Strain Name:

CByJ.129S2(B6)-Cd40lgtm1Imx/J

Stock Number:

007074

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Availability:

Cryopreserved - Ready for recovery

Mice homozygous for this Cd40lg (CD40 ligand), Cd40lg tm1Imx, targeted mutation may be useful for studying immune system physiology, response to prion infection, neurodegeneration, apoptosis and Immunodeficiency with Hyper-IgM, Type 1.

Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Specieslaboratory mouse
 
Donating Investigator IMR Colony,   The Jackson Laboratory

Description
Mice homozygous for the targeted mutation are viable and fertile. Homozygous mutant mice show no overt phenotypic abnormalities. Percentages of B and T cell subpopulations is normal. Homozygotes do show selective deficiencies in humoral immunity (low basal serum isotype levels and undetectable IgE) as well as abnormal secondary antigen-specific responses to immunization with a thymus-dependent antigen. The phenotype of the mice resembles human X-linked hyper IgM syndrome. This mutant mouse strain may be useful in studies of immune system physiology, response to prion infection, neurodegeneration, apoptosis and Immunodeficiency with Hyper-IgM, Type 1.

In an attempt to offer alleles on well-characterized or multiple genetic backgrounds, alleles are frequently moved to a genetic background different from that on which an allele was first characterized. This is the case for the strain above. It should be noted that the phenotype could vary from that originally described. We will modify the strain description if necessary as published results become available.

Development
A targeting vector containing a PGKneo cassette was used to replace exons 3 and 4. The construct was electroporated into 129S2/SvPas derived D3 embryonic stem (ES) cells. Correctly targeted ES cells were injected into C57BL/6 blastocysts. The resulting male chimeric animals were crossed to C57BL/6 female mice. Heterozygous (129/SV X C57BL/6)F1 females were crossed to C57BL/6 males to generate hemizygous males. The mice were subsequently backcrossed on to the C57BL/6J (and/or C57BL/6N) genetic background for five generations. The mice were next backcrossed to BALB/cByJ (Stock No. 001026) using a speed congenic protocol to produce this strain.

Control Information

  Control
   001026 BALB/cByJ
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying   Cd40lgtm1Imx allele
002770   B6.129S2-Cd40lgtm1Imx/J
002428   B6;129S-Cd40lgtm1Imx/J
View Strains carrying   Cd40lgtm1Imx     (2 strains)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
- No similarity to the expected human disease phenotype was found. One or more human genes are associated with this human disease. The mouse genotype may involve mutations to orthologs of one or more of these genes, but the phenotype did not resemble the disease.
Immunodeficiency with Hyper-IgM, Type 1; HIGM1
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Cd40lgtm1Imx/Cd40lgtm1Imx

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * C57BL/6J * BALB/c
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal T cell clonal deletion
    • mice show complete rescue of CD8+ and CD4+ V beta11+ and beta6+ bearing CD4+ and CD8+ thymocytes from deletion in the thymus and periphery and Vbeta5+ CD4+ cells, but not Vbeta5+ bearing CD8+ thymocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:110925)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal T cell clonal deletion
    • mice show complete rescue of CD8+ and CD4+ V beta11+ and beta6+ bearing CD4+ and CD8+ thymocytes from deletion in the thymus and periphery and Vbeta5+ CD4+ cells, but not Vbeta5+ bearing CD8+ thymocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:110925)

Cd40lgtm1Imx/Cd40lgtm1Imx

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * C57BL/6
  • reproductive system phenotype
  • *normal* reproductive system phenotype
    • homozygous females are viable and fertile   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal blood coagulation
    • thrombi formed in response to FeCl3 injury are fragile and prone to rupture and to embolizing   (MGI Ref ID J:75152)
    • smaller thrombi with lower platelet density   (MGI Ref ID J:75152)
    • clotting times are normal   (MGI Ref ID J:75152)
  • immune system phenotype
  • increased susceptibility to prion infection
    • early onset of disease when infected with scrapie   (MGI Ref ID J:115487)
    • succumb to infection after 144 days as opposed to 184 days for controls   (MGI Ref ID J:115487)
    • symptoms of scrapie infection equivalent to 1000X higher dose   (MGI Ref ID J:115487)
  • microgliosis
    • increased microgliosis   (MGI Ref ID J:115487)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal nervous system physiology   (MGI Ref ID J:115487)
  • loss of cortex neurons
    • more severe loss of parvalbumin positive neurons in the cortex as a result of scrapie infection than occurs in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:115487)
  • microgliosis
    • increased microgliosis   (MGI Ref ID J:115487)
  • neurodegeneration
    • increased apoptosis   (MGI Ref ID J:115487)
    • spongiform encephalopathy
      • vacuolation resulting from scrapie infection more pronounced than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:115487)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • microgliosis
    • increased microgliosis   (MGI Ref ID J:115487)

Cd40lgtm1Imx/Y

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * C57BL/6
  • immune system phenotype
  • *normal* immune system phenotype
    • serum IgM and IgG3 levels are more or less normal at all ages   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
    • abnormal immune system organ morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
      • abnormal lymph node morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
        • absent lymph node germinal center
          • failure to form germinal centers in inguinal lymph nodes although primary follicle formation is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
        • lymph node hypoplasia
          • about 1/3 that of controls while overall T and B cell numbers are normal   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
      • absent spleen germinal center
        • failure to form germinal centers   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
    • abnormal immune system physiology   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
      • abnormal antigen presentation
        • unable to mount a secondary response to TNP-KLH antigen (T cell dependent)   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
        • T cell independent responses are normal as is isotype switching for these antigens   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
      • abnormal class switch recombination   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
      • decreased immunoglobulin level   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
        • decreased IgA level   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
        • decreased IgE level
          • undetectable   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
        • decreased IgG1 level   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
        • decreased IgG2b level   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal class switch recombination   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
  • absent spleen germinal center
    • failure to form germinal centers   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
  • decreased immunoglobulin level   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
    • decreased IgA level   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
    • decreased IgE level
      • undetectable   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
    • decreased IgG1 level   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)
    • decreased IgG2b level   (MGI Ref ID J:21137)

Cd40lgtm1Imx/Y

        B6.129S2-Cd40lgtm1Imx/J
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal thalamus morphology
    • loss of neurons in the submedial thalamic nucleus due to thiamine deficiency slower than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:106362)
    • after 11 days of thiamine deficiency, neuron loss in the submedial thalamic nucleus due to thiamine deficiency is about 90%   (MGI Ref ID J:106362)
  • decreased cerebral infarction size
    • significantly reduced infarct volumes   (MGI Ref ID J:108988)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte adhesion
    • reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion   (MGI Ref ID J:108988)
  • decreased platelet aggregation
    • reduced number of rolling platelets and 50% attenuation in platelet adhesion following 1 hour of middle cerebral artery occlusion and 4 hours of reperfusion   (MGI Ref ID J:108988)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • decreased cerebral infarction size
    • significantly reduced infarct volumes   (MGI Ref ID J:108988)
  • decreased platelet aggregation
    • reduced number of rolling platelets and 50% attenuation in platelet adhesion following 1 hour of middle cerebral artery occlusion and 4 hours of reperfusion   (MGI Ref ID J:108988)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte adhesion
    • reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion   (MGI Ref ID J:108988)
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte adhesion
    • reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion   (MGI Ref ID J:108988)

Cd40lgtm1Imx/Y

        B6.129S2-Cd40lgtm1Imx/J
  • skeleton phenotype
  • decreased bone mineral density
    • significantly reduced   (MGI Ref ID J:145330)
  • decreased compact bone mass
    • significantly reduced   (MGI Ref ID J:145330)
  • decreased trabecular bone mass
    • significantly reduced   (MGI Ref ID J:145330)

Cd40lgtm1Imx/Y

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * C57BL/6
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • decreased platelet aggregation
    • reduced shear induced platelet aggregation   (MGI Ref ID J:103954)
    • reduced in vitro platelet aggregation   (MGI Ref ID J:103954)
  • increased bleeding time
    • significantly prolonged tail vein bleeding times   (MGI Ref ID J:103954)
  • thrombosis
    • significantly delayed blood vessel occlusion   (MGI Ref ID J:103954)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • *normal* hematopoietic system phenotype
    • normal platelet counts   (MGI Ref ID J:103954)
    • decreased platelet aggregation
      • reduced shear induced platelet aggregation   (MGI Ref ID J:103954)
      • reduced in vitro platelet aggregation   (MGI Ref ID J:103954)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • abnormal vascular endothelial cell morphology
    • carotid artery intimal thickening is increased over controls 21 days after collar placement around the carotid artery   (MGI Ref ID J:115587)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
CD Antigens, Antigen Receptors, and Histocompatibility Markers
Lymphoid Tissue Defects

Neurobiology Research
Neurodegeneration

Cd40lgtm1Imx related

Cancer Research
Genes Regulating Growth and Proliferation

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
CD Antigens, Antigen Receptors, and Histocompatibility Markers

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Cd40lgtm1Imx
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Immunex
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Common Name(s) CD154-; CD40L-; CD40LKO; Tnfsf5tm1Imx;
Mutation Made ByDr. Jacques Peschon,   Amgen
Strain of Origin129S2/SvPas
ES Cell Line NameD3
ES Cell Line Strain129S2/SvPas
Gene Symbol and Name Cd40lg, CD40 ligand
Chromosome X
Gene Common Name(s) CD154; CD40 antigen ligand; CD40L; Cd40l; HIGM1; IGM; IMD3; Ly-62; Ly62; T-BAM; TNFSF5; TRAP; Tnfsf5; gp39; hCD40L; lymphocyte antigen 62; tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 5;
Molecular Note Exons 3 and 4 were replaced with a neomycin cassette. Homozygous mutant animals fail to express functional protein on the cell surface. [MGI Ref ID J:21137]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Cd40lg tm1 Imx (Tnfsf5) MCA, Melt Curve Analysis
Cd40lgtm1Imx-Alternate1, Standard PCR
Cd40lgtm1Imx, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Renshaw BR; Fanslow WC 3rd; Armitage RJ; Campbell KA; Liggitt D; Wright B; Davison BL; Maliszewski CR. 1994. Humoral immune responses in CD40 ligand-deficient mice. J Exp Med 180(5):1889-900. [PubMed: 7964465]  [MGI Ref ID J:21137]

Additional References

Cd40lgtm1Imx related

Amrani A; Serra P; Yamanouchi J; Han B; Thiessen S; Verdaguer J; Santamaria P. 2002. CD154-dependent priming of diabetogenic CD4(+) T cells dissociated from activation of antigen-presenting cells. Immunity 16(5):719-32. [PubMed: 12049723]  [MGI Ref ID J:76802]

Andersen C; Jensen T; Nansen A; Marker O; Thomsen AR. 1999. CD4(+) T cell-mediated protection against a lethal outcome of systemic infection with vesicular stomatitis virus requires CD40 ligand expression, but not IFN-gamma or IL-4. Int Immunol 11(12):2035-42. [PubMed: 10590269]  [MGI Ref ID J:110491]

Andre P; Prasad KS; Denis CV; He M; Papalia JM; Hynes RO; Phillips DR; Wagner DD. 2002. CD40L stabilizes arterial thrombi by a beta3 integrin--dependent mechanism. Nat Med 8(3):247-52. [PubMed: 11875495]  [MGI Ref ID J:75152]

Andreasen SO; Christensen JE; Marker O; Thomsen AR. 2000. Role of CD40 ligand and CD28 in induction and maintenance of antiviral CD8+ effector T cell responses. J Immunol 164(7):3689-97. [PubMed: 10725727]  [MGI Ref ID J:123023]

Ballesteros-Tato A; Leon B; Lund FE; Randall TD. 2013. CD4+ T helper cells use CD154-CD40 interactions to counteract T reg cell-mediated suppression of CD8+ T cell responses to influenza. J Exp Med 210(8):1591-601. [PubMed: 23835849]  [MGI Ref ID J:202249]

Banczyk D; Kalies K; Nachbar L; Bergmann L; Schmidt P; Bode U; Teegen B; Steven P; Lange T; Textor J; Ludwig RJ; Stocker W; Konig P; Bell E; Westermann J. 2014. Activated CD4+ T cells enter the splenic T-cell zone and induce autoantibody-producing germinal centers through bystander activation. Eur J Immunol 44(1):93-102. [PubMed: 24114675]  [MGI Ref ID J:208655]

Barazzone Argiroffo C; Donati YR; Boccard J; Rochat AF; Vesin C; Kan CD; Piguet PF. 2002. CD40-CD40 ligand disruption does not prevent hyperoxia-induced injury. Am J Pathol 160(1):67-71. [PubMed: 11786400]  [MGI Ref ID J:108197]

Belkaid Y; Mendez S; Lira R; Kadambi N; Milon G; Sacks D. 2000. A natural model of Leishmania major infection reveals a prolonged 'silent' phase of parasite amplification in the skin before the onset of lesion formation and immunity. J Immunol 165(2):969-77. [PubMed: 10878373]  [MGI Ref ID J:120233]

Bry L; Brigl M; Brenner MB. 2006. CD4+-T-cell effector functions and costimulatory requirements essential for surviving mucosal infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Infect Immun 74(1):673-81. [PubMed: 16369024]  [MGI Ref ID J:104251]

Burwinkel M; Schwarz A; Riemer C; Schultz J; van Landeghem F; Baier M. 2004. Rapid disease development in scrapie-infected mice deficient for CD40 ligand. EMBO Rep 5(5):527-31. [PubMed: 15071493]  [MGI Ref ID J:115487]

Campos-Neto A; Ovendale P; Bement T; Koppi TA; Fanslow WC; Rossi MA; Alderson MR. 1998. CD40 ligand is not essential for the development of cell-mediated immunity and resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. J Immunol 160(5):2037-41. [PubMed: 9498737]  [MGI Ref ID J:123032]

Chan K; Lee DJ; Schubert A; Tang CM; Crain B; Schoenberger SP; Corr M. 2001. The roles of MHC class II, CD40, and B7 costimulation in CTL induction by plasmid DNA. J Immunol 166(5):3061-6. [PubMed: 11207256]  [MGI Ref ID J:126695]

Chen L; Cheng W; Shivshankar P; Lei L; Zhang X; Wu Y; Yeh IT; Zhong G. 2009. Distinct roles of CD28- and CD40 ligand-mediated costimulation in the development of protective immunity and pathology during Chlamydia muridarum urogenital infection in mice. Infect Immun 77(7):3080-9. [PubMed: 19398542]  [MGI Ref ID J:150306]

Chougnet C; Freitag C; Schito M; Thomas EK; Sher A; Shearer GM. 2001. In vivo CD40-CD154 (CD40 ligand) interaction induces integrated HIV expression by APC in an HIV-1-transgenic mouse model. J Immunol 166(5):3210-7. [PubMed: 11207274]  [MGI Ref ID J:126480]

Christensen JE; Christensen JP; Kristensen NN; Hansen NJ; Stryhn A; Thomsen AR. 2002. Role of CD28 co-stimulation in generation and maintenance of virus-specific T cells. Int Immunol 14(7):701-11. [PubMed: 12096029]  [MGI Ref ID J:113535]

Crow AR; Leytin V; Starkey AF; Rand ML; Lazarus AH. 2003. CD154 (CD40 ligand)-deficient mice exhibit prolonged bleeding time and decreased shear-induced platelet aggregates. J Thromb Haemost 1(4):850-2. [PubMed: 12871426]  [MGI Ref ID J:103954]

Davidson MG; Alonso MN; Kenkel JA; Suhoski MM; Gonzalez JC; Yuan R; Engleman EG. 2013. In vivo T cell activation induces the formation of CD209(+) PDL-2(+) dendritic cells. PLoS One 8(10):e76258. [PubMed: 24098455]  [MGI Ref ID J:209037]

Davidson MG; Alonso MN; Yuan R; Axtell RC; Kenkel JA; Suhoski MM; Gonzalez JC; Steinman L; Engleman EG. 2013. Th17 cells induce Th1-polarizing monocyte-derived dendritic cells. J Immunol 191(3):1175-87. [PubMed: 23794631]  [MGI Ref ID J:205439]

De Santo C; Salio M; Masri SH; Lee LY; Dong T; Speak AO; Porubsky S; Booth S; Veerapen N; Besra GS; Grone HJ; Platt FM; Zambon M; Cerundolo V. 2008. Invariant NKT cells reduce the immunosuppressive activity of influenza A virus-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice and humans. J Clin Invest 118(12):4036-48. [PubMed: 19033672]  [MGI Ref ID J:144728]

Deenick EK; Chan A; Ma CS; Gatto D; Schwartzberg PL; Brink R; Tangye SG. 2010. Follicular helper T cell differentiation requires continuous antigen presentation that is independent of unique B cell signaling. Immunity 33(2):241-53. [PubMed: 20691615]  [MGI Ref ID J:163920]

Demirci G; Amanullah F; Kewalaramani R; Yagita H; Strom TB; Sayegh MH; Li XC. 2004. Critical role of OX40 in CD28 and CD154-independent rejection. J Immunol 172(3):1691-8. [PubMed: 14734751]  [MGI Ref ID J:87657]

Desanti GE; Cowan JE; Baik S; Parnell SM; White AJ; Penninger JM; Lane PJ; Jenkinson EJ; Jenkinson WE; Anderson G. 2012. Developmentally Regulated Availability of RANKL and CD40 Ligand Reveals Distinct Mechanisms of Fetal and Adult Cross-Talk in the Thymus Medulla. J Immunol 189(12):5519-26. [PubMed: 23152561]  [MGI Ref ID J:190854]

Dibra D; Cutrera JJ; Li S. 2012. Coordination between TLR9 signaling in macrophages and CD3 signaling in T cells induces robust expression of IL-30. J Immunol 188(8):3709-15. [PubMed: 22407920]  [MGI Ref ID J:184078]

Ding C; Cai Y; Marroquin J; Ildstad ST; Yan J. 2009. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells regulate autoreactive B cell activation via soluble factors and in a cell-to-cell contact manner. J Immunol 183(11):7140-9. [PubMed: 19890051]  [MGI Ref ID J:157399]

Dole VS; Bergmeier W; Mitchell HA; Eichenberger SC; Wagner DD. 2005. Activated platelets induce Weibel-Palade-body secretion and leukocyte rolling in vivo: role of P-selectin. Blood 106(7):2334-9. [PubMed: 15956287]  [MGI Ref ID J:119376]

Dudakov JA; Hanash AM; Jenq RR; Young LF; Ghosh A; Singer NV; West ML; Smith OM; Holland AM; Tsai JJ; Boyd RL; van den Brink MR. 2012. Interleukin-22 drives endogenous thymic regeneration in mice. Science 336(6077):91-5. [PubMed: 22383805]  [MGI Ref ID J:182233]

Elzey BD; Grant JF; Sinn HW; Nieswandt B; Waldschmidt TJ; Ratliff TL. 2005. Cooperation between platelet-derived CD154 and CD4+ T cells for enhanced germinal center formation. J Leukoc Biol 78(1):80-4. [PubMed: 15899982]  [MGI Ref ID J:99287]

Elzey BD; Tian J; Jensen RJ; Swanson AK; Lees JR; Lentz SR; Stein CS; Nieswandt B; Wang Y; Davidson BL; Ratliff TL. 2003. Platelet-mediated modulation of adaptive immunity. A communication link between innate and adaptive immune compartments. Immunity 19(1):9-19. [PubMed: 12871635]  [MGI Ref ID J:84573]

Erickson LD; Foy TM; Waldschmidt TJ. 2001. Murine B1 B cells require IL-5 for optimal T cell-dependent activation. J Immunol 166(3):1531-9. [PubMed: 11160193]  [MGI Ref ID J:127070]

Fang M; Sigal LJ. 2005. Antibodies and CD8+ T cells are complementary and essential for natural resistance to a highly lethal cytopathic virus. J Immunol 175(10):6829-36. [PubMed: 16272340]  [MGI Ref ID J:119697]

Fischbein MP; Ardehali A; Yun J; Schoenberger S; Laks H; Irie Y; Dempsey P; Cheng G; Fishbein MC; Bonavida B. 2000. CD40 signaling replaces CD4+ lymphocytes and its blocking prevents chronic rejection of heart transplants. J Immunol 165(12):7316-22. [PubMed: 11120867]  [MGI Ref ID J:118395]

Frentsch M; Stark R; Matzmohr N; Meier S; Durlanik S; Schulz AR; Stervbo U; Jurchott K; Gebhardt F; Heine G; Reuter MA; Betts MR; Busch D; Thiel A. 2013. CD40L expression permits CD8+ T cells to execute immunologic helper functions. Blood 122(3):405-12. [PubMed: 23719298]  [MGI Ref ID J:201344]

Gaspal FM; McConnell FM; Kim MY; Gray D; Kosco-Vilbois MH; Raykundalia CR; Botto M; Lane PJ. 2006. The generation of thymus-independent germinal centers depends on CD40 but not on CD154, the T cell-derived CD40-ligand. Eur J Immunol 36(7):1665-73. [PubMed: 16783845]  [MGI Ref ID J:115798]

Gilbert MR; Wagner NJ; Jones SZ; Wisz AB; Roques JR; Krum KN; Lee SR; Nickeleit V; Hulbert C; Thomas JW; Gauld SB; Vilen BJ. 2012. Autoreactive preplasma cells break tolerance in the absence of regulation by dendritic cells and macrophages. J Immunol 189(2):711-20. [PubMed: 22675201]  [MGI Ref ID J:189561]

Golovkina TV; Shlomchik M; Hannum L; Chervonsky A. 1999. Organogenic role of B lymphocytes in mucosal immunity. Science 286(5446):1965-8. [PubMed: 10583962]  [MGI Ref ID J:124532]

Gorbachev AV; Heeger PS; Fairchild RL. 2001. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell priming for contact hypersensitivity occurs independently of CD40-CD154 interactions. J Immunol 166(4):2323-32. [PubMed: 11160289]  [MGI Ref ID J:126997]

Hao S; Yuan J; Xiang J. 2007. Nonspecific CD4+ T cells with uptake of antigen-specific dendritic cell-released exosomes stimulate antigen-specific CD8+ CTL responses and long-term T cell memory. J Leukoc Biol 82(4):829-38. [PubMed: 17626150]  [MGI Ref ID J:125204]

Hastey CJ; Elsner RA; Barthold SW; Baumgarth N. 2012. Delays and diversions mark the development of B cell responses to Borrelia burgdorferi infection. J Immunol 188(11):5612-22. [PubMed: 22547698]  [MGI Ref ID J:188726]

Hermans IF; Silk JD; Gileadi U; Salio M; Mathew B; Ritter G; Schmidt R; Harris AL; Old L; Cerundolo V. 2003. NKT cells enhance CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to soluble antigen in vivo through direct interaction with dendritic cells. J Immunol 171(10):5140-7. [PubMed: 14607913]  [MGI Ref ID J:119212]

Hernandez MG; Shen L; Rock KL. 2007. CD40-CD40 ligand interaction between dendritic cells and CD8+ T cells is needed to stimulate maximal T cell responses in the absence of CD4+ T cell help. J Immunol 178(5):2844-52. [PubMed: 17312128]  [MGI Ref ID J:144111]

Hernandez-Novoa B; Bishop L; Logun C; Munson PJ; Elnekave E; Rangel ZG; Barb J; Danner RL; Kovacs JA. 2008. Immune responses to Pneumocystis murina are robust in healthy mice but largely absent in CD40 ligand-deficient mice. J Leukoc Biol 84(2):420-30. [PubMed: 18467653]  [MGI Ref ID J:138448]

Hu HM; Winter H; Ma J; Croft M; Urba WJ; Fox BA. 2002. CD28, TNF receptor, and IL-12 are critical for CD4-independent cross-priming of therapeutic antitumor CD8+ T cells. J Immunol 169(9):4897-904. [PubMed: 12391201]  [MGI Ref ID J:118780]

Iannacone M; Sitia G; Isogawa M; Whitmire JK; Marchese P; Chisari FV; Ruggeri ZM; Guidotti LG. 2008. Platelets prevent IFN-alpha/beta-induced lethal hemorrhage promoting CTL-dependent clearance of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105(2):629-34. [PubMed: 18184798]  [MGI Ref ID J:131089]

Inoue M; Arikawa T; Chen YH; Moriwaki Y; Price M; Brown M; Perfect JR; Shinohara ML. 2014. T cells down-regulate macrophage TNF production by IRAK1-mediated IL-10 expression and control innate hyperinflammation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111(14):5295-300. [PubMed: 24706909]  [MGI Ref ID J:208867]

Ishikawa M; Vowinkel T; Stokes KY; Arumugam TV; Yilmaz G; Nanda A; Granger DN. 2005. CD40/CD40 ligand signaling in mouse cerebral microvasculature after focal ischemia/reperfusion. Circulation 111(13):1690-6. [PubMed: 15795333]  [MGI Ref ID J:108988]

Jain A; Kovacs JA; Nelson DL; Migueles SA; Pittaluga S; Fanslow W; Fan X; Wong DW; Massey J; Hornung R; Brown MR; Spinner JJ; Liu S; Davey V; Hill HA; Ochs H; Fleisher TA. 2011. Partial immune reconstitution of X-linked hyper IgM syndrome with recombinant CD40 ligand. Blood 118(14):3811-7. [PubMed: 21841160]  [MGI Ref ID J:178404]

Jenkins SJ; Perona-Wright G; MacDonald AS. 2008. Full development of Th2 immunity requires both innate and adaptive sources of CD154. J Immunol 180(12):8083-92. [PubMed: 18523272]  [MGI Ref ID J:137237]

Jeurissen A; Billiau AD; Moens L; Shengqiao L; Landuyt W; Wuyts G; Boon L; Waer M; Ceuppens JL; Bossuyt X. 2006. CD4+ T lymphocytes expressing CD40 ligand help the IgM antibody response to soluble pneumococcal polysaccharides via an intermediate cell type. J Immunol 176(1):529-36. [PubMed: 16365447]  [MGI Ref ID J:126613]

Kamperschroer C; Roberts DM; Zhang Y; Weng NP; Swain SL. 2008. SAP enables T cells to help B cells by a mechanism distinct from Th cell programming or CD40 ligand regulation. J Immunol 181(6):3994-4003. [PubMed: 18768854]  [MGI Ref ID J:139100]

Ke ZJ; Calingasan NY; DeGiorgio LA; Volpe BT; Gibson GE. 2005. CD40-CD40L interactions promote neuronal death in a model of neurodegeneration due to mild impairment of oxidative metabolism. Neurochem Int 47(3):204-15. [PubMed: 15885854]  [MGI Ref ID J:106362]

Ke ZJ; Calingasan NY; Karuppagounder SS; DeGiorgio LA; Volpe BT; Gibson GE. 2005. CD40L deletion delays neuronal death in a model of neurodegeneration due to mild impairment of oxidative metabolism. J Neuroimmunol 164(1-2):85-92. [PubMed: 15904977]  [MGI Ref ID J:106388]

Kemball CC; Lee ED; Szomolanyi-Tsuda E; Pearson TC; Larsen CP; Lukacher AE. 2006. Costimulation requirements for antiviral CD8+ T cells differ for acute and persistent phases of polyoma virus infection. J Immunol 176(3):1814-24. [PubMed: 16424212]  [MGI Ref ID J:126419]

Khan WI; Motomura Y; Blennerhassett PA; Kanbayashi H; Varghese AK; El-Sharkawy RT; Gauldie J; Collins SM. 2005. Disruption of CD40-CD40 ligand pathway inhibits the development of intestinal muscle hypercontractility and protective immunity in nematode infection. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 288(1):G15-22. [PubMed: 15308470]  [MGI Ref ID J:96181]

Kilmon MA; Wagner NJ; Garland AL; Lin L; Aviszus K; Wysocki LJ; Vilen BJ. 2007. Macrophages prevent the differentiation of autoreactive B cells by secreting CD40 ligand and interleukin-6. Blood 110(5):1595-602. [PubMed: 17712049]  [MGI Ref ID J:145511]

Kim G; Levin M; Schoenberger SP; Sharpe A; Kronenberg M. 2007. Paradoxical effect of reduced costimulation in T cell-mediated colitis. J Immunol 178(9):5563-70. [PubMed: 17442938]  [MGI Ref ID J:145837]

Kline J; Zhang L; Battaglia L; Cohen KS; Gajewski TF. 2012. Cellular and molecular requirements for rejection of b16 melanoma in the setting of regulatory T cell depletion and homeostatic proliferation. J Immunol 188(6):2630-42. [PubMed: 22312128]  [MGI Ref ID J:181862]

Koguchi Y; Gardell JL; Thauland TJ; Parker DC. 2011. Cyclosporine-resistant, Rab27a-independent mobilization of intracellular preformed CD40 ligand mediates antigen-specific T cell help in vitro. J Immunol 187(2):626-34. [PubMed: 21677130]  [MGI Ref ID J:178036]

Koguchi Y; Thauland TJ; Slifka MK; Parker DC. 2007. Preformed CD40 ligand exists in secretory lysosomes in effector and memory CD4+ T cells and is quickly expressed on the cell surface in an antigen-specific manner. Blood 110(7):2520-7. [PubMed: 17595332]  [MGI Ref ID J:147015]

Kuraoka M; Holl TM; Liao D; Womble M; Cain DW; Reynolds AE; Kelsoe G. 2011. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase mediates central tolerance in B cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108(28):11560-5. [PubMed: 21700885]  [MGI Ref ID J:174408]

Kuraoka M; Liao D; Yang K; Allgood SD; Levesque MC; Kelsoe G; Ueda Y. 2009. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and activity in the absence of germinal centers: insights into hyper-IgM syndrome. J Immunol 183(5):3237-48. [PubMed: 19667096]  [MGI Ref ID J:151852]

Kweon MN; Fujihashi K; Wakatsuki Y; Koga T; Yamamoto M; McGhee JR; Kiyono H. 1999. Mucosally induced systemic T cell unresponsiveness to ovalbumin requires CD40 ligand-CD40 interactions. J Immunol 162(4):1904-9. [PubMed: 9973457]  [MGI Ref ID J:112042]

Lapchak PH; Ioannou A; Kannan L; Rani P; Dalle Lucca JJ; Tsokos GC. 2012. Platelet-associated CD40/CD154 mediates remote tissue damage after mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion injury. PLoS One 7(2):e32260. [PubMed: 22384195]  [MGI Ref ID J:185298]

Laporte V; Ait-Ghezala G; Volmar CH; Ganey C; Ganey N; Wood M; Mullan M. 2008. CD40 ligation mediates plaque-associated tau phosphorylation in beta-amyloid overproducing mice. Brain Res 1231:132-42. [PubMed: 18606155]  [MGI Ref ID J:139872]

Lazarevic V; Myers AJ; Scanga CA; Flynn JL. 2003. CD40, but not CD40L, is required for the optimal priming of T cells and control of aerosol M. tuberculosis infection. Immunity 19(6):823-35. [PubMed: 14670300]  [MGI Ref ID J:86998]

Leadbetter EA; Brigl M; Illarionov P; Cohen N; Luteran MC; Pillai S; Besra GS; Brenner MB. 2008. NK T cells provide lipid antigen-specific cognate help for B cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105(24):8339-44. [PubMed: 18550809]  [MGI Ref ID J:137193]

Lee BO; Moyron-Quiroz J; Rangel-Moreno J; Kusser KL; Hartson L; Sprague F; Lund FE; Randall TD. 2003. CD40, but not CD154, expression on B cells is necessary for optimal primary B cell responses. J Immunol 171(11):5707-17. [PubMed: 14634078]  [MGI Ref ID J:119308]

Lefrancois L; Olson S; Masopust D. 1999. A critical role for CD40-CD40 ligand interactions in amplification of the mucosal CD8 T cell response. J Exp Med 190(9):1275-84. [PubMed: 10544199]  [MGI Ref ID J:58316]

Lei XF; Ohkawara Y; Stampfli MR; Mastruzzo C; Marr RA; Snider D; Xing Z; Jordana M. 1998. Disruption of antigen-induced inflammatory responses in CD40 ligand knockout mice. J Clin Invest 101(6):1342-53. [PubMed: 9502776]  [MGI Ref ID J:46546]

Lentz VM; Manser T. 2000. Self-limiting systemic autoimmune disease during reconstitution of T cell-deficient mice with syngeneic T cells: support for a multifaceted role of T cells in the maintenance of peripheral B cell tolerance. Int Immunol 12(11):1483-97. [PubMed: 11058568]  [MGI Ref ID J:110494]

Li JY; Tawfeek H; Bedi B; Yang X; Adams J; Gao KY; Zayzafoon M; Weitzmann MN; Pacifici R. 2011. Ovariectomy disregulates osteoblast and osteoclast formation through the T-cell receptor CD40 ligand. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108(2):768-73. [PubMed: 21187391]  [MGI Ref ID J:169704]

Li R; Page DM. 2001. Requirement for a complex array of costimulators in the negative selection of autoreactive thymocytes in vivo. J Immunol 166(10):6050-6. [PubMed: 11342622]  [MGI Ref ID J:110925]

Li W; Buzoni-Gatel D; Debbabi H; Hu MS; Mennechet FJ; Durell BG; Noelle RJ; Kasper LH. 2002. CD40/CD154 ligation is required for the development of acute ileitis following oral infection with an intracellular pathogen in mice. Gastroenterology 122(3):762-73. [PubMed: 11875009]  [MGI Ref ID J:75019]

Li Y; Toraldo G; Li A; Yang X; Zhang H; Qian WP; Weitzmann MN. 2007. B cells and T cells are critical for the preservation of bone homeostasis and attainment of peak bone mass in vivo. Blood 109(9):3839-48. [PubMed: 17202317]  [MGI Ref ID J:145330]

Lode HN; Xiang R; Pertl U; Forster E; Schoenberger SP; Gillies SD; Reisfeld RA. 2000. Melanoma immunotherapy by targeted IL-2 depends on CD4(+) T-cell help mediated by CD40/CD40L interaction. J Clin Invest 105(11):1623-30. [PubMed: 10841521]  [MGI Ref ID J:62762]

Lund FE; Schuer K; Hollifield M; Randall TD; Garvy BA. 2003. Clearance of Pneumocystis carinii in mice is dependent on B cells but not on P carinii-specific antibody. J Immunol 171(3):1423-30. [PubMed: 12874234]  [MGI Ref ID J:120666]

MacDonald AS; Patton EA; La Flamme AC; Araujo MI; Huxtable CR; Bauman B; Pearce EJ. 2002. Impaired Th2 Development and Increased Mortality During Schistosoma mansoni Infection in the Absence of CD40/CD154 Interaction. J Immunol 168(9):4643-9. [PubMed: 11971013]  [MGI Ref ID J:76160]

Mackey MF; Gunn JR; Maliszewsky C; Kikutani H; Noelle RJ; Barth RJ Jr. 1998. Dendritic cells require maturation via CD40 to generate protective antitumor immunity. J Immunol 161(5):2094-8. [PubMed: 9725199]  [MGI Ref ID J:118387]

Martin-Fontecha A; Assarsson E; Carbone E; Karre K; Ljunggren HG. 1999. Triggering of murine NK cells by CD40 and CD86 (B7-2). J Immunol 162(10):5910-6. [PubMed: 10229827]  [MGI Ref ID J:110890]

McCoy KD; Harris NL; Diener P; Hatak S; Odermatt B; Hangartner L; Senn BM; Marsland BJ; Geuking MB; Hengartner H; Macpherson AJ; Zinkernagel RM. 2006. Natural IgE production in the absence of MHC Class II cognate help. Immunity 24(3):329-39. [PubMed: 16546101]  [MGI Ref ID J:113324]

Moodycliffe AM; Shreedhar V; Ullrich SE; Walterscheid J; Bucana C; Kripke ML; Flores-Romo L. 2000. CD40-CD40 ligand interactions in vivo regulate migration of antigen-bearing dendritic cells from the skin to draining lymph nodes. J Exp Med 191(11):2011-20. [PubMed: 10839815]  [MGI Ref ID J:62702]

Muth S; Schutze K; Hain T; Yagita H; Schild H; Probst HC. 2014. A CD40/CD40L feedback loop drives the breakdown of CD8(+) T-cell tolerance following depletion of suppressive CD4(+) T cells. Eur J Immunol 44(4):1099-107. [PubMed: 24420080]  [MGI Ref ID J:209382]

Nashleanas M; Scott P. 2000. Activated T cells induce macrophages to produce NO and control Leishmania major in the absence of tumor necrosis factor receptor p55. Infect Immun 68(3):1428-34. [PubMed: 10678956]  [MGI Ref ID J:60570]

Nesbeth YC; Martinez DG; Toraya S; Scarlett UK; Cubillos-Ruiz JR; Rutkowski MR; Conejo-Garcia JR. 2010. CD4+ T cells elicit host immune responses to MHC class II- ovarian cancer through CCL5 secretion and CD40-mediated licensing of dendritic cells. J Immunol 184(10):5654-62. [PubMed: 20400704]  [MGI Ref ID J:160992]

Netea MG; Meer JW; Verschueren I; Kullberg BJ. 2002. CD40/CD40 ligand interactions in the host defense against disseminated Candida albicans infection: the role of macrophage-derived nitric oxide. Eur J Immunol 32(5):1455-63. [PubMed: 11981834]  [MGI Ref ID J:115566]

Padigel UM; Perrin PJ; Farrell JP. 2001. The Development of a Th1-Type Response and Resistance to Leishmania major Infection in the Absence of CD40-CD40L Costimulation. J Immunol 167(10):5874-9. [PubMed: 11698463]  [MGI Ref ID J:72682]

Pau E; Chang NH; Loh C; Lajoie G; Wither JE. 2011. Abrogation of pathogenic IgG autoantibody production in CD40L gene-deleted lupus-prone New Zealand Black mice. Clin Immunol 139(2):215-27. [PubMed: 21414847]  [MGI Ref ID J:173967]

Piguet PF; Kan CD; Vesin C; Rochat A; Donati Y; Barazzone C. 2001. Role of CD40-CVD40L in mouse severe malaria. Am J Pathol 159(2):733-42. [PubMed: 11485931]  [MGI Ref ID J:70869]

Pihlgren M; Silva AB; Madani R; Giriens V; Waeckerle-Men Y; Fettelschoss A; Hickman DT; Lopez-Deber MP; Ndao DM; Vukicevic M; Buccarello AL; Gafner V; Chuard N; Reis P; Piorkowska K; Pfeifer A; Kundig TM; Muhs A; Johansen P. 2013. TLR4- and TRIF-dependent stimulation of B lymphocytes by peptide liposomes enables T cell-independent isotype switch in mice. Blood 121(1):85-94. [PubMed: 23144170]  [MGI Ref ID J:192819]

Pochanke V; Hatak S; Hengartner H; Zinkernagel RM; McCoy KD. 2006. Induction of IgE and allergic-type responses in fur mite-infested mice. Eur J Immunol 36(9):2434-45. [PubMed: 16909433]  [MGI Ref ID J:116736]

Poggi M; Engel D; Christ A; Beckers L; Wijnands E; Boon L; Driessen A; Cleutjens J; Weber C; Gerdes N; Lutgens E. 2011. CD40L deficiency ameliorates adipose tissue inflammation and metabolic manifestations of obesity in mice. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 31(10):2251-60. [PubMed: 21817098]  [MGI Ref ID J:191839]

Pollard KM; Arnush M; Hultman P; Kono DH. 2004. Costimulation requirements of induced murine systemic autoimmune disease. J Immunol 173(9):5880-7. [PubMed: 15494542]  [MGI Ref ID J:146416]

Qian L; Qian C; Chen Y; Bai Y; Bao Y; Lu L; Cao X. 2012. Regulatory dendritic cells program B cells to differentiate into CD19hiFcgammaIIbhi regulatory B cells through IFN-beta and CD40L. Blood 120(3):581-91. [PubMed: 22692512]  [MGI Ref ID J:189088]

Reichmann G; Walker W; Villegas EN; Craig L; Cai G; Alexander J; Hunter CA. 2000. The CD40/CD40 ligand interaction is required for resistance to toxoplasmic encephalitis. Infect Immun 68(3):1312-8. [PubMed: 10678943]  [MGI Ref ID J:60577]

Remskar M; Li H; Chyu KY; Shah PK; Cercek B. 2001. Absence of CD40 signaling is associated with an increase in intimal thickening after arterial injury. Circ Res 88(4):390-4. [PubMed: 11230105]  [MGI Ref ID J:115587]

Roy V; Bonventi G; Cai Y; Macleod R; Wither JE. 2007. Immune mechanisms leading to abnormal B cell selection and activation in New Zealand Black mice. Eur J Immunol 37(9):2645-56. [PubMed: 17668901]  [MGI Ref ID J:124351]

Ryu SJ; Jung KM; Yoo HS; Kim TW; Kim S; Chang J; Choi EY. 2009. Cognate CD4 help is essential for the reactivation and expansion of CD8 memory T cells directed against the hematopoietic cell-specific dominant minor histocompatibility antigen, H60. Blood 113(18):4273-80. [PubMed: 19139082]  [MGI Ref ID J:148435]

Scott MJ; Hoth JJ; Stagner MK; Gardner SA; Peyton JC; Cheadle WG. 2004. CD40-CD154 interactions between macrophages and natural killer cells during sepsis are critical for macrophage activation and are not interferon gamma dependent. Clin Exp Immunol 137(3):469-77. [PubMed: 15320895]  [MGI Ref ID J:92312]

Serra P; Amrani A; Yamanouchi J; Han B; Thiessen S; Utsugi T; Verdaguer J; Santamaria P. 2003. CD40 ligation releases immature dendritic cells from the control of regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells. Immunity 19(6):877-89. [PubMed: 14670304]  [MGI Ref ID J:86995]

Sharma MD; Hou DY; Baban B; Koni PA; He Y; Chandler PR; Blazar BR; Mellor AL; Munn DH. 2010. Reprogrammed foxp3(+) regulatory T cells provide essential help to support cross-presentation and CD8(+) T cell priming in naive mice. Immunity 33(6):942-54. [PubMed: 21145762]  [MGI Ref ID J:167291]

Shepherd DM; Kerkvliet NI. 1999. Disruption of CD154:CD40 blocks generation of allograft immunity without affecting APC activation. J Immunol 163(5):2470-7. [PubMed: 10452982]  [MGI Ref ID J:57099]

Shimizu K; Schonbeck U; Mach F; Libby P; Mitchell RN. 2000. Host CD40 ligand deficiency induces long-term allograft survival and donor-specific tolerance in mouse cardiac transplantation but does not prevent graft arteriosclerosis. J Immunol 165(6):3506-18. [PubMed: 10975872]  [MGI Ref ID J:64490]

Smook ML; van Leeuwen M; Heeringa P; Damoiseaux JG; Theunissen R; Daemen MJ; Lutgens E; Cohen Tervaert JW. 2008. Anti-oxLDL antibody isotype levels, as potential markers for progressive atherosclerosis in APOE and APOECD40L mice. Clin Exp Immunol 154(2):264-9. [PubMed: 18778362]  [MGI Ref ID J:142416]

Sokke Umeshappa C; Hebbandi Nanjundappa R; Xie Y; Freywald A; Deng Y; Ma H; Xiang J. 2012. CD154 and IL-2 signaling of CD4+ T cells play a critical role in multiple phases of CD8+ CTL responses following adenovirus vaccination. PLoS One 7(10):e47004. [PubMed: 23071696]  [MGI Ref ID J:192087]

Sprague DL; Elzey BD; Crist SA; Waldschmidt TJ; Jensen RJ; Ratliff TL. 2008. Platelet-mediated modulation of adaptive immunity: unique delivery of CD154 signal by platelet-derived membrane vesicles. Blood 111(10):5028-36. [PubMed: 18198347]  [MGI Ref ID J:135339]

Stokes KY; Calahan L; Hamric CM; Russell JM; Granger DN. 2009. CD40/CD40L contributes to hypercholesterolemia-induced microvascular inflammation. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 296(3):H689-97. [PubMed: 19112095]  [MGI Ref ID J:146361]

Sugaya M; Nakamura K; Asahina A; Fujita H; Tada Y; Torii H; Tamaki K. 2005. Signaling through CD40 ligand decreases CD80 expression on murine Langerhans cells and enhances IL-12 p40 production. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 331(4):1045-52. [PubMed: 15882983]  [MGI Ref ID J:98321]

Sun J; Arias K; Alvarez D; Fattouh R; Walker T; Goncharova S; Kim B; Waserman S; Reed J; Coyle AJ; Jordana M. 2007. Impact of CD40 ligand, B cells, and mast cells in peanut-induced anaphylactic responses. J Immunol 179(10):6696-703. [PubMed: 17982059]  [MGI Ref ID J:154013]

Sun JC; Bevan MJ. 2004. Cutting edge: long-lived CD8 memory and protective immunity in the absence of CD40 expression on CD8 T cells. J Immunol 172(6):3385-9. [PubMed: 15004136]  [MGI Ref ID J:88609]

Tahara M; Pergolizzi RG; Kobayashi H; Krause A; Luettich K; Lesser ML; Crystal RG. 2004. Trans-splicing repair of CD40 ligand deficiency results in naturally regulated correction of a mouse model of hyper-IgM X-linked immunodeficiency. Nat Med 10(8):835-41. [PubMed: 15273748]  [MGI Ref ID J:91607]

Tan JT; Whitmire JK; Ahmed R; Pearson TC; Larsen CP. 1999. 4-1BB ligand, a member of the TNF family, is important for the generation of antiviral CD8 T cell responses. J Immunol 163(9):4859-68. [PubMed: 10528187]  [MGI Ref ID J:118557]

TeKippe M; Harrison DE; Chen J. 2003. Expansion of hematopoietic stem cell phenotype and activity in Trp53-null mice. Exp Hematol 31(6):521-7. [PubMed: 12829028]  [MGI Ref ID J:115677]

Thomsen AR; Nansen A; Christensen JP; Andreasen SO; Marker O. 1998. CD40 ligand is pivotal to efficient control of virus replication in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. J Immunol 161(9):4583-90. [PubMed: 9794385]  [MGI Ref ID J:115236]

Umeshappa CS; Nanjundappa RH; Xie Y; Freywald A; Xu Q; Xiang J. 2013. Differential requirements of CD4(+) T-cell signals for effector cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) priming and functional memory CTL development at higher CD8(+) T-cell precursor frequency. Immunology 138(4):298-306. [PubMed: 23113741]  [MGI Ref ID J:198091]

Van Deusen KE; Rajapakse R; Bullock TN. 2010. CD70 expression by dendritic cells plays a critical role in the immunogenicity of CD40-independent, CD4+ T cell-dependent, licensed CD8+ T cell responses. J Leukoc Biol 87(3):477-85. [PubMed: 19952354]  [MGI Ref ID J:158863]

VanLith ML; Kohlgraf KG; Sivinski CL; Tempero RM; Hollingsworth MA. 2002. MUC1-specific anti-tumor responses: molecular requirements for CD4-mediated responses. Int Immunol 14(8):873-82. [PubMed: 12147624]  [MGI Ref ID J:113544]

Verkoczy L; Chen Y; Zhang J; Bouton-Verville H; Newman A; Lockwood B; Scearce RM; Montefiori DC; Dennison SM; Xia SM; Hwang KK; Liao HX; Alam SM; Haynes BF. 2013. Induction of HIV-1 broad neutralizing antibodies in 2F5 knock-in mice: selection against membrane proximal external region-associated autoreactivity limits T-dependent responses. J Immunol 191(5):2538-50. [PubMed: 23918977]  [MGI Ref ID J:205800]

Villegas EN; Elloso MM; Reichmann G; Peach R; Hunter CA. 1999. Role of CD28 in the generation of effector and memory responses required for resistance to Toxoplasma gondii. J Immunol 163(6):3344-53. [PubMed: 10477604]  [MGI Ref ID J:119602]

Vishwakarma V; Pati NB; Chandel HS; Sahoo SS; Saha B; Suar M. 2012. Evaluation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium TTSS-2 deficient fur mutant as safe live-attenuated vaccine candidate for immunocompromised mice. PLoS One 7(12):e52043. [PubMed: 23284865]  [MGI Ref ID J:195626]

Vowinkel T; Anthoni C; Wood KC; Stokes KY; Russell J; Gray L; Bharwani S; Senninger N; Alexander JS; Krieglstein CF; Grisham MB; Granger DN. 2007. CD40-CD40 ligand mediates the recruitment of leukocytes and platelets in the inflamed murine colon. Gastroenterology 132(3):955-65. [PubMed: 17324402]  [MGI Ref ID J:128219]

Vowinkel T; Wood KC; Stokes KY; Russell J; Krieglstein CF; Granger DN. 2006. Differential expression and regulation of murine CD40 in regional vascular beds. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 290(2):H631-9. [PubMed: 16172156]  [MGI Ref ID J:106724]

Vu F; Dianzani U; Ware CF; Mak T; Gommerman JL. 2008. ICOS, CD40, and lymphotoxin beta receptors signal sequentially and interdependently to initiate a germinal center reaction. J Immunol 180(4):2284-93. [PubMed: 18250437]  [MGI Ref ID J:131998]

Whitmire JK; Flavell RA; Grewal IS; Larsen CP; Pearson TC; Ahmed R. 1999. CD40-CD40 ligand costimulation is required for generating antiviral CD4 T cell responses but is dispensable for CD8 T cell responses. J Immunol 163(6):3194-201. [PubMed: 10477587]  [MGI Ref ID J:110838]

Williams JA; Sharrow SO; Adams AJ; Hodes RJ. 2002. CD40 ligand functions non-cell autonomously to promote deletion of self-reactive thymocytes. J Immunol 168(6):2759-65. [PubMed: 11884443]  [MGI Ref ID J:126679]

Williams JA; Zhang J; Jeon H; Nitta T; Ohigashi I; Klug D; Kruhlak MJ; Choudhury B; Sharrow SO; Granger L; Adams A; Eckhaus MA; Jenkinson SR; Richie ER; Gress RE; Takahama Y; Hodes RJ. 2014. Thymic medullary epithelium and thymocyte self-tolerance require cooperation between CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L costimulatory pathways. J Immunol 192(2):630-40. [PubMed: 24337745]  [MGI Ref ID J:207324]

Wolf D; Hohmann JD; Wiedemann A; Bledzka K; Blankenbach H; Marchini T; Gutte K; Zeschky K; Bassler N; Hoppe N; Rodriguez AO; Herr N; Hilgendorf I; Stachon P; Willecke F; Duerschmied D; von zur Muhlen C; Soloviev DA; Zhang L; Bode C; Plow EF; Libby P; Peter K; Zirlik A. 2011. Binding of CD40L to Mac-1's I-domain involves the EQLKKSKTL motif and mediates leukocyte recruitment and atherosclerosis--but does not affect immunity and thrombosis in mice. Circ Res 109(11):1269-79. [PubMed: 21998326]  [MGI Ref ID J:196556]

Wolf D; Jehle F; Ortiz Rodriguez A; Dufner B; Hoppe N; Colberg C; Lozhkin A; Bassler N; Rupprecht B; Wiedemann A; Hilgendorf I; Stachon P; Willecke F; Febbraio M; von zur Muhlen C; Binder CJ; Bode C; Zirlik A; Peter K. 2012. CD40L deficiency attenuates diet-induced adipose tissue inflammation by impairing immune cell accumulation and production of pathogenic IgG-antibodies. PLoS One 7(3):e33026. [PubMed: 22412980]  [MGI Ref ID J:186930]

Wu ZQ; Vos Q; Shen Y; Lees A; Wilson SR; Briles DE; Gause WC; Mond JJ; Snapper CM. 1999. In vivo polysaccharide-specific IgG isotype responses to intact Streptococcus pneumoniae are T cell dependent and require CD40- and B7-ligand interactions. J Immunol 163(2):659-67. [PubMed: 10395655]  [MGI Ref ID J:119892]

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Zaretsky AG; Taylor JJ; King IL; Marshall FA; Mohrs M; Pearce EJ. 2009. T follicular helper cells differentiate from Th2 cells in response to helminth antigens. J Exp Med 206(5):991-9. [PubMed: 19380637]  [MGI Ref ID J:148501]

Zhou P; Seder RA. 1998. CD40 ligand is not essential for induction of type 1 cytokine responses or protective immunity after primary or secondary infection with histoplasma capsulatum. J Exp Med 187(8):1315-24. [PubMed: 9547342]  [MGI Ref ID J:118790]

Health & husbandry

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryWhen maintaining a live colony, these mice can be bred as homozygous females and hemizygous males. The targeted mutation is X-linked. These mice are somewhat immunocompromised, specific pathogen-free (SPF) conditions are recommended.

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $2525.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3283.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Control Information

  Control
   001026 BALB/cByJ
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
Surgical and Preconditioning Services
JAX® Services
Customer Services and Support
Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
Technical Support Email Form

Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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