Strain Name:

B6.129S2(Cg)-Fut7tm1Jbl Fut4tm1Jbl/J

Stock Number:

013152

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Availability:

Cryopreserved - Ready for recovery

Use Restrictions Apply, see Terms of Use
In this strain the catalytic domains of the fucosyltransferase 4 (Fut4) gene and the fucosyltransferase 7 (Fut7) gene were replaced with neomycin resistance (neo) cassettes, abolishing gene function. These mice may be useful for studying leukocyte recruitment and lymphocyte homing.

Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Specieslaboratory mouse
GenerationN11pN1
Generation Definitions

Description
In this strain the catalytic domains of the fucosyltransferase 4 (Fut4) gene and the fucosyltransferase 7 (Fut7) gene were replaced with neomycin resistance (neo) cassettes, abolishing gene function. Mice homozygous for both alleles are viable, fertile, and normal in size. These mice lack inflammation-dependent leukocyte recruitment; specifically neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes, T cells and dendritic cells are unable to migrate to extravascular sites of acute and chronic inflammation. The peripheral nodes in these mice do not support normal B lymphocyte or naive T lymphocyte homing. FucTIV-null defects in leukocyte E- and P-selectin counterreceptor activity and HEV-born L-selectin ligand activity are reversed in the double null mutant mice. Neutrophils in the doubly null mice, unlike FucT-7VII null leukocytes, are virtually devoid of E- and P-selectin ligand activities. These mice also exhibit extreme leukocytosis characterized by decreased neutrophil turnover and increased neutrophil production. These mice may be useful for studying leukocyte recruitment and lymphocyte homing.

Development
A targeting vector was designed to replace the catalytic domain of the fucosyltransferase 4 (Fut4) gene with a neomycin resistance (neo) cassette. The construct was electroporated into 129S2/SvPas-derived D3 embryonic stem (ES) cells. Correctly targeted ES cells were injected into C57BL/6J blastocysts and the resulting chimeric males were bred to (C57BL/6J x DBA/2J)F1 females. These mice were intercrossed and subsequently backcrossed to C57BL/6J for at least 12 generations to create a colony of FucTIV(-/-) mice.

A targeting vector was designed to replace the catalytic domain of the fucosyltransferase 7 (Fut7) gene with a neomycin resistance (neo) cassette. The construct was electroporated into 129S2/SvPas-derived D3 embryonic stem (ES) cells. Correctly targeted ES cells were injected into C57BL/6J blastocysts and the resulting chimeric males were bred to (C57BL/6J x DBA/2J)F1 females. These mice were intercrossed and subsequently backcrossed to C57BL/6J for at least 12 generations to create a colony of FucTVII(-/-) mice.

FucTIV and FucTVII mice were bred together to generate a mouse strain that is homozygous for both alleles (FucTIV(-/-)/FucTVII(-/-)). Upon arrival at The Jackson Laboratory, mice were bred to C57BL/6J (Stock No. 000664) for at least one generation to establish the colony.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J (approximate)
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Fut4tm1Jbl/Fut4tm1Jbl Fut7tm1Jbl/Fut7tm1Jbl

        B6.129S2-Fut7tm1Jbl Fut4tm1Jbl
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal immune system organ morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
    • abnormal lymph node primary follicle morphology
      • small and infrequent but lymph node architecture is otherwise normal   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
    • small lymph nodes
      • peripheral lymph nodes are small   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
      • lymph node hypoplasia
        • 95% reduction of cellularity in peripheral lymph nodes   (MGI Ref ID J:79388)
        • reduced lymphocyte content   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
  • abnormal leukocyte physiology   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
    • abnormal leukocyte migration
      • reduced lymphocyte homing to peripheral and mesenteric lymph nodes   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
      • migration to Peyer's patches unaffected   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
      • abnormal leukocyte tethering or rolling
        • total absence   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
    • abnormal neutrophil physiology
      • remain in circulation for an extremely long period of time   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
      • unable to bind E- or P-selectins   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
      • absent recruitment to the dermis in inflammation   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
  • decreased susceptibility to bacterial infection
    • binding of A. phagocytophilum to neutrophils is severely reduced compared to in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:115682)
    • chemokine secretion induced by infection with A. phagocytophilum is reduced compared to in wild-type and Selplgtm1Rpmc neutrophils   (MGI Ref ID J:115682)
  • decreased susceptibility to type IV hypersensitivity reaction
    • no hypersensitive response   (MGI Ref ID J:79388)
  • increased leukocyte cell number
    • 2.9 fold increase in circulating leukocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
    • increased neutrophil cell number
      • 18 fold increase in neutrophiles   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
      • increased production of neurophiles   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte physiology   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
    • abnormal leukocyte migration
      • reduced lymphocyte homing to peripheral and mesenteric lymph nodes   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
      • migration to Peyer's patches unaffected   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
      • abnormal leukocyte tethering or rolling
        • total absence   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
    • abnormal neutrophil physiology
      • remain in circulation for an extremely long period of time   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
      • unable to bind E- or P-selectins   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
      • absent recruitment to the dermis in inflammation   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
  • increased leukocyte cell number
    • 2.9 fold increase in circulating leukocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
    • increased neutrophil cell number
      • 18 fold increase in neutrophiles   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
      • increased production of neurophiles   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte migration
    • reduced lymphocyte homing to peripheral and mesenteric lymph nodes   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
    • migration to Peyer's patches unaffected   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
    • abnormal leukocyte tethering or rolling
      • total absence   (MGI Ref ID J:79397)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Hematological Research
Immunological Defects

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
Autoimmunity
      B and T cell deficiency
Inflammation
      Neutrophil defects
Lymphoid Tissue Defects
      B and T cell deficiency
      Lymphocyte Homing

Internal/Organ Research
Lymphoid Tissue Defects
      B and T cell deficiency

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Fut4tm1Jbl
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, John Lowe
Allele Type Targeted (knock-out)
Common Name(s) FucT-IV-;
Strain of Origin129S2/SvPas
Gene Symbol and Name Fut4, fucosyltransferase 4
Chromosome 9
Gene Common Name(s) 3-fucosyl-N-acetyl-lactosamine epitope; AI451562; CD15; ELFT; FAL; FCT3A; FUC-TIV; FUTIV; FucT-IV; LeX; SSEA-1; Ssea1; expressed sequence AI451562;
Molecular Note 436 bp of genomic sequence encoding the catalytic domain was replaced with a neomycin selection cassette. [MGI Ref ID J:79397]
 
Allele Symbol Fut7tm1Jbl
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, John Lowe
Allele Type Targeted (knock-out)
Common Name(s) FucT-VII (-);
Strain of Origin129S2/SvPas
Gene Symbol and Name Fut7, fucosyltransferase 7
Chromosome 2
Gene Common Name(s) AI853193; FTVII; Fuc-TVII; FucT-VII; expressed sequence AI853193;
Molecular Note Sequence encoding the catalytic domain was disrupted by the insertion of a PGK-neo cassette. [MGI Ref ID J:35023]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Fut4tm1Jbl alternate2,

Separated MCA


Fut7tm1Jbl, Standard PCR
Fut4tm1Jbl-alternate2, Separated PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Homeister JW; Thall AD; Petryniak B; Maly P; Rogers CE; Smith PL; Kelly RJ; Gersten KM; Askari SW; Cheng G; Smithson G; Marks RM; Misra AK; Hindsgaul O; von Andrian UH; Lowe JB. 2001. The alpha(1,3)fucosyltransferases FucT-IV and FucT-VII exert collaborative control over selectin-dependent leukocyte recruitment and lymphocyte homing. Immunity 15(1):115-26. [PubMed: 11485743]  [MGI Ref ID J:79397]

Additional References

Fut4tm1Jbl related

Arata-Kawai H; Singer MS; Bistrup A; Zante A; Wang YQ; Ito Y; Bao X; Hemmerich S; Fukuda M; Rosen SD. 2011. Functional contributions of N- and O-glycans to L-selectin ligands in murine and human lymphoid organs. Am J Pathol 178(1):423-33. [PubMed: 21224079]  [MGI Ref ID J:168076]

Burne MJ; Rabb H. 2002. Pathophysiological contributions of fucosyltransferases in renal ischemia reperfusion injury. J Immunol 169(5):2648-52. [PubMed: 12193737]  [MGI Ref ID J:120686]

Cai YH; Alvarez A; Alcaide P; Duramad P; Lim YC; Jarolim P; Lowe JB; Luscinskas FW; Lichtman AH. 2006. Abrogation of functional selectin-ligand expression reduces migration of pathogenic CD8+ T cells into heart. J Immunol 176(11):6568-75. [PubMed: 16709814]  [MGI Ref ID J:131772]

Carlyon JA; Akkoyunlu M; Xia L; Yago T; Wang T; Cummings RD; McEver RP; Fikrig E. 2003. Murine neutrophils require alpha1,3-fucosylation but not PSGL-1 for productive infection with Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Blood 102(9):3387-95. [PubMed: 12869507]  [MGI Ref ID J:115682]

Chen S; Kawashima H; Lowe JB; Lanier LL; Fukuda M. 2005. Suppression of tumor formation in lymph nodes by L-selectin-mediated natural killer cell recruitment. J Exp Med 202(12):1679-89. [PubMed: 16352740]  [MGI Ref ID J:118830]

Doebis C; Siegmund K; Loddenkemper C; Lowe JB; Issekutz AC; Hamann A; Huehn J; Syrbe U. 2008. Cellular players and role of selectin ligands in leukocyte recruitment in a T-cell-initiated delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction. Am J Pathol 173(4):1067-76. [PubMed: 18755847]  [MGI Ref ID J:139671]

Ehlers S; Schreiber T; Dunzendorfer A; Lowe JB; Holscher C. 2009. Fucosyltransferase IV and VII-directed selectin ligand function determines long-term survival in experimental tuberculosis. Immunobiology 214(8):674-82. [PubMed: 19608009]  [MGI Ref ID J:156560]

Eom HS; Rubio MT; Means TK; Luster AD; Sykes M. 2005. T-cell P/E-selectin ligand alpha(1,3)fucosylation is not required for graft-vs-host disease induction. Exp Hematol 33(12):1564-73. [PubMed: 16338500]  [MGI Ref ID J:104649]

Fabene PF; Mora GN; Martinello M; Rossi B; Merigo F; Ottoboni L; Bach S; Angiari S; Benati D; Chakir A; Zanetti L; Schio F; Osculati A; Marzola P; Nicolato E; Homeister JW; Xia L; Lowe JB; McEver RP; Osculati F; Sbarbati A; Butcher EC; Constantin G. 2008. A role for leukocyte-endothelial adhesion mechanisms in epilepsy. Nat Med 14(12):1377-83. [PubMed: 19029985]  [MGI Ref ID J:142251]

Gainers ME; Descheny L; Barthel SR; Liu L; Wurbel MA; Dimitroff CJ. 2007. Skin-homing receptors on effector leukocytes are differentially sensitive to glyco-metabolic antagonism in allergic contact dermatitis. J Immunol 179(12):8509-18. [PubMed: 18056398]  [MGI Ref ID J:155193]

Harp JR; Gilchrist MA; Onami TM. 2010. Memory T cells are enriched in lymph nodes of selectin-ligand-deficient mice. J Immunol 185(10):5751-61. [PubMed: 20937846]  [MGI Ref ID J:165638]

Harp JR; Onami TM. 2010. Naive T cells re-distribute to the lungs of selectin ligand deficient mice. PLoS One 5(6):e10973. [PubMed: 20532047]  [MGI Ref ID J:161814]

Hirakawa J; Tsuboi K; Sato K; Kobayashi M; Watanabe S; Takakura A; Imai Y; Ito Y; Fukuda M; Kawashima H. 2010. Novel anti-carbohydrate antibodies reveal the cooperative function of sulfated N- and O-glycans in lymphocyte homing. J Biol Chem 285(52):40864-78. [PubMed: 20929857]  [MGI Ref ID J:167381]

Hirose M; Matsumura R; Sato K; Murai T; Kawashima H. 2011. Binding of L-selectin to its vascular and extravascular ligands is differentially regulated by pH. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 414(2):437-42. [PubMed: 21982762]  [MGI Ref ID J:179220]

Hoefer IE; van Royen N; Rectenwald JE; Deindl E; Hua J; Jost M; Grundmann S; Voskuil M; Ozaki CK; Piek JJ; Buschmann IR. 2004. Arteriogenesis proceeds via ICAM-1/Mac-1- mediated mechanisms. Circ Res 94(9):1179-85. [PubMed: 15059933]  [MGI Ref ID J:98899]

Homeister JW; Daugherty A; Lowe JB. 2004. Alpha(1,3)fucosyltransferases FucT-IV and FucT-VII control susceptibility to atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-/- mice. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 24(10):1897-903. [PubMed: 15308551]  [MGI Ref ID J:102212]

Hoos A; Protsyuk D; Borsig L. 2014. Metastatic growth progression caused by PSGL-1-mediated recruitment of monocytes to metastatic sites. Cancer Res 74(3):695-704. [PubMed: 24322980]  [MGI Ref ID J:206967]

Jiang X; Campbell JJ; Kupper TS. 2010. Embryonic trafficking of gammadelta T cells to skin is dependent on E/P selectin ligands and CCR4. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107(16):7443-8. [PubMed: 20368416]  [MGI Ref ID J:159289]

Jiang X; Clark RA; Liu L; Wagers AJ; Fuhlbrigge RC; Kupper TS. 2012. Skin infection generates non-migratory memory CD8+ TRM cells providing global skin immunity. Nature 483(7388):227-31. [PubMed: 22388819]  [MGI Ref ID J:181682]

Ledgerwood LG; Lal G; Zhang N; Garin A; Esses SJ; Ginhoux F; Merad M; Peche H; Lira SA; Ding Y; Yang Y; He X; Schuchman EH; Allende ML; Ochando JC; Bromberg JS. 2008. The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 causes tissue retention by inhibiting the entry of peripheral tissue T lymphocytes into afferent lymphatics. Nat Immunol 9(1):42-53. [PubMed: 18037890]  [MGI Ref ID J:130407]

Nacher M; Blazquez AB; Shao B; Matesanz A; Prophete C; Berin MC; Frenette PS; Hidalgo A. 2011. Physiological Contribution of CD44 as a Ligand for E-Selectin during Inflammatory T-Cell Recruitment. Am J Pathol 178(5):2437-46. [PubMed: 21457936]  [MGI Ref ID J:171380]

Piccio L; Rossi B; Colantonio L; Grenningloh R; Gho A; Ottoboni L; Homeister JW; Scarpini E; Martinello M; Laudanna C; D'Ambrosio D; Lowe JB; Constantin G. 2005. Efficient recruitment of lymphocytes in inflamed brain venules requires expression of cutaneous lymphocyte antigen and fucosyltransferase-VII. J Immunol 174(9):5805-13. [PubMed: 15843584]  [MGI Ref ID J:98399]

Saeki K; Satoh T; Yokozeki H. 2013. alpha(1,3) Fucosyltransferases IV and VII Are Essential for the Initial Recruitment of Basophils in Chronic Allergic Inflammation. J Invest Dermatol 133(9):2161-9. [PubMed: 23657464]  [MGI Ref ID J:200021]

Satoh T; Kanai Y; Wu MH; Yokozeki H; Kannagi R; Lowe JB; Nishioka K. 2005. Synthesis of {alpha}(1,3) Fucosyltransferases IV- and VII-Dependent Eosinophil Selectin Ligand and Recruitment to the Skin. Am J Pathol 167(3):787-96. [PubMed: 16127157]  [MGI Ref ID J:100713]

Schreiber T; Ehlers S; Aly S; Holscher A; Hartmann S; Lipp M; Lowe JB; Holscher C. 2006. Selectin ligand-independent priming and maintenance of T cell immunity during airborne tuberculosis. J Immunol 176(2):1131-40. [PubMed: 16394002]  [MGI Ref ID J:126441]

Smithson G; Rogers CE; Smith PL; Scheidegger EP; Petryniak B; Myers JT; Kim DS; Homeister JW; Lowe JB. 2001. Fuc-TVII is required for T helper 1 and T cytotoxic 1 lymphocyte selectin ligand expression and recruitment in inflammation, and together with Fuc-TIV regulates naive T cell trafficking to lymph nodes. J Exp Med 194(5):601-14. [PubMed: 11535629]  [MGI Ref ID J:79388]

Stark FC; Gurnani K; Sad S; Krishnan L. 2012. Lack of functional selectin ligand interactions compromises long term tumor protection by CD8+ T cells. PLoS One 7(2):e32211. [PubMed: 22359671]  [MGI Ref ID J:185219]

Stark MA; Huo Y; Burcin TL; Morris MA; Olson TS; Ley K. 2005. Phagocytosis of Apoptotic Neutrophils Regulates Granulopoiesis via IL-23 and IL-17. Immunity 22(3):285-94. [PubMed: 15780986]  [MGI Ref ID J:97026]

Sultana DA; Zhang SL; Todd SP; Bhandoola A. 2012. Expression of functional P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 on hematopoietic progenitors is developmentally regulated. J Immunol 188(9):4385-93. [PubMed: 22461691]  [MGI Ref ID J:188457]

Suzukawa M; Miller M; Rosenthal P; Cho JY; Doherty TA; Varki A; Broide D. 2013. Sialyltransferase ST3Gal-III regulates Siglec-F ligand formation and eosinophilic lung inflammation in mice. J Immunol 190(12):5939-48. [PubMed: 23677475]  [MGI Ref ID J:204846]

Weninger W; Ulfman LH; Cheng G; Souchkova N; Quackenbush EJ; Lowe JB; von Andrian UH. 2000. Specialized contributions by alpha(1,3)-fucosyltransferase-IV and FucT-VII during leukocyte rolling in dermal microvessels. Immunity 12(6):665-76. [PubMed: 10894166]  [MGI Ref ID J:63091]

Zhang N; Schroppel B; Lal G; Jakubzick C; Mao X; Chen D; Yin N; Jessberger R; Ochando JC; Ding Y; Bromberg JS. 2009. Regulatory T cells sequentially migrate from inflamed tissues to draining lymph nodes to suppress the alloimmune response. Immunity 30(3):458-69. [PubMed: 19303390]  [MGI Ref ID J:147032]

Zhang S; Condac E; Qiu H; Jiang J; Gutierrez-Sanchez G; Bergmann C; Handel T; Wang L. 2012. Heparin-induced leukocytosis requires 6-O-sulfation and is caused by blockade of selectin- and CXCL12 protein-mediated leukocyte trafficking in mice. J Biol Chem 287(8):5542-53. [PubMed: 22194593]  [MGI Ref ID J:182444]

Zhou L; Li LW; Yan Q; Petryniak B; Man Y; Su C; Shim J; Chervin S; Lowe JB. 2008. Notch-dependent control of myelopoiesis is regulated by fucosylation. Blood 112(2):308-19. [PubMed: 18359890]  [MGI Ref ID J:138465]

Fut7tm1Jbl related

Arata-Kawai H; Singer MS; Bistrup A; Zante A; Wang YQ; Ito Y; Bao X; Hemmerich S; Fukuda M; Rosen SD. 2011. Functional contributions of N- and O-glycans to L-selectin ligands in murine and human lymphoid organs. Am J Pathol 178(1):423-33. [PubMed: 21224079]  [MGI Ref ID J:168076]

Burne MJ; Rabb H. 2002. Pathophysiological contributions of fucosyltransferases in renal ischemia reperfusion injury. J Immunol 169(5):2648-52. [PubMed: 12193737]  [MGI Ref ID J:120686]

Cai YH; Alvarez A; Alcaide P; Duramad P; Lim YC; Jarolim P; Lowe JB; Luscinskas FW; Lichtman AH. 2006. Abrogation of functional selectin-ligand expression reduces migration of pathogenic CD8+ T cells into heart. J Immunol 176(11):6568-75. [PubMed: 16709814]  [MGI Ref ID J:131772]

Carlyon JA; Akkoyunlu M; Xia L; Yago T; Wang T; Cummings RD; McEver RP; Fikrig E. 2003. Murine neutrophils require alpha1,3-fucosylation but not PSGL-1 for productive infection with Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Blood 102(9):3387-95. [PubMed: 12869507]  [MGI Ref ID J:115682]

Chen S; Kawashima H; Lowe JB; Lanier LL; Fukuda M. 2005. Suppression of tumor formation in lymph nodes by L-selectin-mediated natural killer cell recruitment. J Exp Med 202(12):1679-89. [PubMed: 16352740]  [MGI Ref ID J:118830]

Doebis C; Siegmund K; Loddenkemper C; Lowe JB; Issekutz AC; Hamann A; Huehn J; Syrbe U. 2008. Cellular players and role of selectin ligands in leukocyte recruitment in a T-cell-initiated delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction. Am J Pathol 173(4):1067-76. [PubMed: 18755847]  [MGI Ref ID J:139671]

Dudda JC; Perdue N; Bachtanian E; Campbell DJ. 2008. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells maintain immune homeostasis in the skin. J Exp Med 205(7):1559-65. [PubMed: 18573908]  [MGI Ref ID J:137389]

Ehlers S; Schreiber T; Dunzendorfer A; Lowe JB; Holscher C. 2009. Fucosyltransferase IV and VII-directed selectin ligand function determines long-term survival in experimental tuberculosis. Immunobiology 214(8):674-82. [PubMed: 19608009]  [MGI Ref ID J:156560]

Eom HS; Rubio MT; Means TK; Luster AD; Sykes M. 2005. T-cell P/E-selectin ligand alpha(1,3)fucosylation is not required for graft-vs-host disease induction. Exp Hematol 33(12):1564-73. [PubMed: 16338500]  [MGI Ref ID J:104649]

Erdmann I; Scheidegger EP; Koch FK; Heinzerling L; Odermatt B; Burg G; Lowe JB; Kundig TM. 2002. Fucosyltransferase VII-deficient mice with defective E-, P-, and L-selectin ligands show impaired CD4+ and CD8+ T cell migration into the skin, but normal extravasation into visceral organs. J Immunol 168(5):2139-46. [PubMed: 11859099]  [MGI Ref ID J:74776]

Fabene PF; Mora GN; Martinello M; Rossi B; Merigo F; Ottoboni L; Bach S; Angiari S; Benati D; Chakir A; Zanetti L; Schio F; Osculati A; Marzola P; Nicolato E; Homeister JW; Xia L; Lowe JB; McEver RP; Osculati F; Sbarbati A; Butcher EC; Constantin G. 2008. A role for leukocyte-endothelial adhesion mechanisms in epilepsy. Nat Med 14(12):1377-83. [PubMed: 19029985]  [MGI Ref ID J:142251]

Gainers ME; Descheny L; Barthel SR; Liu L; Wurbel MA; Dimitroff CJ. 2007. Skin-homing receptors on effector leukocytes are differentially sensitive to glyco-metabolic antagonism in allergic contact dermatitis. J Immunol 179(12):8509-18. [PubMed: 18056398]  [MGI Ref ID J:155193]

Gitlin JM; Homeister JW; Bulgrien J; Counselman J; Curtiss LK; Lowe JB; Boisvert WA. 2009. Disruption of tissue-specific fucosyltransferase VII, an enzyme necessary for selectin ligand synthesis, suppresses atherosclerosis in mice. Am J Pathol 174(1):343-50. [PubMed: 19056851]  [MGI Ref ID J:144237]

Harp JR; Gilchrist MA; Onami TM. 2010. Memory T cells are enriched in lymph nodes of selectin-ligand-deficient mice. J Immunol 185(10):5751-61. [PubMed: 20937846]  [MGI Ref ID J:165638]

Harp JR; Onami TM. 2010. Naive T cells re-distribute to the lungs of selectin ligand deficient mice. PLoS One 5(6):e10973. [PubMed: 20532047]  [MGI Ref ID J:161814]

Hirakawa J; Tsuboi K; Sato K; Kobayashi M; Watanabe S; Takakura A; Imai Y; Ito Y; Fukuda M; Kawashima H. 2010. Novel anti-carbohydrate antibodies reveal the cooperative function of sulfated N- and O-glycans in lymphocyte homing. J Biol Chem 285(52):40864-78. [PubMed: 20929857]  [MGI Ref ID J:167381]

Hirose M; Matsumura R; Sato K; Murai T; Kawashima H. 2011. Binding of L-selectin to its vascular and extravascular ligands is differentially regulated by pH. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 414(2):437-42. [PubMed: 21982762]  [MGI Ref ID J:179220]

Hoefer IE; van Royen N; Rectenwald JE; Deindl E; Hua J; Jost M; Grundmann S; Voskuil M; Ozaki CK; Piek JJ; Buschmann IR. 2004. Arteriogenesis proceeds via ICAM-1/Mac-1- mediated mechanisms. Circ Res 94(9):1179-85. [PubMed: 15059933]  [MGI Ref ID J:98899]

Homeister JW; Daugherty A; Lowe JB. 2004. Alpha(1,3)fucosyltransferases FucT-IV and FucT-VII control susceptibility to atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-/- mice. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 24(10):1897-903. [PubMed: 15308551]  [MGI Ref ID J:102212]

Hoos A; Protsyuk D; Borsig L. 2014. Metastatic growth progression caused by PSGL-1-mediated recruitment of monocytes to metastatic sites. Cancer Res 74(3):695-704. [PubMed: 24322980]  [MGI Ref ID J:206967]

Jiang X; Campbell JJ; Kupper TS. 2010. Embryonic trafficking of gammadelta T cells to skin is dependent on E/P selectin ligands and CCR4. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107(16):7443-8. [PubMed: 20368416]  [MGI Ref ID J:159289]

Jiang X; Clark RA; Liu L; Wagers AJ; Fuhlbrigge RC; Kupper TS. 2012. Skin infection generates non-migratory memory CD8+ TRM cells providing global skin immunity. Nature 483(7388):227-31. [PubMed: 22388819]  [MGI Ref ID J:181682]

Lacha J; Bushell A; Smetana K; Rossmann P; Pribylova P; Wood K; Maly P. 2002. Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and selectin ligands in acute cardiac allograft rejection: a study on gene-deficient mouse models. J Leukoc Biol 71(2):311-8. [PubMed: 11818453]  [MGI Ref ID J:74694]

Laubli H; Stevenson JL; Varki A; Varki NM; Borsig L. 2006. L-selectin facilitation of metastasis involves temporal induction of Fut7-dependent ligands at sites of tumor cell arrest. Cancer Res 66(3):1536-42. [PubMed: 16452210]  [MGI Ref ID J:106671]

Ledgerwood LG; Lal G; Zhang N; Garin A; Esses SJ; Ginhoux F; Merad M; Peche H; Lira SA; Ding Y; Yang Y; He X; Schuchman EH; Allende ML; Ochando JC; Bromberg JS. 2008. The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 causes tissue retention by inhibiting the entry of peripheral tissue T lymphocytes into afferent lymphatics. Nat Immunol 9(1):42-53. [PubMed: 18037890]  [MGI Ref ID J:130407]

Maly P; Thall A; Petryniak B; Rogers CE; Smith PL; Marks RM; Kelly RJ; Gersten KM; Cheng G; Saunders TL; Camper SA; Camphausen RT; Sullivan FX; Isogai Y; Hindsgaul O; von Andrian UH; Lowe JB. 1996. The alpha(1,3)fucosyltransferase Fuc-TVII controls leukocyte trafficking through an essential role in L-, E-, and P-selectin ligand biosynthesis. Cell 86(4):643-53. [PubMed: 8752218]  [MGI Ref ID J:35023]

Nacher M; Blazquez AB; Shao B; Matesanz A; Prophete C; Berin MC; Frenette PS; Hidalgo A. 2011. Physiological Contribution of CD44 as a Ligand for E-Selectin during Inflammatory T-Cell Recruitment. Am J Pathol 178(5):2437-46. [PubMed: 21457936]  [MGI Ref ID J:171380]

Piccio L; Rossi B; Colantonio L; Grenningloh R; Gho A; Ottoboni L; Homeister JW; Scarpini E; Martinello M; Laudanna C; D'Ambrosio D; Lowe JB; Constantin G. 2005. Efficient recruitment of lymphocytes in inflamed brain venules requires expression of cutaneous lymphocyte antigen and fucosyltransferase-VII. J Immunol 174(9):5805-13. [PubMed: 15843584]  [MGI Ref ID J:98399]

Saeki K; Satoh T; Yokozeki H. 2013. alpha(1,3) Fucosyltransferases IV and VII Are Essential for the Initial Recruitment of Basophils in Chronic Allergic Inflammation. J Invest Dermatol 133(9):2161-9. [PubMed: 23657464]  [MGI Ref ID J:200021]

Satoh T; Kanai Y; Wu MH; Yokozeki H; Kannagi R; Lowe JB; Nishioka K. 2005. Synthesis of {alpha}(1,3) Fucosyltransferases IV- and VII-Dependent Eosinophil Selectin Ligand and Recruitment to the Skin. Am J Pathol 167(3):787-96. [PubMed: 16127157]  [MGI Ref ID J:100713]

Schreiber T; Ehlers S; Aly S; Holscher A; Hartmann S; Lipp M; Lowe JB; Holscher C. 2006. Selectin ligand-independent priming and maintenance of T cell immunity during airborne tuberculosis. J Immunol 176(2):1131-40. [PubMed: 16394002]  [MGI Ref ID J:126441]

Siegmund K; Feuerer M; Siewert C; Ghani S; Haubold U; Dankof A; Krenn V; Schon MP; Scheffold A; Lowe JB; Hamann A; Syrbe U; Huehn J. 2005. Migration matters: regulatory T-cell compartmentalization determines suppressive activity in vivo. Blood 106(9):3097-104. [PubMed: 16014565]  [MGI Ref ID J:123903]

Smithson G; Rogers CE; Smith PL; Scheidegger EP; Petryniak B; Myers JT; Kim DS; Homeister JW; Lowe JB. 2001. Fuc-TVII is required for T helper 1 and T cytotoxic 1 lymphocyte selectin ligand expression and recruitment in inflammation, and together with Fuc-TIV regulates naive T cell trafficking to lymph nodes. J Exp Med 194(5):601-14. [PubMed: 11535629]  [MGI Ref ID J:79388]

Stark FC; Gurnani K; Sad S; Krishnan L. 2012. Lack of functional selectin ligand interactions compromises long term tumor protection by CD8+ T cells. PLoS One 7(2):e32211. [PubMed: 22359671]  [MGI Ref ID J:185219]

Stark MA; Huo Y; Burcin TL; Morris MA; Olson TS; Ley K. 2005. Phagocytosis of Apoptotic Neutrophils Regulates Granulopoiesis via IL-23 and IL-17. Immunity 22(3):285-94. [PubMed: 15780986]  [MGI Ref ID J:97026]

Sultana DA; Zhang SL; Todd SP; Bhandoola A. 2012. Expression of functional P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 on hematopoietic progenitors is developmentally regulated. J Immunol 188(9):4385-93. [PubMed: 22461691]  [MGI Ref ID J:188457]

Suzukawa M; Miller M; Rosenthal P; Cho JY; Doherty TA; Varki A; Broide D. 2013. Sialyltransferase ST3Gal-III regulates Siglec-F ligand formation and eosinophilic lung inflammation in mice. J Immunol 190(12):5939-48. [PubMed: 23677475]  [MGI Ref ID J:204846]

Weninger W; Ulfman LH; Cheng G; Souchkova N; Quackenbush EJ; Lowe JB; von Andrian UH. 2000. Specialized contributions by alpha(1,3)-fucosyltransferase-IV and FucT-VII during leukocyte rolling in dermal microvessels. Immunity 12(6):665-76. [PubMed: 10894166]  [MGI Ref ID J:63091]

Zhang N; Schroppel B; Lal G; Jakubzick C; Mao X; Chen D; Yin N; Jessberger R; Ochando JC; Ding Y; Bromberg JS. 2009. Regulatory T cells sequentially migrate from inflamed tissues to draining lymph nodes to suppress the alloimmune response. Immunity 30(3):458-69. [PubMed: 19303390]  [MGI Ref ID J:147032]

Zhang S; Condac E; Qiu H; Jiang J; Gutierrez-Sanchez G; Bergmann C; Handel T; Wang L. 2012. Heparin-induced leukocytosis requires 6-O-sulfation and is caused by blockade of selectin- and CXCL12 protein-mediated leukocyte trafficking in mice. J Biol Chem 287(8):5542-53. [PubMed: 22194593]  [MGI Ref ID J:182444]

Zhou L; Li LW; Yan Q; Petryniak B; Man Y; Su C; Shim J; Chervin S; Lowe JB. 2008. Notch-dependent control of myelopoiesis is regulated by fucosylation. Blood 112(2):308-19. [PubMed: 18359890]  [MGI Ref ID J:138465]

Health & husbandry

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryWhen maintaining a live colony, double homozygous mice may be bred together, double heterozygous mice may be bred to wildtype mice from the colony, or to C57BL/6J inbred mice (Stock No. 000664).

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $2450.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.
    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 11 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice
    Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3185.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.
    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We will fulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 11 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice
    Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J (approximate)
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
Surgical and Preconditioning Services
JAX® Services
Customer Services and Support
Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
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Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


For Licensing and Use Restrictions view the link(s) below:
- Use of MICE by companies or for-profit entities requires a license prior to shipping.

Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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