Strain Name:

NOD.B6-Tg(ML5sHEL)5Ccg/DvsJ

Stock Number:

006610

Order this mouse

Availability:

Cryopreserved - Ready for recovery

Common Names: NOD.sHel;    

Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Transgenic;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Specieslaboratory mouse
Background Strain NOD/ShiLt
Donor Strain C57BL/6J
H2 Haplotypeg7
GenerationN11F15pN1
Generation Definitions
 
Donating InvestigatorDr. David Serreze,   The Jackson Laboratory

Appearance
pink-eyed, albino
Related Genotype: A/A Tyrc/Tyrc

Description
Transgenic mice are viable, fertile, normal in size, agouti in color and express a soluable form of hen egg lysozyme. They become diabetic at a rate similar to NOD controls. This strain can be used to study B-cell selection and tolerance as it relates to Type 1 Diabetes.

Development
This transgenic strain was generated by backcrossing transgenic mice on the C57BL/6 background (Stock No. 002599) to NOD/ShiLt for 11 generations. The strain has been maintained subsequently by brother-sister matings. It has been observed that the agouti coat color co-segregates with the transgene; therefore, albino mice are likely to be wild-type and the agouti mice are likely to be transgenic. The Type 1 Diabetes Resource received this stock for Dr. David Serezze's research colony (Stock No. 004252) in 2007 at generation N11F15.

Control Information

  Control
   Noncarrier
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying   Tg(ML5sHEL)5Ccg allele
002599   C57BL/6-Tg(ML5sHEL)5Ccg/J
View Strains carrying   Tg(ML5sHEL)5Ccg     (1 strain)

View Strains carrying other alleles of Mt1     (15 strains)

Strains carrying other alleles of HEL
002598   C57BL/6-Tg(KLK4mHEL)6Ccg/J
004258   NOD.B6-Tg(KLK4mHEL)6Ccg/Dvs
View Strains carrying other alleles of HEL     (2 strains)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Diabetes and Obesity Research
Type 1 Diabetes (IDDM) Analysis Strains
      NOD Transgenics

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
Autoimmunity
      Type 1 Diabetes
CD Antigens, Antigen Receptors, and Histocompatibility Markers

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Tg(ML5sHEL)5Ccg
Allele Name transgene insertion 5, Christopher C Goodnow
Allele Type Transgenic (random, expressed)
Common Name(s) MD5; ML-5; ML5; SWHEL; sHEL; solHEL;
Mutation Made ByDr. Christopher Goodnow,   Stanford University School of Medicine
Strain of OriginC57BL/6
Expressed Gene HEL, HEL, chicken
Promoter Mt1, metallothionein 1, mouse, laboratory
Molecular Note A genomic fragment containing the coding exons of the chicken lysozyme gene (also known as hen egg lysozyme, HEL) was linked to a mouse metallothionein I promoter. The mouse metallothionein I promoter is active during embryonic, fetal, and adult life, and can be induced to higher levels of transcription by heavy metals. Mice carrying the transgene had measurable, soluble chicken lysozyme in their serum. The line chosen for study (ML-5) had the highest serum lysozyme concentrations. [MGI Ref ID J:78308]
 
 

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Tg(KLK4mHEL)6Ccg, Tg(ML5sHEL)5Ccg, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Silveira PA; Chapman HD; Stolp J; Johnson E; Cox SL; Hunter K; Wicker LS; Serreze DV. 2006. Genes within the Idd5 and Idd9/11 Diabetes Susceptibility Loci Affect the Pathogenic Activity of B Cells in Nonobese Diabetic Mice. J Immunol 177(10):7033-41. [PubMed: 17082619]  [MGI Ref ID J:114754]

Silveira PA; Dombrowsky J; Johnson E; Chapman HD; Nemazee D; Serreze DV. 2004. B cell selection defects underlie the development of diabetogenic APCs in nonobese diabetic mice. J Immunol 172(8):5086-94. [PubMed: 15067092]  [MGI Ref ID J:89156]

Additional References

Tg(ML5sHEL)5Ccg related

Akkaraju S; Ho WY; Leong D; Canaan K; Davis MM; Goodnow CC. 1997. A range of CD4 T cell tolerance: partial inactivation to organ-specific antigen allows nondestructive thyroiditis or insulitis. Immunity 7(2):255-71. [PubMed: 9285410]  [MGI Ref ID J:78309]

Barrington RA; Borde M; Rao A; Carroll MC. 2006. Involvement of NFAT1 in B cell self-tolerance. J Immunol 177(3):1510-5. [PubMed: 16849457]  [MGI Ref ID J:137979]

Baumjohann D; Preite S; Reboldi A; Ronchi F; Ansel KM; Lanzavecchia A; Sallusto F. 2013. Persistent antigen and germinal center B cells sustain T follicular helper cell responses and phenotype. Immunity 38(3):596-605. [PubMed: 23499493]  [MGI Ref ID J:195114]

Blery M; Tze L; Miosge LA; Jun JE; Goodnow CC. 2006. Essential role of membrane cholesterol in accelerated BCR internalization and uncoupling from NF-kappa B in B cell clonal anergy. J Exp Med 203(7):1773-83. [PubMed: 16801401]  [MGI Ref ID J:124402]

Browne CD; Del Nagro CJ; Cato MH; Dengler HS; Rickert RC. 2009. Suppression of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate production is a key determinant of B cell anergy. Immunity 31(5):749-60. [PubMed: 19896393]  [MGI Ref ID J:155314]

Calderon B; Suri A; Miller MJ; Unanue ER. 2008. Dendritic cells in islets of Langerhans constitutively present beta cell-derived peptides bound to their class II MHC molecules. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105(16):6121-6. [PubMed: 18427107]  [MGI Ref ID J:134675]

Chackerian B; Durfee MR; Schiller JT. 2008. Virus-like display of a neo-self antigen reverses B cell anergy in a B cell receptor transgenic mouse model. J Immunol 180(9):5816-25. [PubMed: 18424700]  [MGI Ref ID J:134321]

Chang NH; Cheung YH; Loh C; Pau E; Roy V; Cai YC; Wither J. 2010. B cell activating factor (BAFF) and T cells cooperate to breach B cell tolerance in lupus-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice. PLoS One 5(7):e11691. [PubMed: 20661465]  [MGI Ref ID J:163088]

Cook MC; Basten A; Fazekas de St Groth B. 1997. Outer periarteriolar lymphoid sheath arrest and subsequent differentiation of both naive and tolerant immunoglobulin transgenic B cells is determined by B cell receptor occupancy. J Exp Med 186(5):631-43. [PubMed: 9271579]  [MGI Ref ID J:132748]

Cornall RJ; Cheng AM; Pawson T; Goodnow CC. 2000. Role of Syk in B-cell development and antigen-receptor signaling. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97(4):1713-8. [PubMed: 10677523]  [MGI Ref ID J:60647]

Cornall RJ; Cyster JG; Hibbs ML; Dunn AR; Otipoby KL; Clark EA; Goodnow CC. 1998. Polygenic autoimmune traits: Lyn, CD22, and SHP-1 are limiting elements of a biochemical pathway regulating BCR signaling and selection. Immunity 8(4):497-508. [PubMed: 9586639]  [MGI Ref ID J:110531]

Cox SL; Stolp J; Hallahan NL; Counotte J; Zhang W; Serreze DV; Basten A; Silveira PA. 2010. Enhanced responsiveness to T-cell help causes loss of B-lymphocyte tolerance to a beta-cell neo-self-antigen in type 1 diabetes prone NOD mice. Eur J Immunol 40(12):3413-25. [PubMed: 21108464]  [MGI Ref ID J:174579]

Crawford G; Enders A; Gileadi U; Stankovic S; Zhang Q; Lambe T; Crockford TL; Lockstone HE; Freeman A; Arkwright PD; Smart JM; Ma CS; Tangye SG; Goodnow CC; Cerundolo V; Godfrey DI; Su HC; Randall KL; Cornall RJ. 2013. DOCK8 is critical for the survival and function of NKT cells. Blood 122(12):2052-61. [PubMed: 23929855]  [MGI Ref ID J:202494]

Culton DA; O'Conner BP; Conway KL; Diz R; Rutan J; Vilen BJ; Clarke SH. 2006. Early preplasma cells define a tolerance checkpoint for autoreactive B cells. J Immunol 176(2):790-802. [PubMed: 16393962]  [MGI Ref ID J:126633]

Cyster JG; Goodnow CC. 1995. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1C negatively regulates antigen receptor signaling in B lymphocytes and determines thresholds for negative selection. Immunity 2(1):13-24. [PubMed: 7600299]  [MGI Ref ID J:28348]

Ekland EH; Forster R; Lipp M; Cyster JG. 2004. Requirements for follicular exclusion and competitive elimination of autoantigen-binding B cells. J Immunol 172(8):4700-8. [PubMed: 15067045]  [MGI Ref ID J:89130]

Enders A; Bouillet P; Puthalakath H; Xu Y; Tarlinton DM; Strasser A. 2003. Loss of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only Bcl-2 family member Bim inhibits BCR stimulation-induced apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive B cells. J Exp Med 198(7):1119-26. [PubMed: 14517273]  [MGI Ref ID J:86002]

Foote LC; Evans JW; Cifuni JM; Siracusa MC; Monteforte GM; McCole JL; D'Orazio CC; Hastings WD; Rothstein TL. 2004. Interleukin-4 produces a breakdown of tolerance in vivo with autoantibody formation and tissue damage. Autoimmunity 37(8):569-77. [PubMed: 15763919]  [MGI Ref ID J:128253]

Getahun A; Smith MJ; Kogut I; van Dyk LF; Cambier JC. 2012. Retention of anergy and inhibition of antibody responses during acute gamma herpesvirus 68 infection. J Immunol 189(6):2965-74. [PubMed: 22904300]  [MGI Ref ID J:189918]

Giltiay NV; Lu Y; Allman D; Jorgensen TN; Li X. 2010. The adaptor molecule Act1 regulates BAFF responsiveness and self-reactive B cell selection during transitional B cell maturation. J Immunol 185(1):99-109. [PubMed: 20543113]  [MGI Ref ID J:161592]

Goodnow CC; Crosbie J; Adelstein S; Lavoie TB; Smith-Gill SJ; Brink RA; Pritchard-Briscoe H; Wotherspoon JS; Loblay RH; Raphael K; et al.. 1988. Altered immunoglobulin expression and functional silencing of self-reactive B lymphocytes in transgenic mice. Nature 334(6184):676-82. [PubMed: 3261841]  [MGI Ref ID J:78308]

Hartley SB; Crosbie J; Brink R; Kantor AB; Basten A; Goodnow CC. 1991. Elimination from peripheral lymphoid tissues of self-reactive B lymphocytes recognizing membrane-bound antigens. Nature 353(6346):765-9. [PubMed: 1944535]  [MGI Ref ID J:78307]

Hermiston ML; Tan AL; Gupta VA; Majeti R; Weiss A. 2005. The juxtamembrane wedge negatively regulates CD45 function in B cells. Immunity 23(6):635-47. [PubMed: 16356861]  [MGI Ref ID J:113310]

Hippen KL; Schram BR; Tze LE; Pape KA; Jenkins MK; Behrens TW. 2005. In vivo assessment of the relative contributions of deletion, anergy, and editing to B cell self-tolerance. J Immunol 175(2):909-16. [PubMed: 16002689]  [MGI Ref ID J:100671]

Hippen KL; Tze LE; Behrens TW. 2000. CD5 maintains tolerance in anergic B cells. J Exp Med 191(5):883-90. [PubMed: 10704468]  [MGI Ref ID J:124695]

Ho WY; Cooke MP; Goodnow CC; Davis MM. 1994. Resting and anergic B cells are defective in CD28-dependent costimulation of naive CD4+ T cells. J Exp Med 179(5):1539-49. [PubMed: 7909325]  [MGI Ref ID J:73608]

Ismail N; Basten A; Briscoe H; Bretscher PA. 2005. Increasing the foreignness of an antigen, by coupling a second and foreign antigen to it, increases the T helper type 2 component of the immune response to the first antigen. Immunology 115(1):34-41. [PubMed: 15819695]  [MGI Ref ID J:97463]

Jeelall YS; Wang JQ; Law HD; Domaschenz H; Fung HK; Kallies A; Nutt SL; Goodnow CC; Horikawa K. 2012. Human lymphoma mutations reveal CARD11 as the switch between self-antigen-induced B cell death or proliferation and autoantibody production. J Exp Med 209(11):1907-17. [PubMed: 23027925]  [MGI Ref ID J:190942]

Kilmon MA; Rutan JA; Clarke SH; Vilen BJ. 2005. Low-affinity, Smith antigen-specific B cells are tolerized by dendritic cells and macrophages. J Immunol 175(1):37-41. [PubMed: 15972629]  [MGI Ref ID J:100598]

Kilmon MA; Wagner NJ; Garland AL; Lin L; Aviszus K; Wysocki LJ; Vilen BJ. 2007. Macrophages prevent the differentiation of autoreactive B cells by secreting CD40 ligand and interleukin-6. Blood 110(5):1595-602. [PubMed: 17712049]  [MGI Ref ID J:145511]

Kitaura Y; Jang IK; Wang Y; Han YC; Inazu T; Cadera EJ; Schlissel M; Hardy RR; Gu H. 2007. Control of the B cell-intrinsic tolerance programs by ubiquitin ligases Cbl and Cbl-b. Immunity 26(5):567-78. [PubMed: 17493844]  [MGI Ref ID J:123596]

Kumar KR; Li L; Yan M; Bhaskarabhatla M; Mobley AB; Nguyen C; Mooney JM; Schatzle JD; Wakeland EK; Mohan C. 2006. Regulation of B cell tolerance by the lupus susceptibility gene Ly108. Science 312(5780):1665-9. [PubMed: 16778059]  [MGI Ref ID J:109640]

Lee SR; Rutan JA; Monteith AJ; Jones SZ; Kang SA; Krum KN; Kilmon MA; Roques JR; Wagner NJ; Clarke SH; Vilen BJ. 2012. Receptor cross-talk spatially restricts p-ERK during TLR4 stimulation of autoreactive B cells. J Immunol 189(8):3859-68. [PubMed: 22984080]  [MGI Ref ID J:190650]

Liu X; Wysocki LJ; Manser T. 2007. Autoantigen-B cell antigen receptor interactions that regulate expression of B cell antigen receptor Loci. J Immunol 178(8):5035-47. [PubMed: 17404286]  [MGI Ref ID J:145282]

Manderson AP; Quah B; Botto M; Goodnow CC; Walport MJ; Parish CR. 2006. A novel mechanism for complement activation at the surface of B cells following antigen binding. J Immunol 177(8):5155-62. [PubMed: 17015700]  [MGI Ref ID J:139451]

Mason DY; Jones M; Goodnow CC. 1992. Development and follicular localization of tolerant B lymphocytes in lysozyme/anti-lysozyme IgM/IgD transgenic mice. Int Immunol 4(2):163-75. [PubMed: 1622894]  [MGI Ref ID J:109923]

Mecklenbrauker I; Saijo K; Zheng NY; Leitges M; Tarakhovsky A. 2002. Protein kinase Cdelta controls self-antigen-induced B-cell tolerance. Nature 416(6883):860-5. [PubMed: 11976686]  [MGI Ref ID J:76134]

Miller AT; Beisner DR; Liu D; Cooke MP. 2009. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase B is a negative regulator of BCR signaling that controls B cell selection and tolerance induction. J Immunol 182(8):4696-704. [PubMed: 19342645]  [MGI Ref ID J:147739]

Neighbors M; Hartley SB; Xu X; Castro AG; Bouley DM; O'Garra A. 2006. Breakpoints in immunoregulation required for Th1 cells to induce diabetes. Eur J Immunol 36(9):2315-23. [PubMed: 16933361]  [MGI Ref ID J:116743]

Nijnik A; Ferry H; Lewis G; Rapsomaniki E; Leung JC; Daser A; Lambe T; Goodnow CC; Cornall RJ. 2006. Spontaneous B cell hyperactivity in autoimmune-prone MRL mice. Int Immunol 18(7):1127-37. [PubMed: 16735376]  [MGI Ref ID J:110236]

O'Neill SK; Getahun A; Gauld SB; Merrell KT; Tamir I; Smith MJ; Dal Porto JM; Li QZ; Cambier JC. 2011. Monophosphorylation of CD79a and CD79b ITAM Motifs Initiates a SHIP-1 Phosphatase-Mediated Inhibitory Signaling Cascade Required for B Cell Anergy. Immunity 35(5):746-56. [PubMed: 22078222]  [MGI Ref ID J:178833]

Phan TG; Amesbury M; Gardam S; Crosbie J; Hasbold J; Hodgkin PD; Basten A; Brink R. 2003. B cell receptor-independent stimuli trigger immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination and production of IgG autoantibodies by anergic self-reactive B cells. J Exp Med 197(7):845-60. [PubMed: 12668643]  [MGI Ref ID J:132538]

Refaeli Y; Young RM; Turner BC; Duda J; Field KA; Bishop JM. 2008. The B cell antigen receptor and overexpression of MYC can cooperate in the genesis of B cell lymphomas. PLoS Biol 6(6):e152. [PubMed: 18578569]  [MGI Ref ID J:139351]

Rodriguez-Pinto D; Moreno J. 2005. B cells can prime naive CD4+ T cells in vivo in the absence of other professional antigen-presenting cells in a CD154-CD40-dependent manner. Eur J Immunol 35(4):1097-105. [PubMed: 15756646]  [MGI Ref ID J:97821]

Roy V; Chang NH; Cai Y; Bonventi G; Wither J. 2005. Aberrant IgM signaling promotes survival of transitional T1 B cells and prevents tolerance induction in lupus-prone New Zealand black mice. J Immunol 175(11):7363-71. [PubMed: 16301643]  [MGI Ref ID J:122135]

Van Parijs L; Biuckians A; Abbas AK. 1998. Functional roles of Fas and Bcl-2-regulated apoptosis of T lymphocytes. J Immunol 160(5):2065-71. [PubMed: 9498742]  [MGI Ref ID J:112062]

Winslow MM; Gallo EM; Neilson JR; Crabtree GR. 2006. The calcineurin phosphatase complex modulates immunogenic B cell responses. Immunity 24(2):141-52. [PubMed: 16473827]  [MGI Ref ID J:113318]

Wong MX; Hayball JD; Jackson DE. 2008. PECAM-1-regulated signalling thresholds control tolerance in anergic transgenic B-cells. Mol Immunol 45(6):1767-81. [PubMed: 17977600]  [MGI Ref ID J:131644]

Yau IW; Cato MH; Jellusova J; Hurtado de Mendoza T; Brink R; Rickert RC. 2013. Censoring of self-reactive B cells by follicular dendritic cell-displayed self-antigen. J Immunol 191(3):1082-90. [PubMed: 23817432]  [MGI Ref ID J:205710]

Young RM; Hardy IR; Clarke RL; Lundy N; Pine P; Turner BC; Potter TA; Refaeli Y. 2009. Mouse models of non-Hodgkin lymphoma reveal Syk as an important therapeutic target. Blood 113(11):2508-16. [PubMed: 18981293]  [MGI Ref ID J:146340]

Young RM; Polsky A; Refaeli Y. 2009. TC-PTP is required for the maintenance of MYC-driven B-cell lymphomas. Blood 114(24):5016-23. [PubMed: 19755676]  [MGI Ref ID J:155497]

Yu M; Chen Y; He Y; Podd A; Fu G; Wright JA; Kleiman E; Khan WN; Wen R; Wang D. 2012. Critical role of B cell lymphoma 10 in BAFF-regulated NF-kappaB activation and survival of anergic B cells. J Immunol 189(11):5185-93. [PubMed: 23087406]  [MGI Ref ID J:190683]

Zikherman J; Doan K; Parameswaran R; Raschke W; Weiss A. 2012. Quantitative differences in CD45 expression unmask functions for CD45 in B-cell development, tolerance, and survival. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109(1):E3-12. [PubMed: 22135465]  [MGI Ref ID J:180527]

Zwickey HL; Unternaehrer JJ; Mellman I. 2006. Presentation of self-antigens on MHC class II molecules during dendritic cell maturation. Int Immunol 18(1):199-209. [PubMed: 16361313]  [MGI Ref ID J:104201]

Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $2450.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.
    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 11 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice
    Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3185.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.
    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 11 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice
    Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

General Supply Notes

Control Information

  Control
   Noncarrier
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
Surgical and Preconditioning Services
JAX® Services
Customer Services and Support
Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
Technical Support Email Form

Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


(6.5)