Strain Name:

NOD.Cg-Vdrtm1Ska/CmatJ

Stock Number:

006956

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Availability:

Cryopreserved - Ready for recovery

Common Names: NOD.Vdr;     Vdr -/- NOD-;    

Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Specieslaboratory mouse
Background Strain NOD/Leuven
Donor Strain (C57BL/6 x CBA)F1
H2 Haplotypeg7
GenerationN14+N1F1pN1
Generation Definitions
 
Donating InvestigatorDr. Chantal Mathieu,   LEGENDO

Appearance
albino
Related Genotype: A/A Tyrc/Tyrc

Description
Heterozygous mice are viable, fertile, and phenotypically indistinguishable from wildtype siblings. Homozygous mutant mice are viable but infertile. No VDR mRNA is detected by RT-PCR in samples from the intestine or kidney or from homozygous mutant embryo. Increased expression of CTP27B1 and reduced expression of CYP24A1 and calbindin-D9k is detected by RT-PCR in samples from VDR-deficient kidneys.

Although mice homozygous for this targeted mutation are viable, shortly after weaning they exhibit dysmorphic features including a flat face and short nose, alopecia, growth retardation, and skeletal defects including hypocalcaemia, decreased bone mineral density, widened growth plates with hypomineralization, less trabeculae and thicker osteo seams. Homozygous mutant mice exhibit metabolic imbalances including abnormally high and low levels of 1,25(OH),2D3 and 25(OH)D3, respectively and abnormal cytokine and chemokine profiles.

Homozygous mice exhibit normal pancreatic islet architecture and insulitis severity is similar to NOD wildtype controls. Diabetes onset and incidence in mutant and wildtype mice is similar for both males (mutants 30% vs wildtypes 38%) and females (mutants 69% versus wildtype 70%) by 250 days of age.

Mice homozygous for this mutation may be useful in studies of rickets, alopecia, skeletal homeostasis, intestinal absorption, the role of 1,25(OH),2D3 in the immune system as it relates to T1D protection, and to determine the function of vitamin D3 analogs in pancreatic beta cells.

Development
Vitamin D receptor, Vdr, is located on Chr 15, 97682461-97736330 bp. Vit. D deficiency in humans increases the risk for type I diabetes in genetically predisposed individuals. In the targeting construct, a neomycin cassette replaced a 1.1-kb fragment containing exon 2, which encodes the first of two zinc fingers in the DNA-binding domain. Properly targeted TT2, (C57BL/6 x CBA)F1, ES cell clones were introduced into CD-1 embryos. Mice carrying this mutation were backcrossed for 14 generation to NOD/Leuven prior to sibling mating. Microsatellite analysis confirms Idd alleles 1 through 15 are NOD in origin. In addition, a concentration of Mit markers were tested on Chr 15 to ensure NOD homozygosity because there are several immune and regulatory genes in close proximity to the Vdr gene. In 2007, the T1DR received this strain at generation N14F7 and mated with NOD/ShiLtJ (Stock No. 001976) once prior to sibling mating.

Control Information

  Control
   Wild-type from the colony
   001976 NOD/ShiLtJ
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying other alleles of Vdr
006133   B6.129S4-Vdrtm1Mbd/J
View Strains carrying other alleles of Vdr     (1 strain)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
- Potential model based on gene homology relationships. Phenotypic similarity to the human disease has not been tested.
Osteoporosis   (VDR)
Vitamin D-Dependent Rickets, Type 2A; VDDR2A   (VDR)
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Vdrtm1Ska/Vdrtm1Ska

        NOD.Cg-Vdrtm1Ska/CmatJ
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • postnatal growth retardation
    • mice exhibit growth retardation   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal glucose tolerance
    • glucose tolerance is impaired compared to non-NOD mice but the results are identical when compared to NOD mice with wild-type VDR alleles   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
  • decreased circulating calcium level
    • hypocalcemia is found with high levels of the active metabolite of vitamin D in the sera of mice   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal T cell number
    • there is a significant decrease in the number of double negative (CD4-CD8-) alphabeta T cells found in the spleen compared to littermate controls   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
    • decreased regulatory T cell number
      • there are decreased numbers of CD4+CD25+ T cells found in the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes and in the thymus   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
  • abnormal chemokine secretion
    • activated macrophages make significantly less CCL2 when activated in vitro with LPS   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
  • abnormal dendritic cell differentiation
    • thymic and lymph node dendritic cells show defective maturation as indicated by low CD86 expression   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
  • abnormal interleukin-1 secretion
    • there is almost a 4-fold reduction in the amount of IL-1 produced by macrophages when activated by LPS in vitro   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
    • resting macrophages also produce significantly less IL-1   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
  • decreased interleukin-6 secretion
    • there is a 2-fold reduction in the amount of IL-6 produced by macrophages when activated by LPS in vitro   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
    • resting macrophages also produce less IL-6   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
  • increased susceptibility to autoimmune diabetes
    • mice develop insulitis and diabetes at the same rate as NOD mice with wild-type VDR alleles   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
    • the incidence of diabetes by 250 days of age was 50% in males and 67% in females at N10, and 30% in males and 69% in females at N10   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
    • mean onset of disease for male mice is 163 days and for female mice 142 days   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal T cell number
    • there is a significant decrease in the number of double negative (CD4-CD8-) alphabeta T cells found in the spleen compared to littermate controls   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
    • decreased regulatory T cell number
      • there are decreased numbers of CD4+CD25+ T cells found in the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes and in the thymus   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
  • abnormal dendritic cell differentiation
    • thymic and lymph node dendritic cells show defective maturation as indicated by low CD86 expression   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
  • skeleton phenotype
  • decreased bone mineral density
    • decreased bone mineral density is observed along with less trabeculae and thicker osteoid seams   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
  • increased long bone epiphyseal plate size
    • mice have widened growth plates that are hypomineralized   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
  • integument phenotype
  • alopecia
    • mice exhibit alopecia   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal dendritic cell differentiation
    • thymic and lymph node dendritic cells show defective maturation as indicated by low CD86 expression   (MGI Ref ID J:127787)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Dermatology Research
Skin and Hair Texture Defects

Diabetes and Obesity Research
Type 1 Diabetes (IDDM)
      Congenics with mutations affecting cytokine production by autoreactive T cells

Endocrine Deficiency Research
Bone/Bone Marrow Defects
Gastrointestinal Defects
Skin Defects

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
Autoimmunity
      Type 1 Diabetes
Growth Factors/Receptors/Cytokines
Immunodeficiency
      Inflammatory bowel disease
Inflammation
      Inflammatory bowel disease

Internal/Organ Research
Kidney Defects

Vdrtm1Ska related

Dermatology Research
Skin and Hair Texture Defects

Endocrine Deficiency Research
Bone/Bone Marrow Defects
Gastrointestinal Defects
Skin Defects

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
Growth Factors/Receptors/Cytokines
Immunodeficiency
      Inflammatory bowel disease
Inflammation
      Inflammatory bowel disease

Internal/Organ Research
Gastrointestinal Defects
      colitis

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Vdrtm1Ska
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Shigeaki Kato
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Common Name(s) Tokyo VDR-KO; VDR KO; VDR-; VDRKO;
Mutation Made By Shigeaki Kato,   The University of Tokyo, 113-0032
Strain of Origin(C57BL/6NCrlj x CBA/JNCrlj)F1
ES Cell Line NameTT2
ES Cell Line Strain(C57BL/6NCrlj x CBA/JNCrlj)F1
Gene Symbol and Name Vdr, vitamin D receptor
Chromosome 15
Gene Common Name(s) NR1I1; PPP1R163;
Molecular Note A neomycin resistance cassette replaced 1.1kb of sequence containing exon 2, which encodes the first zinc finger of the DNA binding domain. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis of intestinal tissue from homozygous mice detected the presence of a truncated transcript and protein that appears to use Met 53 in exon 3 as an initiation site. This truncated protein is able to bind ligand but lacks transactivation activity. [MGI Ref ID J:129684] [MGI Ref ID J:42054]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Vdrtm1Ska, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Gysemans C; van Etten E; Overbergh L; Giulietti A; Eelen G; Waer M; Verstuyf A; Bouillon R; Mathieu C. 2007. UNALTERED DIABETES PRESENTATION IN NOD MICE LACKING THE VITAMIN D RECEPTOR. Diabetes :. [PubMed: 17959935]  [MGI Ref ID J:127787]

Yoshizawa T; Handa Y; Uematsu Y; Takeda S; Sekine K; Yoshihara Y ; Kawakami T ; Arioka K ; Sato H ; Uchiyama Y ; Masushige S ; Fukamizu A ; Matsumoto T ; Kato S. 1997. Mice lacking the vitamin D receptor exhibit impaired bone formation, uterine hypoplasia and growth retardation after weaning. Nat Genet 16(4):391-6. [PubMed: 9241280]  [MGI Ref ID J:42054]

Additional References

Vdrtm1Ska related

Aihara K; Azuma H; Akaike M; Ikeda Y; Yamashita M; Sudo T; Hayashi H; Yamada Y; Endoh F; Fujimura M; Yoshida T; Yamaguchi H; Hashizume S; Kato M; Yoshimura K; Yamamoto Y; Kato S; Matsumoto T. 2004. Disruption of nuclear vitamin D receptor gene causes enhanced thrombogenicity in mice. J Biol Chem 279(34):35798-802. [PubMed: 15205460]  [MGI Ref ID J:92388]

Bula CM; Huhtakangas J; Olivera C; Bishop JE; Norman AW; Henry HL. 2005. Presence of a truncated form of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in a strain of VDR-knockout mice. Endocrinology 146(12):5581-6. [PubMed: 16150907]  [MGI Ref ID J:129684]

Burne TH; Johnston AN; McGrath JJ; Mackay-Sim A. 2006. Swimming behaviour and post-swimming activity in Vitamin D receptor knockout mice. Brain Res Bull 69(1):74-8. [PubMed: 16464687]  [MGI Ref ID J:128632]

Burne TH; McGrath JJ; Eyles DW; Mackay-Sim A. 2005. Behavioural characterization of Vitamin D receptor knockout mice. Behav Brain Res 157(2):299-308. [PubMed: 15639181]  [MGI Ref ID J:95324]

Capuano P; Radanovic T; Wagner CA; Bacic D; Kato S; Uchiyama Y; St-Arnoud R; Murer H; Biber J. 2005. Intestinal and renal adaptation to a low-Pi diet of type II NaPi cotransporters in vitamin D receptor- and 1alphaOHase-deficient mice. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 288(2):C429-34. [PubMed: 15643054]  [MGI Ref ID J:101227]

Choi M; Ozeki J; Hashizume M; Kato S; Ishihara H; Makishima M. 2012. Vitamin D receptor activation induces peptide YY transcription in pancreatic islets. Endocrinology 153(11):5188-99. [PubMed: 22962257]  [MGI Ref ID J:191799]

Chorro L; Sarde A; Li M; Woollard KJ; Chambon P; Malissen B; Kissenpfennig A; Barbaroux JB; Groves R; Geissmann F. 2009. Langerhans cell (LC) proliferation mediates neonatal development, homeostasis, and inflammation-associated expansion of the epidermal LC network. J Exp Med 206(13):3089-100. [PubMed: 19995948]  [MGI Ref ID J:155680]

Davideau JL; Lezot F; Kato S; Bailleul-Forestier I; Berdal A. 2004. Dental alveolar bone defects related to Vitamin D and calcium status. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 89-90:615-8. [PubMed: 15225849]  [MGI Ref ID J:91343]

Demay MB; MacDonald PN; Skorija K; Dowd DR; Cianferotti L; Cox M. 2007. Role of the vitamin D receptor in hair follicle biology. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 103(3-5):344-6. [PubMed: 17223342]  [MGI Ref ID J:120248]

Demetriou SK; Ona-Vu K; Teichert AE; Cleaver JE; Bikle DD; Oh DH. 2012. Vitamin D receptor mediates DNA repair and is UV inducible in intact epidermis but not in cultured keratinocytes. J Invest Dermatol 132(8):2097-100. [PubMed: 22495177]  [MGI Ref ID J:189441]

Driver JP; Lamont DJ; Gysemans C; Mathieu C; Serreze DV. 2011. Calcium insufficiency accelerates type 1 diabetes in vitamin D receptor-deficient nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Endocrinology 152(12):4620-9. [PubMed: 21952242]  [MGI Ref ID J:179102]

Endo I; Inoue D; Mitsui T; Umaki Y; Akaike M; Yoshizawa T; Kato S; Matsumoto T. 2003. Deletion of vitamin D receptor gene in mice results in abnormal skeletal muscle development with deregulated expression of myoregulatory transcription factors. Endocrinology 144(12):5138-44. [PubMed: 12959989]  [MGI Ref ID J:87247]

Endres B; Kato S; DeLuca HF. 2000. Metabolism of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) in vitamin D receptor-ablated mice in vivo. Biochemistry 39(8):2123-9. [PubMed: 10684662]  [MGI Ref ID J:60623]

Froicu M; Weaver V; Wynn TA; McDowell MA; Welsh JE; Cantorna MT. 2003. A crucial role for the vitamin d receptor in experimental inflammatory bowel diseases. Mol Endocrinol 17(12):2386-92. [PubMed: 14500760]  [MGI Ref ID J:86860]

Han MS; Che X; Cho GH; Park HR; Lim KE; Park NR; Jin JS; Jung YK; Jeong JH; Lee IK; Kato S; Choi JY. 2013. Functional cooperation between vitamin D receptor and Runx2 in vitamin D-induced vascular calcification. PLoS One 8(12):e83584. [PubMed: 24349534]  [MGI Ref ID J:209861]

Inoue Y; Segawa H; Kaneko I; Yamanaka S; Kusano K; Kawakami E; Furutani J; Ito M; Kuwahata M; Saito H; Fukushima N; Kato S; Kanayama HO; Miyamoto K. 2005. Role of the vitamin D receptor in FGF23 action on phosphate metabolism. Biochem J 390(Pt 1):325-31. [PubMed: 15885032]  [MGI Ref ID J:117597]

Ishizawa M; Ogura M; Kato S; Makishima M. 2012. Impairment of bilirubin clearance and intestinal interleukin-6 expression in bile duct-ligated vitamin D receptor null mice. PLoS One 7(12):e51664. [PubMed: 23240054]  [MGI Ref ID J:195673]

Jiang YJ; Teichert AE; Fong F; Oda Y; Bikle DD. 2013. 1alpha,25(OH)2-Dihydroxyvitamin D3/VDR protects the skin from UVB-induced tumor formation by interacting with the beta-catenin pathway. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 136:229-32. [PubMed: 23026511]  [MGI Ref ID J:198987]

Johnson LE; DeLuca HF. 2001. Vitamin D receptor null mutant mice fed high levels of calcium are fertile. J Nutr 131(6):1787-91. [PubMed: 11385068]  [MGI Ref ID J:69822]

Kallay E; Bises G; Bajna E; Bieglmayer C; Gerdenitsch W; Steffan I; Kato S; Armbrecht HJ; Cross HS. 2005. Colon-specific regulation of vitamin D hydroxylases--a possible approach for tumor prevention. Carcinogenesis 26(9):1581-9. [PubMed: 15905206]  [MGI Ref ID J:100745]

Kallay E; Pietschmann P; Toyokuni S; Bajna E; Hahn P; Mazzucco K; Bieglmayer C; Kato S; Cross HS. 2001. Characterization of a vitamin D receptor knockout mouse as a model of colorectal hyperproliferation and DNA damage. Carcinogenesis 22(9):1429-35. [PubMed: 11532865]  [MGI Ref ID J:71459]

Kalueff A; Loseva E; Haapasalo H; Rantala I; Keranen J; Lou YR; Minasyan A; Keisala T; Miettinen S; Kuuslahti M; Tuchimaa P. 2006. Thalamic calcification in vitamin D receptor knockout mice. Neuroreport 17(7):717-21. [PubMed: 16641675]  [MGI Ref ID J:108897]

Kalueff AV; Keisala T; Minasyan A; Kuuslahti M; Miettinen S; Tuohimaa P. 2006. Behavioural anomalies in mice evoked by 'Tokyo' disruption of the Vitamin D receptor gene. Neurosci Res 54(4):254-60. [PubMed: 16427152]  [MGI Ref ID J:107222]

Kalueff AV; Keisala T; Minasyan A; Kuuslahti M; Tuohimaa P. 2006. Temporal stability of novelty exploration in mice exposed to different open field tests. Behav Processes 72(1):104-12. [PubMed: 16442749]  [MGI Ref ID J:112776]

Kalueff AV; Lou YR; Laaksi I; Tuohimaa P. 2005. Abnormal behavioral organization of grooming in mice lacking the vitamin D receptor gene. J Neurogenet 19(1):1-24. [PubMed: 16076629]  [MGI Ref ID J:109821]

Kalueff AV; Lou YR; Laaksi I; Tuohimaa P. 2004. Impaired motor performance in mice lacking neurosteroid vitamin D receptors. Brain Res Bull 64(1):25-9. [PubMed: 15275953]  [MGI Ref ID J:101875]

Kalueff AV; Lou YR; Laaksi I; Tuohimaa P. 2004. Increased anxiety in mice lacking vitamin D receptor gene. Neuroreport 15(8):1271-4. [PubMed: 15167547]  [MGI Ref ID J:102263]

Kalueff AV; Minasyan A; Keisala T; Kuuslahti M; Miettinen S; Tuohimaa P. 2006. Increased severity of chemically induced seizures in mice with partially deleted Vitamin D receptor gene. Neurosci Lett 394(1):69-73. [PubMed: 16256271]  [MGI Ref ID J:105794]

Kato S; Takeyama K; Kitanaka S; Murayama A; Sekine K; Yoshizawa T. 1999. In vivo function of VDR in gene expression-VDR knock-out mice. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 69(1-6):247-51. [PubMed: 10418998]  [MGI Ref ID J:56034]

Kawamori Y; Katayama Y; Asada N; Minagawa K; Sato M; Okamura A; Shimoyama M; Nakagawa K; Okano T; Tanimoto M; Kato S; Matsui T. 2010. Role for vitamin D receptor in the neuronal control of the hematopoietic stem cell niche. Blood 116(25):5528-35. [PubMed: 20813899]  [MGI Ref ID J:167420]

Keisala T; Minasyan A; Jarvelin U; Wang J; Hamalainen T; Kalueff AV; Tuohimaa P. 2007. Aberrant nest building and prolactin secretion in vitamin D receptor mutant mice. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 104(3-5):269-73. [PubMed: 17467982]  [MGI Ref ID J:122806]

Keisala T; Minasyan A; Lou YR; Zou J; Kalueff AV; Pyykko I; Tuohimaa P. 2009. Premature aging in vitamin D receptor mutant mice. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 115(3-5):91-7. [PubMed: 19500727]  [MGI Ref ID J:151425]

Kinuta K; Tanaka H; Moriwake T; Aya K; Kato S; Seino Y. 2000. Vitamin D is an important factor in estrogen biosynthesis of both female and male gonads. Endocrinology 141(4):1317-24. [PubMed: 10746634]  [MGI Ref ID J:83237]

Kong J; Li XJ; Gavin D; Jiang Y; Li YC. 2002. Targeted expression of human vitamin d receptor in the skin promotes the initiation of the postnatal hair follicle cycle and rescues the alopecia in vitamin d receptor null mice. J Invest Dermatol 118(4):631-8. [PubMed: 11918709]  [MGI Ref ID J:75902]

Lezot F; Descroix V; Mesbah M; Hotton D; Blin C; Papagerakis P; Mauro N; Kato S; MacDougall M; Sharpe P; Berdal A. 2002. Cross-talk between Msx/Dlx homeobox genes and vitamin D during tooth mineralization. Connect Tissue Res 43(2-3):509-14. [PubMed: 12489206]  [MGI Ref ID J:103313]

Li M; Chiba H; Warot X; Messaddeq N; Gerard C; Chambon P; Metzger D. 2001. RXR-alpha ablation in skin keratinocytes results in alopecia and epidermal alterations. Development 128(5):675-88. [PubMed: 11171393]  [MGI Ref ID J:67149]

Li M; Hener P; Zhang Z; Kato S; Metzger D; Chambon P. 2006. Topical vitamin D3 and low-calcemic analogs induce thymic stromal lymphopoietin in mouse keratinocytes and trigger an atopic dermatitis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103(31):11736-41. [PubMed: 16880407]  [MGI Ref ID J:111828]

Li M; Indra AK; Warot X; Brocard J; Messaddeq N; Kato S; Metzger D; Chambon P. 2000. Skin abnormalities generated by temporally controlled RXRalpha mutations in mouse epidermis. Nature 407(6804):633-6. [PubMed: 11034212]  [MGI Ref ID J:65109]

Lou YR; Molnar F; Perakyla M; Qiao S; Kalueff AV; St-Arnaud R; Carlberg C; Tuohimaa P. 2010. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D(3) is an agonistic vitamin D receptor ligand. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 118(3):162-70. [PubMed: 19944755]  [MGI Ref ID J:161015]

Masuyama R; Nakaya Y; Katsumata S; Kajita Y; Uehara M; Tanaka S; Sakai A; Kato S; Nakamura T; Suzuki K. 2003. Dietary calcium and phosphorus ratio regulates bone mineralization and turnover in vitamin D receptor knockout mice by affecting intestinal calcium and phosphorus absorption. J Bone Miner Res 18(7):1217-26. [PubMed: 12854831]  [MGI Ref ID J:111474]

Mathieu C; Van Etten E; Gysemans C; Decallonne B; Kato S; Laureys J; Depovere J; Valckx D; Verstuyf A; Bouillon R. 2001. In vitro and in vivo analysis of the immune system of vitamin D receptor knockout mice. J Bone Miner Res 16(11):2057-65. [PubMed: 11697802]  [MGI Ref ID J:112519]

Mayne CG; Spanier JA; Relland LM; Williams CB; Hayes CE. 2011. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 acts directly on the T lymphocyte vitamin D receptor to inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Eur J Immunol 41(3):822-32. [PubMed: 21287548]  [MGI Ref ID J:175424]

Meehan TF; DeLuca HF. 2002. The vitamin D receptor is necessary for 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice. Arch Biochem Biophys 408(2):200-4. [PubMed: 12464272]  [MGI Ref ID J:80812]

Minasyan A; Keisala T; Lou YR; Kalueff AV; Tuohimaa P. 2007. Neophobia, sensory and cognitive functions, and hedonic responses in vitamin D receptor mutant mice. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 104(3-5):274-80. [PubMed: 17482806]  [MGI Ref ID J:122760]

Minasyan A; Keisala T; Zou J; Zhang Y; Toppila E; Syvala H; Lou YR; Kalueff AV; Pyykko I; Tuohimaa P. 2009. Vestibular dysfunction in vitamin D receptor mutant mice. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 114(3-5):161-6. [PubMed: 19429446]  [MGI Ref ID J:150368]

Murayama A; Takeyama K; Kitanaka S; Kodera Y; Kawaguchi Y; Hosoya T; Kato S. 1999. Positive and negative regulations of the renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 1alpha-hydroxylase gene by parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 in intact animals. Endocrinology 140(5):2224-31. [PubMed: 10218975]  [MGI Ref ID J:114260]

Nakagawa K; Sasaki Y; Kato S; Kubodera N; Okano T. 2005. 22-Oxa-1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibits metastasis and angiogenesis in lung cancer. Carcinogenesis 26(6):1044-54. [PubMed: 15718253]  [MGI Ref ID J:98822]

O'Kelly J; Hisatake J; Hisatake Y; Bishop J; Norman A; Koeffler HP. 2002. Normal myelopoiesis but abnormal T lymphocyte responses in vitamin D receptor knockout mice. J Clin Invest 109(8):1091-9. [PubMed: 11956247]  [MGI Ref ID J:76087]

Palmer HG; Anjos-Afonso F; Carmeliet G; Takeda H; Watt FM. 2008. The Vitamin D Receptor Is a Wnt Effector that Controls Hair Follicle Differentiation and Specifies Tumor Type in Adult Epidermis. PLoS ONE 3(1):e1483. [PubMed: 18213391]  [MGI Ref ID J:131616]

Segawa H; Kaneko I; Yamanaka S; Ito M; Kuwahata M; Inoue Y; Kato S; Miyamoto K. 2004. Intestinal Na-P(i) cotransporter adaptation to dietary P(i) content in vitamin D receptor null mice. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 287(1):F39-47. [PubMed: 14996670]  [MGI Ref ID J:95427]

Song Y; Fleet JC. 2007. Intestinal resistance to 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D in mice heterozygous for the vitamin D receptor knockout allele. Endocrinology 148(3):1396-402. [PubMed: 17110426]  [MGI Ref ID J:129578]

Song Y; Kato S; Fleet JC. 2003. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) knockout mice reveal VDR-independent regulation of intestinal calcium absorption and ECaC2 and calbindin D9k mRNA. J Nutr 133(2):374-80. [PubMed: 12566470]  [MGI Ref ID J:119318]

Takeda S; Yoshizawa T; Nagai Y; Yamato H; Fukumoto S; Sekine K ; Kato S ; Matsumoto T ; Fujita T. 1999. Stimulation of osteoclast formation by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D requires its binding to vitamin D receptor (VDR) in osteoblastic cells: studies using VDR knockout mice. Endocrinology 140(2):1005-8. [PubMed: 9927335]  [MGI Ref ID J:52911]

Takeyama K; Kitanaka S; Sato T; Kobori M; Yanagisawa J; Kato S. 1997. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 1alpha-hydroxylase and vitamin D synthesis. Science 277(5333):1827-30. [PubMed: 9295274]  [MGI Ref ID J:43146]

Tanaka H; Seino Y. 2004. Direct action of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D on bone: VDRKO bone shows excessive bone formation in normal mineral condition. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 89-90:343-5. [PubMed: 15225798]  [MGI Ref ID J:91345]

Teichert AE; Elalieh H; Elias PM; Welsh J; Bikle DD. 2011. Overexpression of hedgehog signaling is associated with epidermal tumor formation in vitamin D receptor-null mice. J Invest Dermatol 131(11):2289-97. [PubMed: 21814234]  [MGI Ref ID J:182177]

Van Cromphaut SJ; Dewerchin M; Hoenderop JG; Stockmans I; Van Herck E; Kato S; Bindels RJ; Collen D; Carmeliet P; Bouillon R; Carmeliet G. 2001. Duodenal calcium absorption in vitamin D receptor-knockout mice: functional and molecular aspects. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98(23):13324-9. [PubMed: 11687634]  [MGI Ref ID J:72578]

Wang Y; Becklund BR; DeLuca HF. 2010. Identification of a highly specific and versatile vitamin D receptor antibody. Arch Biochem Biophys 494(2):166-77. [PubMed: 19951695]  [MGI Ref ID J:158462]

Wittke A; Chang A; Froicu M; Harandi OF; Weaver V; August A; Paulson RF; Cantorna MT. 2007. Vitamin D receptor expression by the lung micro-environment is required for maximal induction of lung inflammation. Arch Biochem Biophys 460(2):306-13. [PubMed: 17224129]  [MGI Ref ID J:123350]

Wittke A; Weaver V; Mahon BD; August A; Cantorna MT. 2004. Vitamin D receptor-deficient mice fail to develop experimental allergic asthma. J Immunol 173(5):3432-6. [PubMed: 15322208]  [MGI Ref ID J:92710]

Xie Z; Komuves L; Yu QC; Elalieh H; Ng DC; Leary C; Chang S; Crumrine D; Yoshizawa T; Kato S; Bikle DD. 2002. Lack of the vitamin D receptor is associated with reduced epidermal differentiation and hair follicle growth. J Invest Dermatol 118(1):11-6. [PubMed: 11851870]  [MGI Ref ID J:110729]

Xue Y; Fleet JC. 2009. Intestinal vitamin D receptor is required for normal calcium and bone metabolism in mice. Gastroenterology 136(4):1317-27, e1-2. [PubMed: 19254681]  [MGI Ref ID J:148188]

Yagishita N; Yamamoto Y; Yoshizawa T; Sekine K; Uematsu Y; Murayama H; Nagai Y; Krezel W; Chambon P; Matsumoto T; Kato S. 2001. Aberrant growth plate development in VDR/RXR gamma double null mutant mice. Endocrinology 142(12):5332-41. [PubMed: 11713233]  [MGI Ref ID J:108798]

Yu S; Zhao J; Cantorna MT. 2011. Invariant NKT cell defects in vitamin D receptor knockout mice prevents experimental lung inflammation. J Immunol 187(9):4907-12. [PubMed: 21948983]  [MGI Ref ID J:179450]

Zanello LP; Norman AW. 2004. Rapid modulation of osteoblast ion channel responses by 1alpha,25(OH)2-vitamin D3 requires the presence of a functional vitamin D nuclear receptor. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101(6):1589-94. [PubMed: 14757825]  [MGI Ref ID J:88155]

Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $2525.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3283.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

General Supply Notes

Control Information

  Control
   Wild-type from the colony
   001976 NOD/ShiLtJ
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
Surgical and Preconditioning Services
JAX® Services
Customer Services and Support
Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
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Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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