Strain Name:

STOCK Fgfr2tm1Dor/J

Stock Number:

007569

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Availability:

Cryopreserved - Ready for recovery

Use Restrictions Apply, see Terms of Use
These Fgfr2-flox mutant mice may be useful in generating conditional mutations to study the role of fibroblast growth factor receptors in vertebrate development; including early embryogenesis, regional specification of the brain, limb morphogenesis, and normal bone, craniofacial, and lens development.

Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Former Names B6.129X1(Cg)-Fgfr2tm1Dor/J    (Changed: 08-JUL-09 )
STOCK Fgfr2tm1Dor/J    (Changed: 25-NOV-08 )
B6;129X1-Fgfr2tm1Dor/J    (Changed: 25-FEB-08 )
Type Mutant Stock; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
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Specieslaboratory mouse
 
Donating Investigator David Ornitz,   Washington University School of Medicine

Description
Mice homozygous for this Fgfr2flox allele possess loxP sites flanking exons 8-10 of the targeted gene and are viable and fertile. When these mutant mice are bred to mice that express Cre recombinase, resulting offspring will have sequences encoding the alternatively spliced Ig domain IIIb, as well as the IIIc and TM domains, deleted in the cre-expressing tissue(s). These Fgfr2-flox mutant mice may be useful in generating conditional mutations to study the role of fibroblast growth factor receptors in vertebrate development; including early embryogenesis, regional specification of the brain, limb morphogenesis, and normal bone, craniofacial, and lens development.

For example, when crossed to a strain expressing Cre recombinase in the central nervous system, especially astrocytes (see Stock No. 004600), this mutant mouse strain may be useful in studies of astroglial migration.

When crossed to a strain expressing Cre recombinase in the neural tube, midbrain and dorsal spinal cord (see Stock No. 009107), this mutant mouse strain may be useful in studies of lacrimal gland development.

Development
A targeting vector was designed to insert a loxp site in intron 7 and an FRT-neo cassette and loxP site in intron 10 of the targeted gene. The construct was electroporated into 129X1/SvJ-derived RW4 embryonic stem (ES) cells. Correctly targeted ES cells were injected into blastocysts and the resulting chimeric mice were bred to C57BL/6. Mice harboring this "Fgfr2-flox" mutant allele were bred to other mutant mice (C57 and 129 genetic backgrounds). Mice were then bred to C57BL/6J for 4-7 generations (to remove the unwanted mutations and then make the strain congenic). Mice harboring only the Fgfr2-flox mutant allele were sent to The Jackson Laboratory. Upon arrival, mice were bred to C57BL/6J for at least 1 generation to establish the colony.

NOTE: A 27 SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) panel analysis performed by The Jackson Laboratory revealed that this strain is on a mixed background (5 out of 27 markers are segregating for 129 genetic background).

Control Information

  Control
   101043 B6129SF1/J (approximate)
   101045 B6129SF2/J (approximate)
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying   Fgfr2tm1Dor allele
007579   B6.129X1(Cg)-Fgfr2tm1Dor/J
View Strains carrying   Fgfr2tm1Dor     (1 strain)

Strains carrying other alleles of Fgfr2
000355   CXB5/ByJ
025672   FVB/N-Tg(tetO-Fgfr2b/Igh)1.3Jaw/J
View Strains carrying other alleles of Fgfr2     (2 strains)

Additional Web Information

Introduction to Cre-lox technology

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

The following phenotype relates to a compound genotype created using this strain.
Contact JAX® Services jaxservices@jax.org for customized breeding options.

Fgfr2tm1Dor/Fgfr2tm1Dor Tg(GFAP-cre)25Mes/0

        involves: 129X1/SvJ * FVB/N   (conditional)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal astrocyte morphology
    • numbers of astrocytes reaching the cortex is significantly reduced compared to controls at P7; greatest loss (60%) is in the upper cortical layers with 22% loss in the subcortical white matter   (MGI Ref ID J:110263)
    • there is an intermediate reduction (39%) in astrocte density was seen in the inferior cortical layers   (MGI Ref ID J:110263)
  • abnormal brain morphology
    • mice show a subtle reduction in cortical size compared to control mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110263)

Fgfr2tm1Dor/Fgfr2tm1Dor Tg(Wnt1-cre)11Rth/0

        involves: 129X1/SvJ * C57BL/6J * CBA/J   (conditional)
  • vision/eye phenotype
  • *normal* vision/eye phenotype
    • lacrimal gland development is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:130571)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Developmental Biology Research

Research Tools
Cre-lox System
      loxP-flanked Sequences
Developmental Biology Research
      Cre-lox System

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Fgfr2tm1Dor
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, David M Ornitz
Allele Type Targeted (Conditional ready (e.g. floxed), No functional change)
Common Name(s) Fgfr2Lox; Fgfr2f; Fgfr2fl; Fgfr2flox; Fgfr2loxP;
Mutation Made By David Ornitz,   Washington University School of Medicine
Strain of Origin129X1/SvJ
ES Cell Line NameRW-4
ES Cell Line Strain129X1/SvJ
Gene Symbol and Name Fgfr2, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2
Chromosome 7
Gene Common Name(s) AU043015; AW556123; BBDS; BEK; BFR-1; Bek; CD332; CEK3; CFD1; ECT1; Fgfr-2; Fgfr-7; Fgfr7; JWS; K-SAM; KGFR; KGFRTr; TK14; TK25; bacterially expressed kinase; expressed sequence AU043015; expressed sequence AW556123; fibroblast growth factor receptor 7; seminal vesicle shape; svs;
Molecular Note Exons 7 through 10 were flanked by a single loxP site in intron 6 and an FRT-flanked neo cassette with a 3' loxP site in intron 10. [MGI Ref ID J:90391]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Fgfr2tm1Dor, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Yu K; Xu J; Liu Z; Sosic D; Shao J; Olson EN; Towler DA; Ornitz DM. 2003. Conditional inactivation of FGF receptor 2 reveals an essential role for FGF signaling in the regulation of osteoblast function and bone growth. Development 130(13):3063-74. [PubMed: 12756187]  [MGI Ref ID J:90391]

Additional References

Fgfr2tm1Dor related

Abler LL; Mansour SL; Sun X. 2009. Conditional gene inactivation reveals roles for Fgf10 and Fgfr2 in establishing a normal pattern of epithelial branching in the mouse lung. Dev Dyn 238(8):1999-2013. [PubMed: 19618463]  [MGI Ref ID J:150706]

Bagheri-Fam S; Sim H; Bernard P; Jayakody I; Taketo MM; Scherer G; Harley VR. 2008. Loss of Fgfr2 leads to partial XY sex reversal. Dev Biol 314(1):71-83. [PubMed: 18155190]  [MGI Ref ID J:130928]

Blak AA; Naserke T; Saarimaki-Vire J; Peltopuro P; Giraldo-Velasquez M; Vogt Weisenhorn DM; Prakash N; Sendtner M; Partanen J; Wurst W. 2007. Fgfr2 and Fgfr3 are not required for patterning and maintenance of the midbrain and anterior hindbrain. Dev Biol 303(1):231-43. [PubMed: 17150206]  [MGI Ref ID J:118802]

Cai Z; Tao C; Li H; Ladher R; Gotoh N; Feng GS; Wang F; Zhang X. 2013. Deficient FGF signaling causes optic nerve dysgenesis and ocular coloboma. Development 140(13):2711-23. [PubMed: 23720040]  [MGI Ref ID J:198655]

Carpenter A; Paulus A; Robinson M; Bates CM; Robinson ML; Hains D; Kline D; McHugh KM. 2012. 3-dimensional morphometric analysis of murine bladder development and dysmorphogenesis. Dev Dyn 241(3):522-33. [PubMed: 22275180]  [MGI Ref ID J:181270]

Chang DR; Martinez Alanis D; Miller RK; Ji H; Akiyama H; McCrea PD; Chen J. 2013. Lung epithelial branching program antagonizes alveolar differentiation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110(45):18042-51. [PubMed: 24058167]  [MGI Ref ID J:202949]

Chen Z; Huang J; Liu Y; Dattilo LK; Huh SH; Ornitz D; Beebe DC. 2014. FGF signaling activates a Sox9-Sox10 pathway for the formation and branching morphogenesis of mouse ocular glands. Development 141(13):2691-701. [PubMed: 24924191]  [MGI Ref ID J:213873]

Domyan ET; Ferretti E; Throckmorton K; Mishina Y; Nicolis SK; Sun X. 2011. Signaling through BMP receptors promotes respiratory identity in the foregut via repression of Sox2. Development 138(5):971-81. [PubMed: 21303850]  [MGI Ref ID J:169134]

Filant J; DeMayo FJ; Pru JK; Lydon JP; Spencer TE. 2014. Fibroblast growth factor receptor two (FGFR2) regulates uterine epithelial integrity and fertility in mice. Biol Reprod 90(1):7. [PubMed: 24227756]  [MGI Ref ID J:210359]

Fox MA; Sanes JR; Borza DB; Eswarakumar VP; Fassler R; Hudson BG; John SW; Ninomiya Y; Pedchenko V; Pfaff SL; Rheault MN; Sado Y; Segal Y; Werle MJ; Umemori H. 2007. Distinct target-derived signals organize formation, maturation, and maintenance of motor nerve terminals. Cell 129(1):179-93. [PubMed: 17418794]  [MGI Ref ID J:126496]

Furusho M; Dupree JL; Bryant M; Bansal R. 2009. Disruption of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in nonmyelinating Schwann cells causes sensory axonal neuropathy and impairment of thermal pain sensitivity. J Neurosci 29(6):1608-14. [PubMed: 19211868]  [MGI Ref ID J:146432]

Furusho M; Dupree JL; Nave KA; Bansal R. 2012. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in oligodendrocytes regulates myelin sheath thickness. J Neurosci 32(19):6631-41. [PubMed: 22573685]  [MGI Ref ID J:184849]

Furusho M; Kaga Y; Ishii A; Hebert JM; Bansal R. 2011. Fibroblast growth factor signaling is required for the generation of oligodendrocyte progenitors from the embryonic forebrain. J Neurosci 31(13):5055-66. [PubMed: 21451043]  [MGI Ref ID J:171201]

Garcia CM; Huang J; Madakashira BP; Liu Y; Rajagopal R; Dattilo L; Robinson ML; Beebe DC. 2011. The function of FGF signaling in the lens placode. Dev Biol 351(1):176-85. [PubMed: 21223962]  [MGI Ref ID J:170649]

Garcia CM; Yu K; Zhao H; Ashery-Padan R; Ornitz DM; Robinson ML; Beebe DC. 2005. Signaling through FGF receptor-2 is required for lens cell survival and for withdrawal from the cell cycle during lens fiber cell differentiation. Dev Dyn 233(2):516-27. [PubMed: 15778993]  [MGI Ref ID J:104596]

Geske MJ; Zhang X; Patel KK; Ornitz DM; Stappenbeck TS. 2008. Fgf9 signaling regulates small intestinal elongation and mesenchymal development. Development 135(17):2959-68. [PubMed: 18653563]  [MGI Ref ID J:139005]

Green MJ; Myat AM; Emmenegger BA; Wechsler-Reya RJ; Wilson LJ; Wingate RJ. 2014. Independently specified Atoh1 domains define novel developmental compartments in rhombomere 1. Development 141(2):389-98. [PubMed: 24381197]  [MGI Ref ID J:206577]

Guntur AR; Reinhold MI; Cuellar J Jr; Naski MC. 2011. Conditional ablation of Pten in osteoprogenitors stimulates FGF signaling. Development 138(7):1433-44. [PubMed: 21385768]  [MGI Ref ID J:171503]

Gutin G; Fernandes M; Palazzolo L; Paek H; Yu K; Ornitz DM; McConnell SK; Hebert JM. 2006. FGF signalling generates ventral telencephalic cells independently of SHH. Development 133(15):2937-46. [PubMed: 16818446]  [MGI Ref ID J:119019]

Hains D; Sims-Lucas S; Kish K; Saha M; McHugh K; Bates CM. 2008. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 in kidney mesenchyme. Pediatr Res 64(6):592-8. [PubMed: 18670373]  [MGI Ref ID J:142864]

Hains DS; Sims-Lucas S; Carpenter A; Saha M; Murawski I; Kish K; Gupta I; McHugh K; Bates CM. 2010. High incidence of vesicoureteral reflux in mice with Fgfr2 deletion in kidney mesenchyma. J Urol 183(5):2077-84. [PubMed: 20303521]  [MGI Ref ID J:161976]

Hertzler-Schaefer K; Mathew G; Somani AK; Tholpady S; Kadakia MP; Chen Y; Spandau DF; Zhang X. 2014. Pten loss induces autocrine FGF signaling to promote skin tumorigenesis. Cell Rep 6(5):818-26. [PubMed: 24582960]  [MGI Ref ID J:211713]

Hosokawa R; Deng X; Takamori K; Xu X; Urata M; Bringas P Jr; Chai Y. 2009. Epithelial-specific requirement of FGFR2 signaling during tooth and palate development. J Exp Zool B Mol Dev Evol 312B(4):343-50. [PubMed: 19235875]  [MGI Ref ID J:156255]

Huang J; Dattilo LK; Rajagopal R; Liu Y; Kaartinen V; Mishina Y; Deng CX; Umans L; Zwijsen A; Roberts AB; Beebe DC. 2009. FGF-regulated BMP signaling is required for eyelid closure and to specify conjunctival epithelial cell fate. Development 136(10):1741-50. [PubMed: 19369394]  [MGI Ref ID J:148019]

Hung IH; Yu K; Lavine KJ; Ornitz DM. 2007. FGF9 regulates early hypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation and skeletal vascularization in the developing stylopod. Dev Biol 307(2):300-13. [PubMed: 17544391]  [MGI Ref ID J:122952]

Jameson SA; Lin YT; Capel B. 2012. Testis development requires the repression of Wnt4 by Fgf signaling. Dev Biol 370(1):24-32. [PubMed: 22705479]  [MGI Ref ID J:188056]

Jin C; McKeehan K; Wang F. 2003. Transgenic mouse with high Cre recombinase activity in all prostate lobes, seminal vesicle, and ductus deferens. Prostate 57(2):160-4. [PubMed: 12949940]  [MGI Ref ID J:123132]

Kaga Y; Shoemaker WJ; Furusho M; Bryant M; Rosenbluth J; Pfeiffer SE; Oh L; Rasband M; Lappe-Siefke C; Yu K; Ornitz DM; Nave KA; Bansal R. 2006. Mice with conditional inactivation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 signaling in oligodendrocytes have normal myelin but display dramatic hyperactivity when combined with Cnp1 inactivation. J Neurosci 26(47):12339-50. [PubMed: 17122059]  [MGI Ref ID J:116178]

Kim Y; Bingham N; Sekido R; Parker KL; Lovell-Badge R; Capel B. 2007. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 regulates proliferation and Sertoli differentiation during male sex determination. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104(42):16558-63. [PubMed: 17940049]  [MGI Ref ID J:125927]

Kitagaki J; Ueda Y; Chi X; Sharma N; Elder CM; Truffer E; Costantini F; Lewandoski M; Perantoni AO. 2011. FGF8 is essential for formation of the ductal system in the male reproductive tract. Development 138(24):5369-78. [PubMed: 22110055]  [MGI Ref ID J:178935]

Konishi M; Nakamura H; Miwa H; Chambon P; Ornitz DM; Itoh N. 2008. Role of Fgf receptor 2c in adipocyte hypertrophy in mesenteric white adipose tissue. Mol Cell Endocrinol 287(1-2):13-9. [PubMed: 18396371]  [MGI Ref ID J:145510]

Kuslak SL; Thielen JL; Marker PC. 2007. The mouse seminal vesicle shape mutation is allelic with Fgfr2. Development 134(3):557-65. [PubMed: 17202188]  [MGI Ref ID J:119935]

Kyono A; Avishai N; Ouyang Z; Landreth GE; Murakami S. 2012. FGF and ERK signaling coordinately regulate mineralization-related genes and play essential roles in osteocyte differentiation. J Bone Miner Metab 30(1):19-30. [PubMed: 21678127]  [MGI Ref ID J:197592]

Lahti L; Peltopuro P; Piepponen TP; Partanen J. 2012. Cell-autonomous FGF signaling regulates anteroposterior patterning and neuronal differentiation in the mesodiencephalic dopaminergic progenitor domain. Development 139(5):894-905. [PubMed: 22278924]  [MGI Ref ID J:182759]

Lahti L; Saarimaki-Vire J; Rita H; Partanen J. 2011. FGF signaling gradient maintains symmetrical proliferative divisions of midbrain neuronal progenitors. Dev Biol 349(2):270-82. [PubMed: 21074523]  [MGI Ref ID J:168023]

Lania G; Zhang Z; Huynh T; Caprio C; Moon AM; Vitelli F; Baldini A. 2009. Early thyroid development requires a Tbx1-Fgf8 pathway. Dev Biol 328(1):109-17. [PubMed: 19389367]  [MGI Ref ID J:149463]

Lavine KJ; Schmid GJ; Smith CS; Ornitz DM. 2008. Novel tool to suppress cell proliferation in vivo demonstrates that myocardial and coronary vascular growth represent distinct developmental programs. Dev Dyn 237(3):713-24. [PubMed: 18297725]  [MGI Ref ID J:131577]

Lavine KJ; White AC; Park C; Smith CS; Choi K; Long F; Hui CC; Ornitz DM. 2006. Fibroblast growth factor signals regulate a wave of Hedgehog activation that is essential for coronary vascular development. Genes Dev 20(12):1651-66. [PubMed: 16778080]  [MGI Ref ID J:109722]

Lavine KJ; Yu K; White AC; Zhang X; Smith C; Partanen J; Ornitz DM. 2005. Endocardial and epicardial derived FGF signals regulate myocardial proliferation and differentiation in vivo. Dev Cell 8(1):85-95. [PubMed: 15621532]  [MGI Ref ID J:95803]

Lei Z; Lin J; Li X; Li S; Zhou H; Araki Y; Lan ZJ. 2010. Postnatal male germ-cell expression of cre recombinase in Tex101-iCre transgenic mice. Genesis 48(12):717-22. [PubMed: 20853429]  [MGI Ref ID J:168353]

Lin Y; Chen L; Lin C; Luo Y; Tsai RY; Wang F. 2009. Neuron-derived FGF9 is essential for scaffold formation of Bergmann radial fibers and migration of granule neurons in the cerebellum. Dev Biol 329(1):44-54. [PubMed: 19232523]  [MGI Ref ID J:148042]

Lin Y; Cheng YS; Qin C; Lin C; D'Souza R; Wang F. 2009. FGFR2 in the dental epithelium is essential for development and maintenance of the maxillary cervical loop, a stem cell niche in mouse incisors. Dev Dyn 238(2):324-30. [PubMed: 18985768]  [MGI Ref ID J:145026]

Lin Y; Liu G; Zhang Y; Hu YP; Yu K; Lin C; McKeehan K; Xuan JW; Ornitz DM; Shen MM; Greenberg N; McKeehan WL; Wang F. 2007. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 tyrosine kinase is required for prostatic morphogenesis and the acquisition of strict androgen dependency for adult tissue homeostasis. Development 134(4):723-34. [PubMed: 17215304]  [MGI Ref ID J:119911]

Lu BC; Cebrian C; Chi X; Kuure S; Kuo R; Bates CM; Arber S; Hassell J; MacNeil L; Hoshi M; Jain S; Asai N; Takahashi M; Schmidt-Ott KM; Barasch J; D'Agati V; Costantini F. 2009. Etv4 and Etv5 are required downstream of GDNF and Ret for kidney branching morphogenesis. Nat Genet 41(12):1295-302. [PubMed: 19898483]  [MGI Ref ID J:155594]

Lu P; Ewald AJ; Martin GR; Werb Z. 2008. Genetic mosaic analysis reveals FGF receptor 2 function in terminal end buds during mammary gland branching morphogenesis. Dev Biol 321(1):77-87. [PubMed: 18585375]  [MGI Ref ID J:138612]

Lu P; Yu Y; Perdue Y; Werb Z. 2008. The apical ectodermal ridge is a timer for generating distal limb progenitors. Development 135(8):1395-405. [PubMed: 18359901]  [MGI Ref ID J:136057]

Madakashira BP; Kobrinski DA; Hancher AD; Arneman EC; Wagner BD; Wang F; Shin H; Lovicu FJ; Reneker LW; Robinson ML. 2012. Frs2alpha enhances fibroblast growth factor-mediated survival and differentiation in lens development. Development 139(24):4601-12. [PubMed: 23136392]  [MGI Ref ID J:189960]

Maier E; von Hofsten J; Nord H; Fernandes M; Paek H; Hebert JM; Gunhaga L. 2010. Opposing Fgf and Bmp activities regulate the specification of olfactory sensory and respiratory epithelial cell fates. Development 137(10):1601-11. [PubMed: 20392740]  [MGI Ref ID J:160372]

Meyer M; Muller AK; Yang J; Moik D; Ponzio G; Ornitz DM; Grose R; Werner S. 2012. FGF receptors 1 and 2 are key regulators of keratinocyte migration in vitro and in wounded skin. J Cell Sci 125(Pt 23):5690-701. [PubMed: 22992463]  [MGI Ref ID J:200269]

Mukhopadhyay A; Krishnaswami SR; Cowing-Zitron C; Hung NJ; Reilly-Rhoten H; Burns J; Yu BD. 2013. Negative regulation of Shh levels by Kras and Fgfr2 during hair follicle development. Dev Biol 373(2):373-82. [PubMed: 23123965]  [MGI Ref ID J:192269]

Muller Smith K; Williamson TL; Schwartz ML; Vaccarino FM. 2012. Impaired motor coordination and disrupted cerebellar architecture in Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 double knockout mice. Brain Res 1460:12-24. [PubMed: 22578469]  [MGI Ref ID J:186443]

Nichol PF; Corliss RF; Tyrrell JD; Graham B; Reeder A; Saijoh Y. 2011. Conditional mutation of fibroblast growth factor receptors 1 and 2 results in an omphalocele in mice associated with disruptions in ventral body wall muscle formation. J Pediatr Surg 46(1):90-6. [PubMed: 21238647]  [MGI Ref ID J:170635]

Paek H; Gutin G; Hebert JM. 2009. FGF signaling is strictly required to maintain early telencephalic precursor cell survival. Development 136(14):2457-65. [PubMed: 19542358]  [MGI Ref ID J:150347]

Pan Y; Carbe C; Powers A; Zhang EE; Esko JD; Grobe K; Feng GS; Zhang X. 2008. Bud specific N-sulfation of heparan sulfate regulates Shp2-dependent FGF signaling during lacrimal gland induction. Development 135(2):301-10. [PubMed: 18077586]  [MGI Ref ID J:130571]

Park EJ; Watanabe Y; Smyth G; Miyagawa-Tomita S; Meyers E; Klingensmith J; Camenisch T; Buckingham M; Moon AM. 2008. An FGF autocrine loop initiated in second heart field mesoderm regulates morphogenesis at the arterial pole of the heart. Development 135(21):3599-610. [PubMed: 18832392]  [MGI Ref ID J:143444]

Poladia DP; Kish K; Kutay B; Hains D; Kegg H; Zhao H; Bates CM. 2006. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptors 1 and 2 in the metanephric mesenchyme. Dev Biol 291(2):325-39. [PubMed: 16442091]  [MGI Ref ID J:107078]

Pond AC; Bin X; Batts T; Roarty K; Hilsenbeck S; Rosen JM. 2013. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling is essential for normal mammary gland development and stem cell function. Stem Cells 31(1):178-89. [PubMed: 23097355]  [MGI Ref ID J:194704]

Rash BG; Lim HD; Breunig JJ; Vaccarino FM. 2011. FGF Signaling Expands Embryonic Cortical Surface Area by Regulating Notch-Dependent Neurogenesis. J Neurosci 31(43):15604-17. [PubMed: 22031906]  [MGI Ref ID J:177263]

Sims-Lucas S; Argyropoulos C; Kish K; McHugh K; Bertram JF; Quigley R; Bates CM. 2009. Three-dimensional imaging reveals ureteric and mesenchymal defects in Fgfr2-mutant kidneys. J Am Soc Nephrol 20(12):2525-33. [PubMed: 19833900]  [MGI Ref ID J:166882]

Sims-Lucas S; Cusack B; Eswarakumar VP; Zhang J; Wang F; Bates CM. 2011. Independent roles of Fgfr2 and Frs2alpha in ureteric epithelium. Development 138(7):1275-80. [PubMed: 21350013]  [MGI Ref ID J:171514]

Smith KM; Ohkubo Y; Maragnoli ME; Rasin MR; Schwartz ML; Sestan N; Vaccarino FM. 2006. Midline radial glia translocation and corpus callosum formation require FGF signaling. Nat Neurosci 9(6):787-97. [PubMed: 16715082]  [MGI Ref ID J:110263]

Stevens HE; Smith KM; Maragnoli ME; Fagel D; Borok E; Shanabrough M; Horvath TL; Vaccarino FM. 2010. Fgfr2 is required for the development of the medial prefrontal cortex and its connections with limbic circuits. J Neurosci 30(16):5590-602. [PubMed: 20410112]  [MGI Ref ID J:159839]

Terauchi A; Johnson-Venkatesh EM; Toth AB; Javed D; Sutton MA; Umemori H. 2010. Distinct FGFs promote differentiation of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Nature 465(7299):783-7. [PubMed: 20505669]  [MGI Ref ID J:161954]

Umemori H; Linhoff MW; Ornitz DM; Sanes JR. 2004. FGF22 and its close relatives are presynaptic organizing molecules in the mammalian brain. Cell 118(2):257-70. [PubMed: 15260994]  [MGI Ref ID J:91948]

Vega-Hernandez M; Kovacs A; De Langhe S; Ornitz DM. 2011. FGF10/FGFR2b signaling is essential for cardiac fibroblast development and growth of the myocardium. Development 138(15):3331-40. [PubMed: 21750042]  [MGI Ref ID J:175538]

Walker KA; Sims-Lucas S; Di Giovanni VE; Schaefer C; Sunseri WM; Novitskaya T; de Caestecker MP; Chen F; Bates CM. 2013. Deletion of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 from the peri-wolffian duct stroma leads to ureteric induction abnormalities and vesicoureteral reflux. PLoS One 8(2):e56062. [PubMed: 23409123]  [MGI Ref ID J:199419]

White AC; Lavine KJ; Ornitz DM. 2007. FGF9 and SHH regulate mesenchymal Vegfa expression and development of the pulmonary capillary network. Development 134(20):3743-52. [PubMed: 17881491]  [MGI Ref ID J:128368]

White AC; Xu J; Yin Y; Smith C; Schmid G; Ornitz DM. 2006. FGF9 and SHH signaling coordinate lung growth and development through regulation of distinct mesenchymal domains. Development 133(8):1507-17. [PubMed: 16540513]  [MGI Ref ID J:107406]

Yang J; Meyer M; Muller AK; Bohm F; Grose R; Dauwalder T; Verrey F; Kopf M; Partanen J; Bloch W; Ornitz DM; Werner S. 2010. Fibroblast growth factor receptors 1 and 2 in keratinocytes control the epidermal barrier and cutaneous homeostasis. J Cell Biol 188(6):935-52. [PubMed: 20308431]  [MGI Ref ID J:158802]

Yin Y; White AC; Huh SH; Hilton MJ; Kanazawa H; Long F; Ornitz DM. 2008. An FGF-WNT gene regulatory network controls lung mesenchyme development. Dev Biol 319(2):426-36. [PubMed: 18533146]  [MGI Ref ID J:137691]

Yu K; Ornitz DM. 2008. FGF signaling regulates mesenchymal differentiation and skeletal patterning along the limb bud proximodistal axis. Development 135(3):483-91. [PubMed: 18094024]  [MGI Ref ID J:130854]

Zhang J; Chang JY; Huang Y; Lin X; Luo Y; Schwartz RJ; Martin JF; Wang F. 2010. The FGF-BMP signaling axis regulates outflow tract valve primordium formation by promoting cushion neural crest cell differentiation. Circ Res 107(10):1209-19. [PubMed: 20847311]  [MGI Ref ID J:178188]

Zhang J; Lin Y; Zhang Y; Lan Y; Lin C; Moon AM; Schwartz RJ; Martin JF; Wang F. 2008. Frs2alpha-deficiency in cardiac progenitors disrupts a subset of FGF signals required for outflow tract morphogenesis. Development 135(21):3611-22. [PubMed: 18832393]  [MGI Ref ID J:143443]

Zhang J; Liu J; Huang Y; Chang JY; Liu L; McKeehan WL; Martin JF; Wang F. 2012. FRS2alpha-mediated FGF signals suppress premature differentiation of cardiac stem cells through regulating autophagy activity. Circ Res 110(4):e29-39. [PubMed: 22207710]  [MGI Ref ID J:192700]

Zhao H; Kegg H; Grady S; Truong HT; Robinson ML; Baum M; Bates CM. 2004. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptors 1 and 2 in the ureteric bud. Dev Biol 276(2):403-15. [PubMed: 15581874]  [MGI Ref ID J:95018]

Zhao H; Yang T; Madakashira BP; Thiels CA; Bechtle CA; Garcia CM; Zhang H; Yu K; Ornitz DM; Beebe DC; Robinson ML. 2008. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling is essential for lens fiber cell differentiation. Dev Biol 318(2):276-88. [PubMed: 18455718]  [MGI Ref ID J:136711]

Health & husbandry

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryWhen maintaining a live colony, homozygous mice may be bred together.

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $2140.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $2782.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Control Information

  Control
   101043 B6129SF1/J (approximate)
   101045 B6129SF2/J (approximate)
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
Surgical and Preconditioning Services
JAX® Services
Customer Services and Support
Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
Technical Support Email Form

Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


For Licensing and Use Restrictions view the link(s) below:
- Use of MICE by companies or for-profit entities requires a license prior to shipping.
- Use of MICE by companies or for-profit entities requires a license.

Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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