Strain Name:

C.DDD-plt/NknoJ

Stock Number:

012873

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Availability:

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These BALB/c-plt mice harbor the spontaneous plt (or "paucity of lymph node T cells") deletion of the Ccl19 and Ccl21a loci on chromosome 4. Lack of expression of these two CCR7 receptor ligands in the secondary lymphoid organs results in abnormal leukocyte migration and impaired immune response. These mutant mice may be useful in studying leukocyte migration into lymphatic tissues, elucidating differences between T cell and B cell trafficking, and the role of stromal cells in bringing naive T cells and dendritic cells together for the initiation of immune responses.

Description

Strain Information

Type Deletion;
Additional information on Mice with Chromosomal Aberrations.
Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Spontaneous Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Mating SystemHomozygote x Homozygote         (Female x Male)   10-JAN-12
Specieslaboratory mouse
GenerationN10+F10 (18-SEP-14)
Generation Definitions
 
Donating Investigator Hideki Nakano,   NIEHS/NIH

Description
Homozygous BALB/c-plt mice are viable and fertile, harboring the spontaneous plt (or "paucity of lymph node T cells") deletion of both the Ccl19 and Ccl21a loci on chromosome 4. Lack of expression of these two CCR7 receptor ligands in the secondary lymphoid organs results in abnormal leukocyte migration and impaired immune response. Specifically, homozygous mice have disrupted trafficking/homing of T cells and dendritic cells to lymphoid tissues. No reported abnormalities in B cell distribution/cellularity are reported for homozygous mice. Homozygous mice exhibit mature single-positive thymocyte arrest in the thymic cortex that results in defective formation of the medullary region of the thymus. Thymic export of T cells in these mice is compromised during the neonatal period but not in adulthood. While CCL21 expression is absent in lymphoid organs because of the Ccl21a deletion, CCL21 expression in non-lymphoid organs is observed because the upstream Cc121b locus remains intact. These BALB/c-plt mice may be useful in studying leukocyte migration into lymphatic tissues, elucidating differences between T cell and B cell trafficking, and the role of stromal cells in bringing naive T cells and dendritic cells together for the initiation of immune responses.

The donating investigator provided these BALB/c-plt mice, as well as plt mice congenic on a C57BL/6 genetic background (C57BL/6-plt ; Stock No. 012866). The donating investigator reports dendritic cell migration is severely impaired in both homozygous strains. In addition, they report T cell homing to lymph nodes is severely impaired in BALB/c-plt homozygotes, but mildly impaired in C57BL/6-plt homozygotes. BALB/c-plt homozygous mice have been shown to allow enhanced survival of MHC-mismatched islet allografts (this phenotype is not characterized for C57BL/6-plt mice [July 2010]).

Development
In 1997, Dr. Hideki Nakano (while at the Laboratory Animal Research Center, University of Tokyo, Japan) reported that their colony of DDD/1 inbred mice exhibited greatly diminished T cell numbers in lymph nodes. This spontaneous deletion, designated plt (or "paucity of lymph node T cells"), behaves as a single autosomal recessive allele and deletes a portion of chromosome 4 including both the Ccl19 (Epstein-Barr virus-induced molecule-1 ligand chemokine [ELC], ELC-atg, or Scya19) and Ccl21a (6CKine-ser, 6CKBAC2, secondary lymphoid organ chemokine [SLC], or SLC-Ser) loci. Some plt-mutant mice were backcrossed to BALB/cCrSlc (Japan SLC, Inc.) for ten generations to generate the BALB/c-plt congenic strain. Dr. Hideki Nakano (while at NIEHS/NIH, Research Triangle Park. North Carolina USA) sent homozygous BALB/c-plt females and males to The Jackson Laboratory Repository in 2010. Upon arrival, BALB/c-plt mice were bred with BALB/cByJ inbred mice (Stock No. 001026) for at least one generation to rederive the colony. During backcrossing, the Y chromosome may not have been fixed to the BALB/c genetic background.

The donating investigator reports that BALB/c-plt mice should have retained the plt haplotype at the Chemokine Locus on Mouse Chromosome 4 (Cklc4plt). Thus the genomic organization of Cklc4 would be the same as DDD/1-plt mice: Ccl21b intact and functional (Ccl21a deleted), Scya19-ps1 (Ccl19-ps1) intact (Scya19 [Ccl19] deleted), Scya27a (Ccl27a) intact and functional, and Il11ra1 intact and functional. The Jackson Laboratory will verify these mice harbor the plt deletion, but will not extensively verify the genetic composition of the other loci described for the Cklc4plt haplotype. The Cklc4plt haplotype will need to be verified by the investigator using the mice if necessary.

Control Information

  Control
   001026 BALB/cByJ (approximate)
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying   plt allele
012866   B6N.DDD-plt/NknoJ
View Strains carrying   plt     (1 strain)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
Models with phenotypic similarity to human diseases where etiology is unknown or involving genes where ortholog is unknown.
Sjogren Syndrome
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

plt/plt

        C.DDD-plt
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal T cell activation
    • mice exhibit impaired T cell activation following receipt of islet allografts compared to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:119345)
    • however, T cell alloresponses are normal   (MGI Ref ID J:119345)
  • decreased single-positive T cell number
    • the amount of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells are decreased in lymph nodes compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:119345)
    • however, remaining single positive cells undergo normal activation and proliferation alloresponses   (MGI Ref ID J:119345)
  • increased length of allograft survival
    • islet allografts function for over 120 days compared to in wild-type mice in which rejection occurs at 14 days   (MGI Ref ID J:119345)
    • unlike in wild-type mice, cardiac allograft survival time is doubled after the spleen is removed   (MGI Ref ID J:119345)
    • however, cardiac allografts are rejected at the same tempo as in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:119345)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal T cell activation
    • mice exhibit impaired T cell activation following receipt of islet allografts compared to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:119345)
    • however, T cell alloresponses are normal   (MGI Ref ID J:119345)
  • decreased single-positive T cell number
    • the amount of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells are decreased in lymph nodes compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:119345)
    • however, remaining single positive cells undergo normal activation and proliferation alloresponses   (MGI Ref ID J:119345)

plt/plt

        either: B6.DDD-plt or C.DDD-plt
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • abnormal gland morphology
    • as early as 5 weeks of age, mice exhibit lesions in exocrine glands unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
    • abnormal lacrimal gland morphology
      • lacrimal glands exhibit periductal lymphocyte infiltration causing destruction of acinar cells unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
    • abnormal parotid gland morphology
      • mice exhibit parotid gland tissue damage associated with inflammation unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
    • abnormal submandibular gland morphology
      • mice exhibit submandibular gland tissue damage associated with inflammation unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
  • lacrimal gland inflammation
    • lacrimal glands exhibit periductal lymphocyte infiltration unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
    • mice exhibit dacryoadenitis unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
  • salivary gland inflammation
    • parotid and submandicular glands exhibit periductal lymphocyte infiltration unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
    • mice exhibit sialadenitis unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte migration
    • FTY720-treated mice exhibit an accumulation of mature thymocytes in the cortex rather than medulla of the thymus as in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
  • increased inflammatory response
    • mice exhibit periductal lymphocyte infiltration in the lacrimal, parotid, and submandibular glands unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
    • lacrimal gland inflammation
      • lacrimal glands exhibit periductal lymphocyte infiltration unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
      • mice exhibit dacryoadenitis unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
    • salivary gland inflammation
      • parotid and submandicular glands exhibit periductal lymphocyte infiltration unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
      • mice exhibit sialadenitis unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
  • increased susceptibility to autoimmune disorder
    • mice exhibit autoimmune exocrinopathy unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal physiological response to xenobiotic
    • FTY720-treated mice exhibit an accumulation of mature thymocytes in the cortex rather than medulla of the thymus as in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
  • digestive/alimentary phenotype
  • abnormal parotid gland morphology
    • mice exhibit parotid gland tissue damage associated with inflammation unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
  • abnormal submandibular gland morphology
    • mice exhibit submandibular gland tissue damage associated with inflammation unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
  • salivary gland inflammation
    • parotid and submandicular glands exhibit periductal lymphocyte infiltration unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
    • mice exhibit sialadenitis unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
  • vision/eye phenotype
  • abnormal lacrimal gland morphology
    • lacrimal glands exhibit periductal lymphocyte infiltration causing destruction of acinar cells unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
  • lacrimal gland inflammation
    • lacrimal glands exhibit periductal lymphocyte infiltration unlike in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
    • mice exhibit dacryoadenitis unlike wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte migration
    • FTY720-treated mice exhibit an accumulation of mature thymocytes in the cortex rather than medulla of the thymus as in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte migration
    • FTY720-treated mice exhibit an accumulation of mature thymocytes in the cortex rather than medulla of the thymus as in similarly treated wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:110910)

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

plt/plt

        DDD/1
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal immune system organ morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:47819)
    • abnormal lymph node T cell domain morphology
      • low density of T cells in subcortical area   (MGI Ref ID J:47819)
      • T cells are hardly observed in T cell zones but are observed in B cell zones   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)
    • abnormal peripheral lymph node morphology
      • the amount of T cells in the subcortical area is extremely low   (MGI Ref ID J:47819)
    • abnormal spleen red pulp morphology
      • unlike in wild-type spleens, T cells are found within the red pulp   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)
    • abnormal spleen white pulp morphology
      • unlike in wild-type spleens, few T cells are found within the white pulp   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)
    • lymph node hypoplasia
      • the number of lymph node cells is reduced by 10 and 6 times in males and females, respectively, than in CBA and B6 mice   (MGI Ref ID J:15290)
      • T cell cellularity within the peripheral lymph nodes is decreased   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)
    • small Peyer's patches
      • most Peyer's patches are smaller than in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)
  • abnormal immune system physiology   (MGI Ref ID J:47819)
    • abnormal leukocyte migration
      • T cell migration into lymph nodes is defective   (MGI Ref ID J:47819)
      • T cell migration into peripheral lymph nodes, Peyer's patches and the spleen is defective   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)
      • however, neutrophil and macrophage recruitment stimulated by thioglycolate is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)
  • abnormal leukocyte cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:47819)
    • decreased T cell number
      • the total number of T cells in lymph nodes is smaller than in BALB/c mice   (MGI Ref ID J:47819)
      • decreased single-positive T cell number
        • the number of either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells is decreased compared to in CBA, B6, C3H and BALB/c mice   (MGI Ref ID J:15290)
    • increased T cell number
      • the number of T cells in the blood and spleen is increased compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:47819)
      • increased memory T cell number
        • the number of T cells in the peripheral lymph nodes and Peyer's patches with memory phenotype is increased compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte cell number   (MGI Ref ID J:47819)
    • decreased T cell number
      • the total number of T cells in lymph nodes is smaller than in BALB/c mice   (MGI Ref ID J:47819)
      • decreased single-positive T cell number
        • the number of either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells is decreased compared to in CBA, B6, C3H and BALB/c mice   (MGI Ref ID J:15290)
    • increased T cell number
      • the number of T cells in the blood and spleen is increased compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:47819)
      • increased memory T cell number
        • the number of T cells in the peripheral lymph nodes and Peyer's patches with memory phenotype is increased compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)
  • abnormal leukocyte migration
    • T cell migration into lymph nodes is defective   (MGI Ref ID J:47819)
    • T cell migration into peripheral lymph nodes, Peyer's patches and the spleen is defective   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)
    • however, neutrophil and macrophage recruitment stimulated by thioglycolate is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)
  • abnormal spleen red pulp morphology
    • unlike in wild-type spleens, T cells are found within the red pulp   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)
  • abnormal spleen white pulp morphology
    • unlike in wild-type spleens, few T cells are found within the white pulp   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte migration
    • T cell migration into lymph nodes is defective   (MGI Ref ID J:47819)
    • T cell migration into peripheral lymph nodes, Peyer's patches and the spleen is defective   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)
    • however, neutrophil and macrophage recruitment stimulated by thioglycolate is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:47460)

plt/plt

        B6.DDD-plt
  • immune system phenotype
  • *normal* immune system phenotype
    • no single positive T cell abnormalities other than the migration defect from cortex to medulla of the thymus   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
    • abnormal leukocyte migration
      • single positive T cells fail to localize to the medulla of the thymus in newborns   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
      • single positive T cells are retained in the cortex of the thymus   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
    • abnormal thymus cortex morphology
      • single positive thymocytes are retained by the cortex rather than migrating to the medulla   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
    • abnormal thymus medulla morphology
      • reduced in size in the adult thymus   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
      • medullary volume is about 50% that found in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte migration
    • single positive T cells fail to localize to the medulla of the thymus in newborns   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
    • single positive T cells are retained in the cortex of the thymus   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
  • abnormal thymus cortex morphology
    • single positive thymocytes are retained by the cortex rather than migrating to the medulla   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
  • abnormal thymus medulla morphology
    • reduced in size in the adult thymus   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
    • medullary volume is about 50% that found in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte migration
    • single positive T cells fail to localize to the medulla of the thymus in newborns   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
    • single positive T cells are retained in the cortex of the thymus   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • abnormal thymus cortex morphology
    • single positive thymocytes are retained by the cortex rather than migrating to the medulla   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
  • abnormal thymus medulla morphology
    • reduced in size in the adult thymus   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
    • medullary volume is about 50% that found in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:93960)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Cancer Research
Toxicology
      xenograft/transplant host

Cardiovascular Research
Vascular Defects
      defective leukocyte function

Developmental Biology Research
Internal/Organ Defects
      Lymphoid Tissue Defects
Lymphoid Tissue Defects

Hematological Research
Immunological Defects

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
CD Antigens, Antigen Receptors, and Histocompatibility Markers
      genes regulating susceptibility to infectious disease and endotoxin
Graft vs. Host Disease
Growth Factors/Receptors/Cytokines
Immunodeficiency
      T cell deficiency
      multiple immune defects
      specific T cell deficiency
Lymphoid Tissue Defects
      Lymphocyte Homing
      selective lymph node development defects

Internal/Organ Research
Lymphoid Tissue Defects
      T cell deficiency

Research Tools
Cancer Research
      T cell deficiency
      specific T cell deficiency
      xenograft/transplant host
Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
      T cell deficiency
      T cell deficiency, xenograft/transplant host
      genes regulating susceptibility to infectious disease and endotoxin
      specific T cell deficiency

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol plt
Allele Name paucity of lymph node T-cells
Allele Type Spontaneous
Mutation Made By Hideki Nakano,   NIEHS/NIH
Strain of OriginDDD/1
Gene Symbol and Name plt, paucity of lymph node T cells
Chromosome 4
Molecular Note This mutation is a deletion region on chromosome 4 which includes the Ccl19 and Ccl21b genes (see also revised nomenclature for the Ccl21 family of genes). [MGI Ref ID J:58157] [MGI Ref ID J:65808] [MGI Ref ID J:66381] [MGI Ref ID J:93716]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

plt/Nkno, Separated PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Gunn MD; Kyuwa S; Tam C; Kakiuchi T; Matsuzawa A; Williams LT ; Nakano H. 1999. Mice lacking expression of secondary lymphoid organ chemokine have defects in lymphocyte homing and dendritic cell localization [see comments] J Exp Med 189(3):451-60. [PubMed: 9927507]  [MGI Ref ID J:52567]

Junt T; Nakano H; Dumrese T; Kakiuchi T; Odermatt B; Zinkernagel RM; Hengartner H; Ludewig B. 2002. Antiviral immune responses in the absence of organized lymphoid T cell zones in plt/plt mice. J Immunol 168(12):6032-40. [PubMed: 12055211]  [MGI Ref ID J:76943]

Luther SA; Tang HL; Hyman PL; Farr AG; Cyster JG. 2000. Coexpression of the chemokines ELC and SLC by T zone stromal cells and deletion of the ELC gene in the plt/plt mouse Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97(23):12694-9. [PubMed: 11070085]  [MGI Ref ID J:65808]

Nakano H; Gunn MD. 2001. Gene duplications at the chemokine locus on mouse chromosome 4: multiple strain-specific haplotypes and the deletion of secondary lymphoid-organ chemokine and EBI-1 ligand chemokine genes in the plt mutation J Immunol 166(1):361-9. [PubMed: 11123313]  [MGI Ref ID J:66381]

Nakano H; Mori S; Yonekawa H; Nariuchi H; Matsuzawa A; Kakiuchi T. 1998. A novel mutant gene involved in T-lymphocyte-specific homing into peripheral lymphoid organs on mouse chromosome 4. Blood 91(8):2886-95. [PubMed: 9531599]  [MGI Ref ID J:47460]

Nakano H; Tamura T; Yoshimoto T; Yagita H; Miyasaka M; Butcher EC; Nariuchi H; Kakiuchi T; Matsuzawa A. 1997. Genetic defect in T lymphocyte-specific homing into peripheral lymph nodes. Eur J Immunol 27(1):215-21. [PubMed: 9022021]  [MGI Ref ID J:47819]

Ueno T; Saito F; Gray DH; Kuse S; Hieshima K; Nakano H; Kakiuchi T; Lipp M; Boyd RL; Takahama Y. 2004. CCR7 signals are essential for cortex-medulla migration of developing thymocytes. J Exp Med 200(4):493-505. [PubMed: 15302902]  [MGI Ref ID J:93960]

Vassileva G; Soto H; Zlotnik A; Nakano H; Kakiuchi T; Hedrick JA; Lira SA. 1999. The reduced expression of 6Ckine in the plt mouse results from the deletion of one of two 6Ckine genes. J Exp Med 190(8):1183-8. [PubMed: 10523616]  [MGI Ref ID J:58157]

Wang L; Han R; Lee I; Hancock AS; Xiong G; Gunn MD; Hancock WW. 2005. Permanent survival of fully MHC-mismatched islet allografts by targeting a single chemokine receptor pathway. J Immunol 175(10):6311-8. [PubMed: 16272282]  [MGI Ref ID J:119345]

Additional References

plt related

Asperti-Boursin F; Real E; Bismuth G; Trautmann A; Donnadieu E. 2007. CCR7 ligands control basal T cell motility within lymph node slices in a phosphoinositide 3-kinase-independent manner. J Exp Med 204(5):1167-79. [PubMed: 17485513]  [MGI Ref ID J:125717]

Ato M; Maroof A; Zubairi S; Nakano H; Kakiuchi T; Kaye PM. 2006. Loss of dendritic cell migration and impaired resistance to Leishmania donovani infection in mice deficient in CCL19 and CCL21. J Immunol 176(9):5486-93. [PubMed: 16622017]  [MGI Ref ID J:131653]

Ato M; Nakano H; Kakiuchi T; Kaye PM. 2004. Localization of marginal zone macrophages is regulated by C-C chemokine ligands 21/19. J Immunol 173(8):4815-20. [PubMed: 15470021]  [MGI Ref ID J:93716]

Biber K; Tsuda M; Tozaki-Saitoh H; Tsukamoto K; Toyomitsu E; Masuda T; Boddeke H; Inoue K. 2011. Neuronal CCL21 up-regulates microglia P2X4 expression and initiates neuropathic pain development. EMBO J 30(9):1864-73. [PubMed: 21441897]  [MGI Ref ID J:171987]

Britschgi MR; Favre S; Luther SA. 2010. CCL21 is sufficient to mediate DC migration, maturation and function in the absence of CCL19. Eur J Immunol 40(5):1266-71. [PubMed: 20201039]  [MGI Ref ID J:160954]

Buonamici S; Trimarchi T; Ruocco MG; Reavie L; Cathelin S; Mar BG; Klinakis A; Lukyanov Y; Tseng JC; Sen F; Gehrie E; Li M; Newcomb E; Zavadil J; Meruelo D; Lipp M; Ibrahim S; Efstratiadis A; Zagzag D; Bromberg JS; Dustin ML; Aifantis I. 2009. CCR7 signalling as an essential regulator of CNS infiltration in T-cell leukaemia. Nature 459(7249):1000-4. [PubMed: 19536265]  [MGI Ref ID J:197167]

Chai Q; Onder L; Scandella E; Gil-Cruz C; Perez-Shibayama C; Cupovic J; Danuser R; Sparwasser T; Luther SA; Thiel V; Rulicke T; Stein JV; Hehlgans T; Ludewig B. 2013. Maturation of lymph node fibroblastic reticular cells from myofibroblastic precursors is critical for antiviral immunity. Immunity 38(5):1013-24. [PubMed: 23623380]  [MGI Ref ID J:203158]

Coelho FM; Natale D; Soriano SF; Hons M; Swoger J; Mayer J; Danuser R; Scandella E; Pieczyk M; Zerwes HG; Junt T; Sailer AW; Ludewig B; Sharpe J; Figge MT; Stein JV. 2013. Naive B-cell trafficking is shaped by local chemokine availability and LFA-1-independent stromal interactions. Blood 121(20):4101-9. [PubMed: 23558016]  [MGI Ref ID J:198194]

Colvin BL; Wang Z; Nakano H; Wu W; Kakiuchi T; Fairchild RL; Thomson AW. 2005. CXCL9 antagonism further extends prolonged cardiac allograft survival in CCL19/CCL21-deficient mice. Am J Transplant 5(9):2104-13. [PubMed: 16095489]  [MGI Ref ID J:133225]

Fukuyama S; Nagatake T; Kim DY; Takamura K; Park EJ; Kaisho T; Tanaka N; Kurono Y; Kiyono H. 2006. Cutting edge: Uniqueness of lymphoid chemokine requirement for the initiation and maturation of nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue organogenesis. J Immunol 177(7):4276-80. [PubMed: 16982861]  [MGI Ref ID J:139331]

Greter M; Hofmann J; Becher B. 2009. Neo-lymphoid aggregates in the adult liver can initiate potent cell-mediated immunity. PLoS Biol 7(5):e1000109. [PubMed: 19468301]  [MGI Ref ID J:150671]

Jakubzick C; Tacke F; Llodra J; van Rooijen N; Randolph GJ. 2006. Modulation of dendritic cell trafficking to and from the airways. J Immunol 176(6):3578-84. [PubMed: 16517726]  [MGI Ref ID J:129506]

Jalili A; Pashenkov M; Kriehuber E; Wagner C; Nakano H; Stingl G; Wagner SN. 2010. Induction of targeted cell migration by cutaneous administration of a DNA vector encoding a biologically active chemokine CCL21. J Invest Dermatol 130(6):1611-23. [PubMed: 20182442]  [MGI Ref ID J:160093]

Jang MH; Sougawa N; Tanaka T; Hirata T; Hiroi T; Tohya K; Guo Z; Umemoto E; Ebisuno Y; Yang BG; Seoh JY; Lipp M; Kiyono H; Miyasaka M. 2006. CCR7 is critically important for migration of dendritic cells in intestinal lamina propria to mesenteric lymph nodes. J Immunol 176(2):803-10. [PubMed: 16393963]  [MGI Ref ID J:126598]

Kabashima K; Banks TA; Ansel KM; Lu TT; Ware CF; Cyster JG. 2005. Intrinsic lymphotoxin-beta receptor requirement for homeostasis of lymphoid tissue dendritic cells. Immunity 22(4):439-50. [PubMed: 15845449]  [MGI Ref ID J:97986]

Kelly LM; Pereira JP; Yi T; Xu Y; Cyster JG. 2011. EBI2 guides serial movements of activated B cells and ligand activity is detectable in lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues. J Immunol 187(6):3026-32. [PubMed: 21844396]  [MGI Ref ID J:179238]

Khader SA; Rangel-Moreno J; Fountain JJ; Martino CA; Reiley WW; Pearl JE; Winslow GM; Woodland DL; Randall TD; Cooper AM. 2009. In a murine tuberculosis model, the absence of homeostatic chemokines delays granuloma formation and protective immunity. J Immunol 183(12):8004-14. [PubMed: 19933855]  [MGI Ref ID J:157487]

Kurobe H; Liu C; Ueno T; Saito F; Ohigashi I; Seach N; Arakaki R; Hayashi Y; Kitagawa T; Lipp M; Boyd RL; Takahama Y. 2006. CCR7-dependent cortex-to-medulla migration of positively selected thymocytes is essential for establishing central tolerance. Immunity 24(2):165-77. [PubMed: 16473829]  [MGI Ref ID J:110910]

Kuwabara T; Ishikawa F; Yasuda T; Aritomi K; Nakano H; Tanaka Y; Okada Y; Lipp M; Kakiuchi T. 2009. CCR 7 ligands are required for development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through generating IL-23-dependent Th17 cells. J Immunol 183(4):2513-21. [PubMed: 19625643]  [MGI Ref ID J:151791]

Kuwabara T; Tanaka Y; Ishikawa F; Kondo M; Sekiya H; Kakiuchi T. 2012. CCR7 ligands up-regulate IL-23 through PI3-kinase and NF-kappaB pathway in dendritic cells. J Leukoc Biol 92(2):309-18. [PubMed: 22591694]  [MGI Ref ID J:186174]

Lambe T; Crawford G; Johnson AL; Crockford TL; Bouriez-Jones T; Smyth AM; Pham TH; Zhang Q; Freeman AF; Cyster JG; Su HC; Cornall RJ. 2011. DOCK8 is essential for T-cell survival and the maintenance of CD8+ T-cell memory. Eur J Immunol 41(12):3423-35. [PubMed: 21969276]  [MGI Ref ID J:179651]

Lei Y; Ripen AM; Ishimaru N; Ohigashi I; Nagasawa T; Jeker LT; Bosl MR; Hollander GA; Hayashi Y; Malefyt Rde W; Nitta T; Takahama Y. 2011. Aire-dependent production of XCL1 mediates medullary accumulation of thymic dendritic cells and contributes to regulatory T cell development. J Exp Med 208(2):383-94. [PubMed: 21300913]  [MGI Ref ID J:176844]

Levavasseur E; Metharom P; Dorban G; Nakano H; Kakiuchi T; Carnaud C; Sarradin P; Aucouturier P. 2007. Experimental scrapie in 'plt' mice: an assessment of the role of dendritic-cell migration in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. J Gen Virol 88(Pt 8):2353-60. [PubMed: 17622642]  [MGI Ref ID J:148568]

Link A; Vogt TK; Favre S; Britschgi MR; Acha-Orbea H; Hinz B; Cyster JG; Luther SA. 2007. Fibroblastic reticular cells in lymph nodes regulate the homeostasis of naive T cells. Nat Immunol 8(11):1255-65. [PubMed: 17893676]  [MGI Ref ID J:126345]

Liu C; Ueno T; Kuse S; Saito F; Nitta T; Piali L; Nakano H; Kakiuchi T; Lipp M; Hollander GA; Takahama Y. 2005. The role of CCL21 in recruitment of T-precursor cells to fetal thymi. Blood 105(1):31-9. [PubMed: 15358618]  [MGI Ref ID J:96376]

Lkhagvasuren E; Sakata M; Ohigashi I; Takahama Y. 2013. Lymphotoxin beta receptor regulates the development of CCL21-expressing subset of postnatal medullary thymic epithelial cells. J Immunol 190(10):5110-7. [PubMed: 23585674]  [MGI Ref ID J:202564]

Luther SA; Ansel KM; Cyster JG. 2003. Overlapping roles of CXCL13, interleukin 7 receptor alpha, and CCR7 ligands in lymph node development. J Exp Med 197(9):1191-8. [PubMed: 12732660]  [MGI Ref ID J:83288]

McCaughtry TM; Baldwin TA; Wilken MS; Hogquist KA. 2008. Clonal deletion of thymocytes can occur in the cortex with no involvement of the medulla. J Exp Med 205(11):2575-84. [PubMed: 18936237]  [MGI Ref ID J:140650]

Misslitz A; Pabst O; Hintzen G; Ohl L; Kremmer E; Petrie HT; Forster R. 2004. Thymic T cell development and progenitor localization depend on CCR7. J Exp Med 200(4):481-91. [PubMed: 15302903]  [MGI Ref ID J:93936]

Mori S; Nakano H; Aritomi K; Wang CR; Gunn MD; Kakiuchi T. 2001. Mice lacking expression of the chemokines ccl21-ser and ccl19 (plt mice) demonstrate delayed but enhanced t cell immune responses. J Exp Med 193(2):207-18. [PubMed: 11148224]  [MGI Ref ID J:67594]

Moschovakis GL; Bubke A; Dittrich-Breiholz O; Braun A; Prinz I; Kremmer E; Forster R. 2012. Deficient CCR7 signaling promotes T(H) 2 polarization and B-cell activation in vivo. Eur J Immunol 42(1):48-57. [PubMed: 21969271]  [MGI Ref ID J:179834]

Nagatake T; Fukuyama S; Kim DY; Goda K; Igarashi O; Sato S; Nochi T; Sagara H; Yokota Y; Jetten AM; Kaisho T; Akira S; Mimuro H; Sasakawa C; Fukui Y; Fujihashi K; Akiyama T; Inoue J; Penninger JM; Kunisawa J; Kiyono H. 2009. Id2-, RORgammat-, and LTbetaR-independent initiation of lymphoid organogenesis in ocular immunity. J Exp Med 206(11):2351-64. [PubMed: 19822644]  [MGI Ref ID J:154064]

Nakano H; Yoshimoto T; Kakiuchi T; Matsuzawa A. 1993. Nonspecific augmentation of lymph node T cells and I-E-independent selective deletion of V beta 14+ T cells by Mtv-2 in the DDD mouse. Eur J Immunol 23(10):2434-9. [PubMed: 8405042]  [MGI Ref ID J:15290]

Nakasaki T; Tanaka T; Okudaira S; Hirosawa M; Umemoto E; Otani K; Jin S; Bai Z; Hayasaka H; Fukui Y; Aozasa K; Fujita N; Tsuruo T; Ozono K; Aoki J; Miyasaka M. 2008. Involvement of the lysophosphatidic acid-generating enzyme autotaxin in lymphocyte-endothelial cell interactions. Am J Pathol 173(5):1566-76. [PubMed: 18818380]  [MGI Ref ID J:143348]

Nitta T; Nitta S; Lei Y; Lipp M; Takahama Y. 2009. CCR7-mediated migration of developing thymocytes to the medulla is essential for negative selection to tissue-restricted antigens. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106(40):17129-33. [PubMed: 19805112]  [MGI Ref ID J:153692]

Obata T; Shibata N; Goto Y; Ishikawa I; Sato S; Kunisawa J; Kiyono H. 2013. Critical role of dendritic cells in T cell retention in the interfollicular region of Peyer's patches. J Immunol 191(2):942-8. [PubMed: 23772027]  [MGI Ref ID J:204815]

Okada T; Cyster JG. 2007. CC chemokine receptor 7 contributes to Gi-dependent T cell motility in the lymph node. J Immunol 178(5):2973-8. [PubMed: 17312142]  [MGI Ref ID J:144103]

Okada T; Miller MJ; Parker I; Krummel MF; Neighbors M; Hartley SB; O'Garra A; Cahalan MD; Cyster JG. 2005. Antigen-engaged B cells undergo chemotaxis toward the T zone and form motile conjugates with helper T cells. PLoS Biol 3(6):e150. [PubMed: 15857154]  [MGI Ref ID J:99611]

Okada T; Ngo VN; Ekland EH; Forster R; Lipp M; Littman DR; Cyster JG. 2002. Chemokine requirements for B cell entry to lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. J Exp Med 196(1):65-75. [PubMed: 12093871]  [MGI Ref ID J:77506]

Pabst O; Herbrand H; Friedrichsen M; Velaga S; Dorsch M; Berhardt G; Worbs T; Macpherson AJ; Forster R. 2006. Adaptation of solitary intestinal lymphoid tissue in response to microbiota and chemokine receptor CCR7 signaling. J Immunol 177(10):6824-32. [PubMed: 17082596]  [MGI Ref ID J:140490]

Qu C; Edwards EW; Tacke F; Angeli V; Llodra J; Sanchez-Schmitz G; Garin A; Haque NS; Peters W; van Rooijen N; Sanchez-Torres C; Bromberg J; Charo IF; Jung S; Lira SA; Randolph GJ. 2004. Role of CCR8 and other chemokine pathways in the migration of monocyte-derived dendritic cells to lymph nodes. J Exp Med 200(10):1231-41. [PubMed: 15534368]  [MGI Ref ID J:94536]

Rangel-Moreno J; Moyron-Quiroz J; Kusser K; Hartson L; Nakano H; Randall TD. 2005. Role of CXC chemokine ligand 13, CC chemokine ligand (CCL) 19, and CCL21 in the organization and function of nasal-associated lymphoid tissue. J Immunol 175(8):4904-13. [PubMed: 16210592]  [MGI Ref ID J:119053]

Rangel-Moreno J; Moyron-Quiroz JE; Carragher DM; Kusser K; Hartson L; Moquin A; Randall TD. 2009. Omental milky spots develop in the absence of lymphoid tissue-inducer cells and support B and T cell responses to peritoneal antigens. Immunity 30(5):731-43. [PubMed: 19427241]  [MGI Ref ID J:149548]

Rangel-Moreno J; Moyron-Quiroz JE; Hartson L; Kusser K; Randall TD. 2007. Pulmonary expression of CXC chemokine ligand 13, CC chemokine ligand 19, and CC chemokine ligand 21 is essential for local immunity to influenza. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104(25):10577-82. [PubMed: 17563386]  [MGI Ref ID J:143828]

Schumann K; Lammermann T; Bruckner M; Legler DF; Polleux J; Spatz JP; Schuler G; Forster R; Lutz MB; Sorokin L; Sixt M. 2010. Immobilized chemokine fields and soluble chemokine gradients cooperatively shape migration patterns of dendritic cells. Immunity 32(5):703-13. [PubMed: 20471289]  [MGI Ref ID J:160695]

Scimone ML; Felbinger TW; Mazo IB; Stein JV; Von Andrian UH; Weninger W. 2004. CXCL12 mediates CCR7-independent homing of central memory cells, but not naive T cells, in peripheral lymph nodes. J Exp Med 199(8):1113-20. [PubMed: 15096537]  [MGI Ref ID J:120190]

Stein JV; Rot A; Luo Y; Narasimhaswamy M; Nakano H; Gunn MD; Matsuzawa A; Quackenbush EJ; Dorf ME; von Andrian UH. 2000. The CC chemokine thymus-derived chemotactic agent 4 (TCA-4, secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine, 6Ckine, exodus-2) triggers lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1-mediated arrest of rolling T lymphocytes in peripheral lymph node high endothelial venules. J Exp Med 191(1):61-76. [PubMed: 10620605]  [MGI Ref ID J:112425]

Takamura K; Fukuyama S; Nagatake T; Kim DY; Kawamura A; Kawauchi H; Kiyono H. 2007. Regulatory role of lymphoid chemokine CCL19 and CCL21 in the control of allergic rhinitis. J Immunol 179(9):5897-906. [PubMed: 17947663]  [MGI Ref ID J:153005]

Umemoto E; Otani K; Ikeno T; Verjan Garcia N; Hayasaka H; Bai Z; Jang MH; Tanaka T; Nagasawa T; Ueda K; Miyasaka M. 2012. Constitutive plasmacytoid dendritic cell migration to the splenic white pulp is cooperatively regulated by CCR7- and CXCR4-mediated signaling. J Immunol 189(1):191-9. [PubMed: 22634622]  [MGI Ref ID J:188949]

Wang YG; Kim KD; Wang J; Yu P; Fu YX. 2005. Stimulating lymphotoxin beta receptor on the dendritic cells is critical for their homeostasis and expansion. J Immunol 175(10):6997-7002. [PubMed: 16272360]  [MGI Ref ID J:119688]

Wolf AJ; Linas B; Trevejo-Nunez GJ; Kincaid E; Tamura T; Takatsu K; Ernst JD. 2007. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infects dendritic cells with high frequency and impairs their function in vivo. J Immunol 179(4):2509-19. [PubMed: 17675513]  [MGI Ref ID J:151288]

Worbs T; Mempel TR; Bolter J; von Andrian UH; Forster R. 2007. CCR7 ligands stimulate the intranodal motility of T lymphocytes in vivo. J Exp Med 204(3):489-95. [PubMed: 17325198]  [MGI Ref ID J:125363]

Xu B; Aoyama K; Kusumoto M; Matsuzawa A; Butcher EC; Michie SA; Matsuyama T; Takeuchi T. 2007. Lack of lymphoid chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 enhances allergic airway inflammation in mice. Int Immunol 19(6):775-84. [PubMed: 17513879]  [MGI Ref ID J:122292]

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Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryWhen maintaining a live colony, homozygous mice may be bred together.
Mating SystemHomozygote x Homozygote         (Female x Male)   10-JAN-12
Diet Information LabDiet® 5K52/5K67

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $199.90Female or MaleHomozygous for plt  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$399.80Homozygous for plt x Homozygous for plt  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $259.90Female or MaleHomozygous for plt  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$519.80Homozygous for plt x Homozygous for plt  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

Control Information

  Control
   001026 BALB/cByJ (approximate)
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

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Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
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JAX® Mice
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Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


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General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

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phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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