Strain Name:

C;129-Hsf1tm1Ijb/J

Stock Number:

010543

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Availability:

Cryopreserved - Ready for recovery

Mice that are homozygous for this targeted mutation of Hsf1 exhibit widespread phenotypic effects including incomplete prenatal lethality, slowed growth, female infertility, and impaired antigen presentation. This mutant mouse strain may be useful in studies of the role of heat shock response in inflammation and immune response, oxidative stress, circadian rhythm, anxiety, thermotolerance, and tumorigenesis.

Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Type Mutant Stock; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Mating System+/+ sibling x Heterozygote         (Female x Male)   16-SEP-09
Specieslaboratory mouse
GenerationF?+F6pN1
Generation Definitions
 
Donating Investigator Ivor J Benjamin,   University of Utah School of Medicine

Description
Mice that are heterozygous for this targeted mutation are viable, fertile, normal in size and do not display any gross physical or behavioral abnormalities. A truncated gene product (mRNA) is detected by Northern blot analysis of embryonic cells. No gene product (protein) is detected by Western blot analysis of non-treated and heat shocked cells or brain, testis, heart and liver tissue. The prenatal lethal phenotype of homozygous mice is more severe on the 129 background than on BALB/c, C57BL/6, or ICR backgrounds. Surviving homozygotes have slowed growth with body weights approximately 78% of normal at eight weeks of age. Homozygotes exhibit abnormal chorioallantoic placenta (thinned spongiotrophoblast layer). Homozygous females are infertile due to impaired meiosis and zygotic cell division. Homozygotes are more resistant to experimentally induced skin tumors and exhibit a lower tumor burden than wild-type controls. Cultured MEFs from homozygotes are less sensitive to glucose deprivation and display reduced glucose uptake. Homozygotes have abnormal brain morphology including enlarged ventricles (ventriculomegaly), reduced white matter, astrogliosis, neurodegeneration and spongiosis. Heterozygotes exhibit an intermediate phenotype of the abnormal CNS morphology. Cultured cells isolated from homozygotes are more susceptible to heat induced apoptosis due to lack of thermotolerance (preconditioning before lethal heat shock). In heart tissue from homozygotes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity is reduced by a third. Homozygotes exhibit increased oxidative damage of mitochondrial proteins in cardiac tissue and inefficient antigen presentation in the MHC class I pathway. Although, mast cells from the bone marrow of homozygotes do not produce HSP70 with heat shock or acetylsalicylic acid induction, heat shock still inhibits degranulation. Lung fibroblasts isolated from homozygotes are not rescued by carbon monoxide cytoprotective treatment when challenged with induced apoptosis or endotoxin. Cadmium activated heat shock response is absent in homozygotes which are more sensitive to cadmium induced lung toxicity. Although behavioral symptoms and neuropathology onset occurs at the same time as wild-type controls, homozygotes succumb more rapidly to experimentally induced prion disease. Homozygotes display prolonged circadian period with longer free-running period than wild-type controls. Mutant mice also exhibit reduced anxiety-like and exploratory behaviors, impaired short term memory, and increased neuronal apoptosis and anxiety induced by chronic unpredictable stressors. This mutant mouse strain may be useful in studies of the role of heat shock response in inflammation and immune response, oxidative stress, circadian rhythm, anxiety, thermotolerance, and tumorigenesis.

In an attempt to offer alleles on well-characterized or multiple genetic backgrounds, alleles are frequently moved to a genetic background different from that on which an allele was first characterized. This is the case for the strain above. It should be noted that the phenotype could vary from that originally described. We will modify the strain description if necessary as published results become available.

Control Information

  Control
   Wild-type from the colony
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying other alleles of Hsf1
018582   B6N(Cg)-Hsf1tm1.1(KOMP)Vlcg/J
View Strains carrying other alleles of Hsf1     (1 strain)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Hsf1tm1Ijb/Hsf1tm1Ijb

        either: (involves: 129S6/SvEvTac * 129X1/SvJ) or (involves: 129S6/SvEvTac * BALB/c) or (involves: 129S6/SvEvTac * C57BL/6J) or (involves: 129S6/SvEvTac * ICR)
  • mortality/aging
  • partial prenatal lethality
    • fewer homozygotes born than expected   (MGI Ref ID J:73593)
    • lethality worse on a 129 background than on BALB/c, C57BL/6, or IRC backgrounds   (MGI Ref ID J:58383)
    • death starts to occur around E14   (MGI Ref ID J:58383)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • decreased body weight
    • significantly lower body weights observed in the first post natal week   (MGI Ref ID J:58383)
  • postnatal growth retardation
    • growth consistently lagged past weaning   (MGI Ref ID J:58383)
    • at 8 weeks of age, male weights 77% normal and female weights 78% normal   (MGI Ref ID J:58383)
  • embryogenesis phenotype
  • abnormal extraembryonic tissue morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:58383)
    • abnormal placenta labyrinth morphology
      • reduced size, fibrin deposits, vacuolization, degeneration and hemorrhages   (MGI Ref ID J:58383)
    • decreased spongiotrophoblast size
      • thinning of spongiotrophoblast at E11.5 and becoming more pronounced at E13.5   (MGI Ref ID J:58383)
  • failure of zygotic cell division
    • zygotes from homozygous mothers fail to develop even when transplanted to wild-type mothers   (MGI Ref ID J:65267)
    • block at 1 cell stage, few ever reach 2 cell stage   (MGI Ref ID J:65267)
  • reproductive system phenotype
  • female infertility
    • females infertile but males with normal fertility   (MGI Ref ID J:58383)
    • zygotes fail to develop in homozygous mothers regardless of genotype   (MGI Ref ID J:65267)
  • immune system phenotype
  • increased susceptibility to bacterial infection
    • significantly reduced survival when challenged with lipopolysaccharide   (MGI Ref ID J:58383)
  • increased tumor necrosis factor secretion
    • production increases 2X in response to lipopolysaccharide   (MGI Ref ID J:58383)

Hsf1tm1Ijb/Hsf1tm1Ijb

        129.129S6-Hsf1tm1Ijb
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal astrocyte morphology
    • longer processes   (MGI Ref ID J:93600)
  • abnormal brain morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:93600)
    • abnormal brain ventricle morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:93600)
      • dilated lateral ventricles   (MGI Ref ID J:93600)
      • dilated third ventricle
    • abnormal brain white matter morphology
      • reduced white matter   (MGI Ref ID J:93600)
      • abnormal corpus callosum morphology
        • spongiosis   (MGI Ref ID J:93600)
    • abnormal striatum morphology
      • spongiosis in the caudate putamen and external capsule   (MGI Ref ID J:93600)
      • abnormal putamen morphology
        • neurodegeneration in the caudate putamen   (MGI Ref ID J:93600)

Hsf1tm1Ijb/Hsf1tm1Ijb

        involves: 129S6/SvEvTac
  • reproductive system phenotype
  • abnormal chromosome pairing during meiosis
    • the percentage of univalent chromosomes is increased, single chromatids are present, and an increase in the percentage of separated centromeres suggesting impaired cohesion in oocytes at metaphase I   (MGI Ref ID J:175085)
  • abnormal female meiosis
    • at P1 only 51% of oocytes have reached the diplotene stage compared to 80% of oocytes in heterozygous controls   (MGI Ref ID J:175085)
    • in pachytene oocytes the number of MSH4 foci is significantly reduced and the DNA repair process is abnormal   (MGI Ref ID J:175085)
    • in oocytes chromosomal length is significantly increased at metaphase I   (MGI Ref ID J:175085)
    • significantly blocked in the pro-Mi/MI phase   (MGI Ref ID J:175085)
  • abnormal meiotic spindle assembly checkpoint
    • persistent activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint in oocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:175085)
  • abnormal synaptonemal complex
    • in oocytes the length of the synaptonemal complex (SC) is significantly increased   (MGI Ref ID J:175085)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Apoptosis Research

Cancer Research
Other
Tumor Resistance

Cell Biology Research
Transcriptional Regulation

Developmental Biology Research
Embryonic Lethality (Homozygous)
      incomplete
Neurodevelopmental Defects
Perinatal Lethality

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
CD Antigens, Antigen Receptors, and Histocompatibility Markers
      genes regulating susceptibility to infectious disease and endotoxin
Immunodeficiency
      Mast Cell Deficiency

Neurobiology Research
Behavioral and Learning Defects
Circadian Rhythms
Neurodevelopmental Defects

Reproductive Biology Research
Fertility Defects
      females only

Research Tools
Apoptosis Research
Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
      Mast Cell Deficiency
      genes regulating susceptibility to infectious disease and endotoxin
Reproductive Biology Research
      oocyte
Toxicology Research
      free radical research

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Hsf1tm1Ijb
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Ivor J Benjamin
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Common Name(s) Hsf1-;
Mutation Made ByDr. Chengkai Dai,   JAX
Strain of Origin129S6/SvEvTac
Gene Symbol and Name Hsf1, heat shock factor 1
Chromosome 15
Gene Common Name(s) AA960185; HSTF1; expressed sequence AA960185; heat shock transcription factor 1;
Molecular Note A 1.8kb genomic fragment containing all or part of 6 exons was replaced by a neomycin resistance cassette. These sequences encode half the DNA binding domain and the adjacent oligomerization domain of the protein. Northern blot analysis on RNA derived from homozygous embryonic cells demonstated that a mutant, truncated transcript was produced from this allele. However, western blot analysis indicated that no protein was detectable in cells derived from homozygous embryos. [MGI Ref ID J:73593]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Hsf1tm1Ijb, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

McMillan DR; Xiao X; Shao L; Graves K; Benjamin IJ. 1998. Targeted disruption of heat shock transcription factor 1 abolishes thermotolerance and protection against heat-inducible apoptosis. J Biol Chem 273(13):7523-8. [PubMed: 9516453]  [MGI Ref ID J:73593]

Additional References

Hsf1tm1Ijb related

Akerfelt M; Vihervaara A; Laiho A; Conter A; Christians ES; Sistonen L; Henriksson E. 2010. Heat shock transcription factor 1 localizes to sex chromatin during meiotic repression. J Biol Chem 285(45):34469-76. [PubMed: 20802198]  [MGI Ref ID J:166875]

Bierkamp C; Luxey M; Metchat A; Audouard C; Dumollard R; Christians E. 2010. Lack of maternal Heat Shock Factor 1 results in multiple cellular and developmental defects, including mitochondrial damage and altered redox homeostasis, and leads to reduced survival of mammalian oocytes and embryos. Dev Biol 339(2):338-53. [PubMed: 20045681]  [MGI Ref ID J:159123]

Bishop CE; Mitchell M; Avner P. 1989. Comparative mapping of murine X and autosomal sequences homologous to the Human Y located testis determining region. Cytogenet Cell Genet 51:963 (Abstr. 2300).  [MGI Ref ID J:12519]

Boyault C; Zhang Y; Fritah S; Caron C; Gilquin B; Kwon SH; Garrido C; Yao TP; Vourc'h C; Matthias P; Khochbin S. 2007. HDAC6 controls major cell response pathways to cytotoxic accumulation of protein aggregates. Genes Dev 21(17):2172-81. [PubMed: 17785525]  [MGI Ref ID J:125219]

Chen S; Zuo X; Yang M; Lu H; Wang N; Wang K; Tu Z; Chen G; Liu M; Liu K; Xiao X. 2012. Severe multiple organ injury in HSF1 knockout mice induced by lipopolysaccharide is associated with an increase in neutrophil infiltration and surface expression of adhesion molecules. J Leukoc Biol 92(4):851-7. [PubMed: 22753951]  [MGI Ref ID J:189528]

Christians E; Davis AA; Thomas SD; Benjamin IJ. 2000. Maternal effect of Hsf1 on reproductive success Nature 407(6805):693-4. [PubMed: 11048707]  [MGI Ref ID J:65267]

Cooper ZA; Ghosh A; Gupta A; Maity T; Benjamin IJ; Vogel SN; Hasday JD; Singh IS. 2010. Febrile-range temperature modifies cytokine gene expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages by differentially modifying NF-{kappa}B recruitment to cytokine gene promoters. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 298(1):C171-81. [PubMed: 19846753]  [MGI Ref ID J:155902]

Dai C; Santagata S; Tang Z; Shi J; Cao J; Kwon H; Bronson RT; Whitesell L; Lindquist S. 2012. Loss of tumor suppressor NF1 activates HSF1 to promote carcinogenesis. J Clin Invest 122(10):3742-54. [PubMed: 22945628]  [MGI Ref ID J:191670]

Dai C; Whitesell L; Rogers AB; Lindquist S. 2007. Heat shock factor 1 is a powerful multifaceted modifier of carcinogenesis. Cell 130(6):1005-18. [PubMed: 17889646]  [MGI Ref ID J:129386]

Dragovic SM; Hill T; Christianson GJ; Kim S; Elliott T; Scott D; Roopenian DC; Van Kaer L; Joyce S. 2011. Proteasomes, TAP, and endoplasmic reticulum-associated aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing control CD4+ Th cell responses by regulating indirect presentation of MHC class II-restricted cytoplasmic antigens. J Immunol 186(12):6683-92. [PubMed: 21572029]  [MGI Ref ID J:175483]

Gabai VL; Meng L; Kim G; Mills TA; Benjamin IJ; Sherman MY. 2012. Heat shock transcription factor Hsf1 is involved in tumor progression via regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and RNA-binding protein HuR. Mol Cell Biol 32(5):929-40. [PubMed: 22215620]  [MGI Ref ID J:183719]

Gandhapudi SK; Murapa P; Threlkeld ZD; Ward M; Sarge KD; Snow C; Woodward JG. 2013. Heat shock transcription factor 1 is activated as a consequence of lymphocyte activation and regulates a major proteostasis network in T cells critical for cell division during stress. J Immunol 191(8):4068-79. [PubMed: 24043900]  [MGI Ref ID J:206264]

Kim HP; Wang X; Zhang J; Suh GY; Benjamin IJ; Ryter SW; Choi AM. 2005. Heat shock protein-70 mediates the cytoprotective effect of carbon monoxide: involvement of p38 beta MAPK and heat shock factor-1. J Immunol 175(4):2622-9. [PubMed: 16081837]  [MGI Ref ID J:107488]

Krishnamurthy K; Vedam K; Kanagasabai R; Druhan LJ; Ilangovan G. 2012. Heat shock factor-1 knockout induces multidrug resistance gene, MDR1b, and enhances P-glycoprotein (ABCB1)-based drug extrusion in the heart. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109(23):9023-8. [PubMed: 22615365]  [MGI Ref ID J:184746]

Le Masson F; Razak Z; Kaigo M; Audouard C; Charry C; Cooke H; Westwood JT; Christians ES. 2011. Identification of Heat Shock Factor 1 Molecular and Cellular Targets during Embryonic and Adult Female Meiosis. Mol Cell Biol 31(16):3410-23. [PubMed: 21690297]  [MGI Ref ID J:175085]

Malhotra V; Kooy NW; Denenberg AG; Dunsmore KE; Wong HR. 2002. Ablation of the heat shock factor-1 increases susceptibility to hyperoxia-mediated cellular injury. Exp Lung Res 28(8):609-22. [PubMed: 12490036]  [MGI Ref ID J:103292]

Metchat A; Akerfelt M; Bierkamp C; Delsinne V; Sistonen L; Alexandre H; Christians ES. 2009. Mammalian heat shock factor 1 is essential for oocyte meiosis and directly regulates Hsp90alpha expression. J Biol Chem 284(14):9521-8. [PubMed: 19158073]  [MGI Ref ID J:148816]

Mortaz E; Redegeld FA; Bloksma N; Dunsmore K; Denenberg A; Wong HR; Nijkamp FP; Engels F. 2006. Induction of HSP70 is dispensable for anti-inflammatory action of heat shock or NSAIDs in mast cells. Exp Hematol 34(4):414-23. [PubMed: 16569588]  [MGI Ref ID J:108623]

Mortaz E; Redegeld FA; Nijkamp FP; Wong HR; Engels F. 2006. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced release of HSP70 from mast cells results in cell activation through TLR pathway. Exp Hematol 34(1):8-18. [PubMed: 16413386]  [MGI Ref ID J:104576]

Mortaz E; Redegeld FA; van der Heijden MW; Wong HR; Nijkamp FP; Engels F. 2005. Mast cell activation is differentially affected by heat shock. Exp Hematol 33(8):944-52. [PubMed: 16038788]  [MGI Ref ID J:100134]

Murapa P; Gandhapudi S; Skaggs HS; Sarge KD; Woodward JG. 2007. Physiological fever temperature induces a protective stress response in T lymphocytes mediated by heat shock factor-1 (HSF1). J Immunol 179(12):8305-12. [PubMed: 18056375]  [MGI Ref ID J:155196]

Murapa P; Ward MR; Gandhapudi SK; Woodward JG; D'Orazio SE. 2011. Heat shock factor 1 protects mice from rapid death during Listeria monocytogenes infection by regulating expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha during fever. Infect Immun 79(1):177-84. [PubMed: 20956571]  [MGI Ref ID J:167083]

Nagarsekar A; Tulapurkar ME; Singh IS; Atamas SP; Shah NG; Hasday JD. 2012. Hyperthermia promotes and prevents respiratory epithelial apoptosis through distinct mechanisms. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 47(6):824-33. [PubMed: 22962066]  [MGI Ref ID J:204044]

Reinke H; Saini C; Fleury-Olela F; Dibner C; Benjamin IJ; Schibler U. 2008. Differential display of DNA-binding proteins reveals heat-shock factor 1 as a circadian transcription factor. Genes Dev 22(3):331-45. [PubMed: 18245447]  [MGI Ref ID J:131534]

Salmand PA; Jungas T; Fernandez M; Conter A; Christians ES. 2008. Mouse heat-shock factor 1 (HSF1) is involved in testicular response to genotoxic stress induced by doxorubicin. Biol Reprod 79(6):1092-101. [PubMed: 18703420]  [MGI Ref ID J:145806]

Santos SD; Fernandes R; Saraiva MJ. 2010. The heat shock response modulates transthyretin deposition in the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. Neurobiol Aging 31(2):280-9. [PubMed: 18485534]  [MGI Ref ID J:156658]

Santos SD; Lambertsen KL; Clausen BH; Akinc A; Alvarez R; Finsen B; Saraiva MJ. 2010. CSF transthyretin neuroprotection in a mouse model of brain ischemia. J Neurochem 115(6):1434-44. [PubMed: 21044072]  [MGI Ref ID J:166900]

Santos SD; Saraiva MJ. 2004. Enlarged ventricles, astrogliosis and neurodegeneration in heat shock factor 1 null mouse brain. Neuroscience 126(3):657-63. [PubMed: 15183515]  [MGI Ref ID J:93600]

Steele AD; Hutter G; Jackson WS; Heppner FL; Borkowski AW; King OD; Raymond GJ; Aguzzi A; Lindquist S. 2008. Heat shock factor 1 regulates lifespan as distinct from disease onset in prion disease. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105(36):13626-31. [PubMed: 18757733]  [MGI Ref ID J:139124]

Turakhia S; Venkatakrishnan CD; Dunsmore K; Wong H; Kuppusamy P; Zweier JL; Ilangovan G. 2007. Doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity: direct correlation of cardiac fibroblast and H9c2 cell survival and aconitase activity with heat shock protein 27. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 293(5):H3111-21. [PubMed: 17873025]  [MGI Ref ID J:132130]

Vedam K; Nishijima Y; Druhan LJ; Khan M; Moldovan NI; Zweier JL; Ilangovan G. 2010. Role of heat shock factor-1 activation in the doxorubicin-induced heart failure in mice. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 298(6):H1832-41. [PubMed: 20363884]  [MGI Ref ID J:160451]

Venkatakrishnan CD; Dunsmore K; Wong H; Roy S; Sen CK; Wani A; Zweier JL; Ilangovan G. 2008. HSP27 regulates p53 transcriptional activity in doxorubicin-treated fibroblasts and cardiac H9c2 cells: p21 upregulation and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 294(4):H1736-44. [PubMed: 18263706]  [MGI Ref ID J:135253]

Wirth D; Christians E; Li X; Benjamin IJ; Gustin P. 2003. Use of Hsf1(-/-) mice reveals an essential role for HSF1 to protect lung against cadmium-induced injury. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 192(1):12-20. [PubMed: 14554099]  [MGI Ref ID J:126385]

Xiao X; Zuo X; Davis AA; McMillan DR; Curry BB; Richardson JA; Benjamin IJ. 1999. HSF1 is required for extra-embryonic development, postnatal growth and protection during inflammatory responses in mice. EMBO J 18(21):5943-52. [PubMed: 10545106]  [MGI Ref ID J:58383]

Yan LJ; Christians ES; Liu L; Xiao X; Sohal RS; Benjamin IJ. 2002. Mouse heat shock transcription factor 1 deficiency alters cardiac redox homeostasis and increases mitochondrial oxidative damage. EMBO J 21(19):5164-72. [PubMed: 12356732]  [MGI Ref ID J:111422]

Zheng H; Benjamin IJ; Basu S; Li Z. 2003. Heat shock factor 1-independent activation of dendritic cells by heat shock: implication for the uncoupling of heat-mediated immunoregulation from the heat shock response. Eur J Immunol 33(6):1754-62. [PubMed: 12778494]  [MGI Ref ID J:132537]

Zheng H; Li Z. 2004. Cutting edge: cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens to MHC class I molecule is regulated by a major transcription factor for heat shock proteins. J Immunol 173(10):5929-33. [PubMed: 15528326]  [MGI Ref ID J:94294]

Zhu X; Cheng M; Peng M; Xiao X; Yao S; Zhang X. 2008. Basal behavioral characterization of hsf1 deficient mice and its cellular and behavioral abnormalities underlying chronic unpredictable stressors. Behav Brain Res 193(2):225-9. [PubMed: 18601956]  [MGI Ref ID J:138203]

Health & husbandry

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryWhen maintaining a live colony, these mice can be bred as heterozygotes. Homozygotes have a prenatal lethal phenotype.
Mating System+/+ sibling x Heterozygote         (Female x Male)   16-SEP-09

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3300.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We willfulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $4290.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We willfulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Control Information

  Control
   Wild-type from the colony
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

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The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
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No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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