Kamimura D; Sawa S; Seino K; Tashiro T; Fushuku K; Taniguchi M; Hirano T; Murakami M. 2006. CD1d-restricted NKT cell activation enhanced homeostatic proliferation of CD8+ T cells in a manner dependent on IL-4. Int Immunol 18(9):1397-404. [PubMed: 16914507]  [MGI Ref ID J:113387]

Uldrich AP; Patel O; Cameron G; Pellicci DG; Day EB; Sullivan LC; Kyparissoudis K; Kjer-Nielsen L; Vivian JP; Cao B; Brooks AG; Williams SJ; Illarionov P; Besra GS; Turner SJ; Porcelli SA; McCluskey J; Smyth MJ; Rossjohn J; Godfrey DI. 2011. A semi-invariant Valpha10+ T cell antigen receptor defines a population of natural killer T cells with distinct glycolipid antigen-recognition properties. Nat Immunol 12(7):616-23. [PubMed: 21666690]  [MGI Ref ID J:174311]

Waggoner SN; Cornberg M; Selin LK; Welsh RM. 2012. Natural killer cells act as rheostats modulating antiviral T cells. Nature 481(7381):394-8. [PubMed: 22101430]  [MGI Ref ID J:180370]

Yokote H; Miyake S; Croxford JL; Oki S; Mizusawa H; Yamamura T. 2008. NKT cell-dependent amelioration of a mouse model of multiple sclerosis by altering gut flora. Am J Pathol 173(6):1714-23. [PubMed: 18974295]  [MGI Ref ID J:143928]

Yue SC; Nowak M; Shaulov-Kask A; Wang R; Yue D; Balk SP; Exley MA. 2010. Direct CD1d-mediated stimulation of APC IL-12 production and protective immune response to virus infection in vivo. J Immunol 184(1):268-76. [PubMed: 19949077]  [MGI Ref ID J:159036]

Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $2525.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Frozen Products

Price (US dollars $)
Frozen Embryo $1650.00

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryopreserved Embryos
    Available to most shipping destinations1
    This strain is also available as cryopreserved embryos2. Orders for cryopreserved embryos may be placed with our Customer Service Department. Experienced technicians at The Jackson Laboratory have recovered frozen embryos of this strain successfully. We will provide you enough embryos to perform two embryo transfers. The Jackson Laboratory does not guarantee successful recovery at your facility. For complete information on purchasing embryos, please visit our Cryopreserved Embryos web page.

    1 Shipments cannot be made to Australia due to Australian government import restrictions.
    2 Embryos for most strains are cryopreserved at the two cell stage while some strains are cryopreserved at the eight cell stage. If this information is important to you, please contact Customer Service.
  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3283.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Frozen Products

Price (US dollars $)
Frozen Embryo $2145.00

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryopreserved Embryos
    Available to most shipping destinations1
    This strain is also available as cryopreserved embryos2. Orders for cryopreserved embryos may be placed with our Customer Service Department. Experienced technicians at The Jackson Laboratory have recovered frozen embryos of this strain successfully. We will provide you enough embryos to perform two embryo transfers. The Jackson Laboratory does not guarantee successful recovery at your facility. For complete information on purchasing embryos, please visit our Cryopreserved Embryos web page.

    1 Shipments cannot be made to Australia due to Australian government import restrictions.
    2 Embryos for most strains are cryopreserved at the two cell stage while some strains are cryopreserved at the eight cell stage. If this information is important to you, please contact Customer Service.
  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

General Supply Notes

Control Information

  Control
   001976 NOD/ShiLtJ
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

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The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
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JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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