Strain Name:

129S-Hcrttm1Ywa/J

Stock Number:

008866

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Mice lacking orexin/hypocretin (Hcrt) gene expression exhibit phenotypes remarkably similar to humans with narcolepsy. These are characterized by behavioral arrests that are similar to cataplexy (occasional direct transitions to REM sleep from wakefulness), and highly fragmented sleep-wake cycles, all of which are important elements of narcolepsy. Homozygotes are viable and fertile.

Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Type Mutant Stock; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
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Specieslaboratory mouse
 
Donating InvestigatorDr. Masashi Yanagisawa,   Southwestern Medical School

Description
Mice lacking orexin/hypocretin gene expression exhibit phenotypes remarkably similar to humans with narcolepsy. These are characterized by behavioral arrests that are similar to cataplexy (occasional direct transitions to REM sleep from wakefulness), and highly fragmented sleep-wake cycles, all of which are important elements of narcolepsy. Homozygotes are viable and fertile.

Development
Exon 1 of the orexin gene was replaced with a nuclear lacZ/neomycin resistance cassette. The targeted mutation was created using 129S6/SvEvTac-derived SM1 embryonic stem (ES) cells and maintained on that background by the donating laboratory.

Related Strains

Strains carrying   Hcrttm1Ywa allele
008867   B6.129S6-Hcrttm1Ywa/J
View Strains carrying   Hcrttm1Ywa     (1 strain)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
- Model with phenotypic similarity to human disease where etiologies involve orthologs. Human genes are associated with this disease. Orthologs of those genes appear in the mouse genotype(s).
Narcolepsy 1; NRCLP1
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Hcrttm1Ywa/Hcrttm1Ywa

        involves: 129S6/SvEvTac
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal gait
    • gait disturbances immediately precede 42% of abrupt arrests in activity during a narcoleptic episode, but never precede gradual arrests   (MGI Ref ID J:83817)
  • abnormal sleep pattern
    • wakefulness is disrupted, with mice showing higher frequencies of awake episodes during the light and dark phases and severely diminished durations of wakefulness episodes over the entire dark phase   (MGI Ref ID J:83817)
    • abnormal non-rapid eye movement sleep pattern
      • non-REM sleep is disrupted, with mice showing higher frequencies of non-REM sleep episodes during the dark phase and a reduction in durations of non-REM sleep, especially at night   (MGI Ref ID J:83817)
    • abnormal paradoxical sleep pattern
      • mice show a reduced mean interval between REM sleep episodes during the dark phase and reduced latencies to REM sleep during both phases   (MGI Ref ID J:83817)
      • increased frequency of paradoxical sleep
        • 75% increase in the amount of time in REM sleep over the entire dark period and a compensatory reduction during the light phase   (MGI Ref ID J:83817)
    • fragmentation of sleep/wake states
      • wake and non-REM sleep bouts are shorter and more frequent   (MGI Ref ID J:170824)
    • narcolepsy
      • episodes of abrupt cessation of purposeful activity and spontaneous transitions directly to cataplexy-like attacks of REM sleep with atonia or more rarely, of non-REM sleep in the pre-REM stage with atonia   (MGI Ref ID J:83817)
      • mice also show episodes of gradual cessation of purposeful activity and a transition to non-REM sleep   (MGI Ref ID J:83817)
      • abrupt arrests are associated with emotive motor activity such as vigorous grooming, ambulation, and climbing, while gradual arrests are preceded by quiet wakefulness   (MGI Ref ID J:83817)
      • gradual arrests are occasionally accompanied by automatic behavior such as stereotypic continued chewing of food after the onset of non-REM sleep   (MGI Ref ID J:83817)
      • 38% of gradual arrests initiate with non-REM sleep but progress rapidly to REM sleep   (MGI Ref ID J:83817)
      • treatment with the anticataplectic agent clomipramine decreases the frequency of abrupt arrests but does not affect gradual arrests, while treatment with clomipramine and caffeine results in suppression of both abrupt and gradual arrests   (MGI Ref ID J:83817)
  • muscle phenotype
  • abnormal muscle tone
    • frequent cataplexy   (MGI Ref ID J:170824)

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Hcrttm1Ywa/Hcrt+

        involves: 129S6/SvEvTac * C57BL/6
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • increased susceptibility to age related obesity
    • female but not male mice over 100 days in age have significant increases in body weight compared to wild-type mice but not as great as in homozygote mice   (MGI Ref ID J:128233)

Hcrttm1Ywa/Hcrttm1Ywa

        involves: 129S6/SvEvTac * C57BL/6
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal locomotor behavior   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
    • abnormal gait
      • ataxic gait appears 1-3 sec before episodes of behavior arrest in about 27% of cases   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
    • abnormal locomotor activation
      • side to side rocking motion in about 75% of behavior arrest episodes   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
      • less affected by intruders   (MGI Ref ID J:85405)
      • behavioral arrest
        • frequent periods of behavioral arrest at night when mice are most active   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
        • sudden collapse of head and neck and body falls to the cage floor   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
        • episodes more frequent and begin earlier when mice are housed in groups   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
        • often preceded by chasing, tail biting and social grooming   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
      • hypoactivity
        • dark phase activity significantly reduced   (MGI Ref ID J:85405)
      • increased vertical activity
        • burrowing and climbing activity frequently precede posture change   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
  • abnormal posture
    • sudden sustained changes in posture which end when activity resumes   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
    • 8-27 episodes in a 4 hour period averaging about 66 seconds in length   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
  • narcolepsy
    • shortened REM sleep latency during light phase   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
    • increased time and duration of REM sleep during dark phase   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
    • decreased time between REM episodes   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
    • increased non REM sleep time   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
    • decreased awake time and shorter duration of awake episodes   (MGI Ref ID J:57124)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • abnormal systemic arterial blood pressure
    • less affected by intruders   (MGI Ref ID J:85405)
    • less affected by hexamethonium and prazosin   (MGI Ref ID J:85405)
    • decreased mean systemic arterial blood pressure
      • significantly reduced   (MGI Ref ID J:85405)
      • bicucullin stimulation ineffective at very low doses and of shorter duration at higher dose   (MGI Ref ID J:85405)
  • increased heart rate
    • ephemeral increase at low doses   (MGI Ref ID J:85405)
    • less effect of intruders   (MGI Ref ID J:85405)
  • respiratory system phenotype
  • increased pulmonary respiratory rate
    • respiratory frequency is significantly increased   (MGI Ref ID J:85405)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal nervous system electrophysiology
    • effect of bicucullin on EEG is of short duration even at higher doses   (MGI Ref ID J:85405)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • increased susceptibility to age related obesity
    • female but not male mice over 100 days in age have significant increases in body weight compared to littermate controls   (MGI Ref ID J:128233)

Hcrttm1Ywa/Hcrttm1Ywa

        B6.129S6-Hcrttm1Ywa
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal circadian temperature homeostasis
    • loss of rhythmicity in body temperature fluctuations   (MGI Ref ID J:111673)
    • drop in body temperature while resting is much less than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:111673)
    • core body temperature is higher during dark phase and normal in light phase   (MGI Ref ID J:111673)
  • abnormal sleep pattern
    • periods of wakefulness not significantly reduced   (MGI Ref ID J:111673)
    • periods of wakefulness much more fragmented   (MGI Ref ID J:111673)
    • loss of rhythmicity to periods of wakefulness   (MGI Ref ID J:111673)
  • hypoactivity
    • dark phase activity significantly reduced   (MGI Ref ID J:111673)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal circadian temperature homeostasis
    • loss of rhythmicity in body temperature fluctuations   (MGI Ref ID J:111673)
    • drop in body temperature while resting is much less than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:111673)
    • core body temperature is higher during dark phase and normal in light phase   (MGI Ref ID J:111673)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Neurobiology Research
Behavioral and Learning Defects

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Hcrttm1Ywa
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Masashi Yanagisawa
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout, Reporter)
Common Name(s) OKO; ORX-KO; Ox-; orexin KO; orexin knockout; orexin-tau-LacZ;
Mutation Made ByDr. Masashi Yanagisawa,   Southwestern Medical School
Strain of Origin129S6/SvEvTac
ES Cell Line NameSM1
ES Cell Line Strain129S6/SvEvTac
Gene Symbol and Name Hcrt, hypocretin
Chromosome 11
Gene Common Name(s) NRCLP1; OX; PPOX; orexin A; orexin B; orexin-A;
General Note Phenotypic Similarity to Human Syndrome: Narcolepsy, Sporatic Nonfamilial J:83817.
Molecular Note A neomycin-lacZ cassette replaced exon 1 of the gene. In situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and radioimmunoassay of homozygous mutant mice brain failed to detect either orexin-A or orexin-B peptides. [MGI Ref ID J:136109] [MGI Ref ID J:57124]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Chemelli RM; Willie JT; Sinton CM; Elmquist JK; Scammell T; Lee C; Richardson JA; Williams SC; Xiong Y; Kisanuki Y; Fitch TE; Nakazato M; Hammer RE; Saper CB; Yanagisawa M. 1999. Narcolepsy in orexin knockout mice: molecular genetics of sleep regulation [see comments] Cell 98(4):437-51. [PubMed: 10481909]  [MGI Ref ID J:57124]

Additional References

Hcrttm1Ywa related

Adeghate E; Fernandez-Cabezudo M; Hameed R; El-Hasasna H; El Wasila M; Abbas T; Al-Ramadi B. 2010. Orexin-1 receptor co-localizes with pancreatic hormones in islet cells and modulates the outcome of streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus. PLoS One 5(1):e8587. [PubMed: 20062799]  [MGI Ref ID J:157243]

Anaclet C; Parmentier R; Ouk K; Guidon G; Buda C; Sastre JP; Akaoka H; Sergeeva OA; Yanagisawa M; Ohtsu H; Franco P; Haas HL; Lin JS. 2009. Orexin/hypocretin and histamine: distinct roles in the control of wakefulness demonstrated using knock-out mouse models. J Neurosci 29(46):14423-38. [PubMed: 19923277]  [MGI Ref ID J:158279]

Blumberg MS; Coleman CM; Johnson ED; Shaw C. 2007. Developmental divergence of sleep-wake patterns in orexin knockout and wild-type mice. Eur J Neurosci 25(2):512-8. [PubMed: 17284193]  [MGI Ref ID J:118628]

Burgess CR; Oishi Y; Mochizuki T; Peever JH; Scammell TE. 2013. Amygdala lesions reduce cataplexy in orexin knock-out mice. J Neurosci 33(23):9734-42. [PubMed: 23739970]  [MGI Ref ID J:198645]

Clark EL; Baumann CR; Cano G; Scammell TE; Mochizuki T. 2009. Feeding-elicited cataplexy in orexin knockout mice. Neuroscience 161(4):970-7. [PubMed: 19362119]  [MGI Ref ID J:152979]

Espana RA; Oleson EB; Locke JL; Brookshire BR; Roberts DC; Jones SR. 2010. The hypocretin-orexin system regulates cocaine self-administration via actions on the mesolimbic dopamine system. Eur J Neurosci 31(2):336-48. [PubMed: 20039943]  [MGI Ref ID J:171793]

Fujiki N; Yoshida Y; Zhang S; Sakurai T; Yanagisawa M; Nishino S. 2006. Sex difference in body weight gain and leptin signaling in hypocretin/orexin deficient mouse models. Peptides 27(9):2326-31. [PubMed: 16626839]  [MGI Ref ID J:128233]

Georgescu D; Zachariou V; Barrot M; Mieda M; Willie JT; Eisch AJ; Yanagisawa M; Nestler EJ; DiLeone RJ. 2003. Involvement of the lateral hypothalamic peptide orexin in morphine dependence and withdrawal. J Neurosci 23(8):3106-11. [PubMed: 12716916]  [MGI Ref ID J:83334]

Hara J; Yanagisawa M; Sakurai T. 2005. Difference in obesity phenotype between orexin-knockout mice and orexin neuron-deficient mice with same genetic background and environmental conditions. Neurosci Lett 380(3):239-42. [PubMed: 15862893]  [MGI Ref ID J:104865]

Hasegawa E; Yanagisawa M; Sakurai T; Mieda M. 2014. Orexin neurons suppress narcolepsy via 2 distinct efferent pathways. J Clin Invest 124(2):604-16. [PubMed: 24382351]  [MGI Ref ID J:208001]

Honda M; Eriksson KS; Zhang S; Tanaka S; Lin L; Salehi A; Hesla PE; Maehlen J; Gaus SE; Yanagisawa M; Sakurai T; Taheri S; Tsuchiya K; Honda Y; Mignot E. 2009. IGFBP3 colocalizes with and regulates hypocretin (orexin). PLoS ONE 4(1):e4254. [PubMed: 19158946]  [MGI Ref ID J:144841]

Hondo M; Nagai K; Ohno K; Kisanuki Y; Willie JT; Watanabe T; Yanagisawa M; Sakurai T. 2010. Histamine-1 receptor is not required as a downstream effector of orexin-2 receptor in maintenance of basal sleep/wake states. Acta Physiol (Oxf) 198(3):287-94. [PubMed: 19694625]  [MGI Ref ID J:201941]

Hunsley MS; Curtis WR; Palmiter RD. 2006. Behavioral and sleep/wake characteristics of mice lacking norepinephrine and hypocretin. Genes Brain Behav 5(6):451-7. [PubMed: 16923149]  [MGI Ref ID J:123643]

Kaur S; Thankachan S; Begum S; Blanco-Centurion C; Sakurai T; Yanagisawa M; Shiromani PJ. 2008. Entrainment of temperature and activity rhythms to restricted feeding in orexin knock out mice. Brain Res 1205:47-54. [PubMed: 18343358]  [MGI Ref ID J:136109]

Kaur S; Thankachan S; Begum S; Liu M; Blanco-Centurion C; Shiromani PJ. 2009. Hypocretin-2 saporin lesions of the ventrolateral periaquaductal gray (vlPAG) increase REM sleep in hypocretin knockout mice. PLoS One 4(7):e6346. [PubMed: 19623260]  [MGI Ref ID J:151539]

Kayaba Y; Nakamura A; Kasuya Y; Ohuchi T; Yanagisawa M; Komuro I; Fukuda Y; Kuwaki T. 2003. Attenuated defense response and low basal blood pressure in orexin knockout mice. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 285(3):R581-93. [PubMed: 12750151]  [MGI Ref ID J:85405]

Lutter M; Krishnan V; Russo SJ; Jung S; McClung CA; Nestler EJ. 2008. Orexin signaling mediates the antidepressant-like effect of calorie restriction. J Neurosci 28(12):3071-5. [PubMed: 18354010]  [MGI Ref ID J:149337]

Lutter M; Sakata I; Osborne-Lawrence S; Rovinsky SA; Anderson JG; Jung S; Birnbaum S; Yanagisawa M; Elmquist JK; Nestler EJ; Zigman JM. 2008. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin defends against depressive symptoms of chronic stress. Nat Neurosci 11(7):752-3. [PubMed: 18552842]  [MGI Ref ID J:139356]

Mieda M; Hasegawa E; Kisanuki YY; Sinton CM; Yanagisawa M; Sakurai T. 2011. Differential Roles of Orexin Receptor-1 and -2 in the Regulation of Non-REM and REM Sleep. J Neurosci 31(17):6518-26. [PubMed: 21525292]  [MGI Ref ID J:171419]

Mochizuki T; Arrigoni E; Marcus JN; Clark EL; Yamamoto M; Honer M; Borroni E; Lowell BB; Elmquist JK; Scammell TE. 2011. Orexin receptor 2 expression in the posterior hypothalamus rescues sleepiness in narcoleptic mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108(11):4471-6. [PubMed: 21368172]  [MGI Ref ID J:170824]

Mochizuki T; Crocker A; McCormack S; Yanagisawa M; Sakurai T; Scammell TE. 2004. Behavioral state instability in orexin knock-out mice. J Neurosci 24(28):6291-300. [PubMed: 15254084]  [MGI Ref ID J:97271]

Mochizuki T; Klerman EB; Sakurai T; Scammell TE. 2006. Elevated body temperature during sleep in orexin knockout mice. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 291(3):R533-40. [PubMed: 16556901]  [MGI Ref ID J:111673]

Mori T; Ito S; Kuwaki T; Yanagisawa M; Sakurai T; Sawaguchi T. 2010. Monoaminergic neuronal changes in orexin deficient mice. Neuropharmacology 58(4-5):826-32. [PubMed: 19703479]  [MGI Ref ID J:179565]

Nakamura A; Zhang W; Yanagisawa M; Fukuda Y; Kuwaki T. 2007. Vigilance state-dependent attenuation of hypercapnic chemoreflex and exaggerated sleep apnea in orexin knockout mice. J Appl Physiol 102(1):241-8. [PubMed: 16959906]  [MGI Ref ID J:135855]

Oishi Y; Williams RH; Agostinelli L; Arrigoni E; Fuller PM; Mochizuki T; Saper CB; Scammell TE. 2013. Role of the medial prefrontal cortex in cataplexy. J Neurosci 33(23):9743-51. [PubMed: 23739971]  [MGI Ref ID J:198644]

Radzikinas K; Aven L; Jiang Z; Tran T; Paez-Cortez J; Boppidi K; Lu J; Fine A; Ai X. 2011. A Shh/miR-206/BDNF Cascade Coordinates Innervation and Formation of Airway Smooth Muscle. J Neurosci 31(43):15407-15. [PubMed: 22031887]  [MGI Ref ID J:177268]

Sellayah D; Bharaj P; Sikder D. 2011. Orexin is required for brown adipose tissue development, differentiation, and function. Cell Metab 14(4):478-90. [PubMed: 21982708]  [MGI Ref ID J:177647]

Sharf R; Guarnieri DJ; Taylor JR; DiLeone RJ. 2010. Orexin mediates morphine place preference, but not morphine-induced hyperactivity or sensitization. Brain Res 1317:24-32. [PubMed: 20034477]  [MGI Ref ID J:158787]

Soya S; Shoji H; Hasegawa E; Hondo M; Miyakawa T; Yanagisawa M; Mieda M; Sakurai T. 2013. Orexin receptor-1 in the locus coeruleus plays an important role in cue-dependent fear memory consolidation. J Neurosci 33(36):14549-57. [PubMed: 24005305]  [MGI Ref ID J:201746]

Thankachan S; Kaur S; Shiromani PJ. 2009. Activity of pontine neurons during sleep and cataplexy in hypocretin knock-out mice. J Neurosci 29(5):1580-5. [PubMed: 19193905]  [MGI Ref ID J:144940]

Tsuneki H; Murata S; Anzawa Y; Soeda Y; Tokai E; Wada T; Kimura I; Yanagisawa M; Sakurai T; Sasaoka T. 2008. Age-related insulin resistance in hypothalamus and peripheral tissues of orexin knockout mice. Diabetologia 51(4):657-67. [PubMed: 18256806]  [MGI Ref ID J:137955]

Willie JT; Chemelli RM; Sinton CM; Tokita S; Williams SC; Kisanuki YY; Marcus JN; Lee C; Elmquist JK; Kohlmeier KA; Leonard CS; Richardson JA; Hammer RE; Yanagisawa M. 2003. Distinct narcolepsy syndromes in Orexin receptor-2 and Orexin null mice: molecular genetic dissection of Non-REM and REM sleep regulatory processes. Neuron 38(5):715-30. [PubMed: 12797957]  [MGI Ref ID J:83817]

Zhang W; Sunanaga J; Takahashi Y; Mori T; Sakurai T; Kanmura Y; Kuwaki T. 2010. Orexin neurons are indispensable for stress-induced thermogenesis in mice. J Physiol 588(Pt 21):4117-29. [PubMed: 20807795]  [MGI Ref ID J:179546]

Health & husbandry

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryWhen maintained as a live colony, homozygotes may be bred.

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $2525.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We willfulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3283.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We willfulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

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In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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