Strain Name:

C.129S-Batf3tm1Kmm/J

Stock Number:

013756

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Availability:

Repository- Live

Use Restrictions Apply, see Terms of Use
These knock-out mice are lacking exons 1-2 of the Batf3 gene, abolishing gene function. This strain may be useful for studying CD8 deficiency, antigen cross-presentation, and CD8- T cell responses against viral infection and responses to tumor challenge.

Description

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Mating SystemHomozygote x Homozygote         (Female x Male)   02-MAR-11
Specieslaboratory mouse
GenerationN11+N1F6 (29-OCT-13)
Generation Definitions
 
Donating InvestigatorDr. Kenneth Murphy,   Washingston Univ School of Medicine

Description
These Batf3-/- mutant mice are lacking exons 1-2 of the basic leucine zipper transcription factor, ATF-like 3 (Batf3) gene, abolishing gene function. Mice that are homozygous for this allele are viable and fertile. Batf3 is highly expressed in CD11c+ CD8α+ conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), with low to absent expression in other immune cells.The deletion of Batf3 prevents development of splenic CD8α+ cDCs, which are important for cross-presentation during infections. Lymph nodes and thymi of Batf3-/- mice lack CD8α+ DCs, and DCs generated from Batf3-/- bone marrow (BM) and spleens are deficient in Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3-induced interleukin (IL)-12 production. These mice also lack CD103+CD11b- DCs in the lung, intestine, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs), dermis, and skin-draining lymph nodes. Exhibiting defects in CD8+T cell response priming, including lack of virus-specific responses, results in the inability to reject highly immunogenic syngeneic tumors. This strain may be useful for studying CD8 deficiency, antigen cross-presentation, and CD8- T cell responses against viral infection and responses to tumor challenge.

Development
A targeting vector was designed to replace exons 1-2 of the basic leucine zipper transcription factor, ATF-like 3 (Batf3) gene with a loxP-flanked neomycin resistance (neo) cassette. The construct was electroporated into 129S6/SvEvTac-derived MC50 embryonic stem (ES) cells. Correctly targeted ES cells were injected into blastocysts and resulting chimeric males were bred to 129SvEv females to establish a colony. These mice were subsequently bred to BALB/c-Tg(CMV-cre)1Cgn/J mice (Stock No. 003465) to remove the neo cassette. These mice were backcrossed to BALB/c mice for at least 10 generations. Upon arrival at The Jackson Laboratory, mice were bred to BALB/cJ inbred mice (Stock No. 000651) for at least one generation to establish the colony.

Control Information

  Control
   000651 BALB/cJ
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

Strains carrying   Batf3tm1Kmm allele
013596   129S-Batf3tm1Kmm/J
013755   B6.129S(C)-Batf3tm1Kmm/J
View Strains carrying   Batf3tm1Kmm     (2 strains)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Batf3tm1Kmm/Batf3tm1Kmm

        involves: 129S6/SvEvTac * BALB/cJ
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal dendritic cell differentiation
    • mice lack CD8a+ dendritic cell subsets   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • bone marrow chimera experiments indicate a lack of CD8a+ DCs is due to a cell-intrinsic effect of the mutant locus   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • in vitro bone marrow differentiation cultures fail to generate CD24+ Sirp-alpha- DCs that are similar to CD8a+ DC   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
  • abnormal immune system physiology
    • transplanted syngenic fibrosarcomas grow in size instead of being reapidly rejected as happens in control mice   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • abnormal cytotoxic T cell physiology
      • CD8+ T cells from mice infected with West Nile virus (WNV) have defective IFN-gamma secretion when cultured with WNV-peptide   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
      • bone marrow chimera studies demonstrate that defective cytolytic activity is not intrinsic to the CD8+ T cells but rather defective dendritic cell function   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
      • infiltrating CD8+ T cells fail to infiltrate transplanted syngenic tumors   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
      • decreased cytotoxic T cell cytolysis
        • CD8+ T cells from mice infected with West Nile virus (WNV) have defective killing of WNV peptide-loaded target cells   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • abnormal dendritic cell physiology
      • conventional DCs fail to secrete IL-12 after TL3 stimulation but have normal responses to TLR4 and TLR9 stimulation   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
      • abnormal dendritic cell antigen presentation
        • conventional DCs are unable to cross-present (i.e. take up protein, process into peptide and present) ovalbumin antigen to ova-specific CD8+ T cells   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
  • decreased memory T cell number
    • mice fail to develop West Nile Virus (WNV)-specific memory CD8+ T cells after infection with the virus   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • the number of CD8+CD44hiCD62Llowcells memory cells is about half-that of wild-type mice before infection and is five-fold less after infection   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
  • decreased myeloid dendritic cell number
    • mice lack splenic CD11chiCD8a+DEC205+ dendritic cells   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • mice have a loss of CD11chiCD11bdull DCs and CD11chi CD8a+CD24+ DCs   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • mice have normal populations of CD4+ and CD8a-CD4- conventional DC subsets   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • lymph nodes and thymi lack CD8a+ DC subsets   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • CD103-+DEC205+CD8a-CD11blo/- dermal DC numbers are reduced 5-fold in draining lymph nodes of the skin   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal cytotoxic T cell physiology
    • CD8+ T cells from mice infected with West Nile virus (WNV) have defective IFN-gamma secretion when cultured with WNV-peptide   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • bone marrow chimera studies demonstrate that defective cytolytic activity is not intrinsic to the CD8+ T cells but rather defective dendritic cell function   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • infiltrating CD8+ T cells fail to infiltrate transplanted syngenic tumors   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • decreased cytotoxic T cell cytolysis
      • CD8+ T cells from mice infected with West Nile virus (WNV) have defective killing of WNV peptide-loaded target cells   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
  • abnormal dendritic cell differentiation
    • mice lack CD8a+ dendritic cell subsets   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • bone marrow chimera experiments indicate a lack of CD8a+ DCs is due to a cell-intrinsic effect of the mutant locus   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • in vitro bone marrow differentiation cultures fail to generate CD24+ Sirp-alpha- DCs that are similar to CD8a+ DC   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
  • decreased memory T cell number
    • mice fail to develop West Nile Virus (WNV)-specific memory CD8+ T cells after infection with the virus   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • the number of CD8+CD44hiCD62Llowcells memory cells is about half-that of wild-type mice before infection and is five-fold less after infection   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
  • decreased myeloid dendritic cell number
    • mice lack splenic CD11chiCD8a+DEC205+ dendritic cells   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • mice have a loss of CD11chiCD11bdull DCs and CD11chi CD8a+CD24+ DCs   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • mice have normal populations of CD4+ and CD8a-CD4- conventional DC subsets   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • lymph nodes and thymi lack CD8a+ DC subsets   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • CD103-+DEC205+CD8a-CD11blo/- dermal DC numbers are reduced 5-fold in draining lymph nodes of the skin   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal dendritic cell differentiation
    • mice lack CD8a+ dendritic cell subsets   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • bone marrow chimera experiments indicate a lack of CD8a+ DCs is due to a cell-intrinsic effect of the mutant locus   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)
    • in vitro bone marrow differentiation cultures fail to generate CD24+ Sirp-alpha- DCs that are similar to CD8a+ DC   (MGI Ref ID J:141064)

Batf3tm1Kmm/Batf3tm1Kmm

        involves: 129S6/SvEvTac
  • immune system phenotype
  • *normal* immune system phenotype
    • homozygotes retain an enhanced antibody response to anti-Clec9a coupled antigen   (MGI Ref ID J:181366)
    • abnormal cytotoxic T cell physiology
      • reduced cytotoxic T cell response to anti-Clec9a coupled antigen   (MGI Ref ID J:181366)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal cytotoxic T cell physiology
    • reduced cytotoxic T cell response to anti-Clec9a coupled antigen   (MGI Ref ID J:181366)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
CD Antigens, Antigen Receptors, and Histocompatibility Markers
Growth Factors/Receptors/Cytokines
Immunodeficiency
      T cell deficiency
      specific T cell deficiency
Lymphoid Tissue Defects
      B and T cell deficiency

Virology Research
B and T Cell Deficiency

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Batf3tm1Kmm
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Kenneth M Murphy
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Mutation Made ByDr. Kenneth Murphy,   Washingston Univ School of Medicine
Strain of Origin129S6/SvEvTac
Gene Symbol and Name Batf3, basic leucine zipper transcription factor, ATF-like 3
Chromosome 1
Gene Common Name(s) 9130211I03Rik; JDP1; JUNDM1; RIKEN cDNA 9130211I03 gene; SNFT;
Molecular Note Exons 1-2 were replaced by a floxed neomycin cassette. Cre-mediated recombination removed the neo cassette. Gene inactivation was confirmed by a lack of protein detected by immunoblot analysis of Th1 CD4+ T cells. [MGI Ref ID J:141064]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Batf3tm1Kmmalternate2, Standard PCR
Generic Cre Melt Curve Analysis,

Probe


Generic Cre Melt Curve Analysis, Melt Curve Analysis


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Additional References

Batf3tm1Kmm related

Ali OA; Verbeke C; Johnson C; Sands RW; Lewin SA; White D; Doherty E; Dranoff G; Mooney DJ. 2014. Identification of immune factors regulating antitumor immunity using polymeric vaccines with multiple adjuvants. Cancer Res 74(6):1670-81. [PubMed: 24480625]  [MGI Ref ID J:208326]

Arora P; Baena A; Yu KO; Saini NK; Kharkwal SS; Goldberg MF; Kunnath-Velayudhan S; Carreno LJ; Venkataswamy MM; Kim J; Lazar-Molnar E; Lauvau G; Chang YT; Liu Z; Bittman R; Al-Shamkhani A; Cox LR; Jervis PJ; Veerapen N; Besra GS; Porcelli SA. 2014. A single subset of dendritic cells controls the cytokine bias of natural killer T cell responses to diverse glycolipid antigens. Immunity 40(1):105-16. [PubMed: 24412610]  [MGI Ref ID J:209397]

Atibalentja DF; Murphy KM; Unanue ER. 2011. Functional redundancy between thymic CD8alpha+ and Sirp alpha+ conventional dendritic cells in presentation of blood-derived lysozyme by MHC class II proteins. J Immunol 186(3):1421-31. [PubMed: 21178002]  [MGI Ref ID J:168924]

Bar-On L; Birnberg T; Lewis KL; Edelson BT; Bruder D; Hildner K; Buer J; Murphy KM; Reizis B; Jung S. 2010. CX3CR1+ CD8alpha+ dendritic cells are a steady-state population related to plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107(33):14745-50. [PubMed: 20679228]  [MGI Ref ID J:163703]

Caminschi I; Vremec D; Ahmet F; Lahoud MH; Villadangos JA; Murphy KM; Heath WR; Shortman K. 2012. Antibody responses initiated by Clec9A-bearing dendritic cells in normal and Batf3(-/-) mice. Mol Immunol 50(1-2):9-17. [PubMed: 22209163]  [MGI Ref ID J:181366]

Cohen JN; Tewalt EF; Rouhani SJ; Buonomo EL; Bruce AN; Xu X; Bekiranov S; Fu YX; Engelhard VH. 2014. Tolerogenic properties of lymphatic endothelial cells are controlled by the lymph node microenvironment. PLoS One 9(2):e87740. [PubMed: 24503860]  [MGI Ref ID J:212969]

Desch AN; Randolph GJ; Murphy K; Gautier EL; Kedl RM; Lahoud MH; Caminschi I; Shortman K; Henson PM; Jakubzick CV. 2011. CD103+ pulmonary dendritic cells preferentially acquire and present apoptotic cell-associated antigen. J Exp Med 208(9):1789-97. [PubMed: 21859845]  [MGI Ref ID J:177583]

Dragovic SM; Hill T; Christianson GJ; Kim S; Elliott T; Scott D; Roopenian DC; Van Kaer L; Joyce S. 2011. Proteasomes, TAP, and endoplasmic reticulum-associated aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing control CD4+ Th cell responses by regulating indirect presentation of MHC class II-restricted cytoplasmic antigens. J Immunol 186(12):6683-92. [PubMed: 21572029]  [MGI Ref ID J:175483]

Edelson BT; Bradstreet TR; Hildner K; Carrero JA; Frederick KE; KC W; Belizaire R; Aoshi T; Schreiber RD; Miller MJ; Murphy TL; Unanue ER; Murphy KM. 2011. CD8alpha(+) dendritic cells are an obligate cellular entry point for productive infection by Listeria monocytogenes. Immunity 35(2):236-48. [PubMed: 21867927]  [MGI Ref ID J:176233]

Edelson BT; Bradstreet TR; Kc W; Hildner K; Herzog JW; Sim J; Russell JH; Murphy TL; Unanue ER; Murphy KM. 2011. Batf3-Dependent CD11b Peripheral Dendritic Cells Are GM-CSF-Independent and Are Not Required for Th Cell Priming after Subcutaneous Immunization. PLoS One 6(10):e25660. [PubMed: 22065991]  [MGI Ref ID J:178066]

Edelson BT; KC W; Juang R; Kohyama M; Benoit LA; Klekotka PA; Moon C; Albring JC; Ise W; Michael DG; Bhattacharya D; Stappenbeck TS; Holtzman MJ; Sung SS; Murphy TL; Hildner K; Murphy KM. 2010. Peripheral CD103+ dendritic cells form a unified subset developmentally related to CD8alpha+ conventional dendritic cells. J Exp Med 207(4):823-36. [PubMed: 20351058]  [MGI Ref ID J:159175]

Gainey MD; Rivenbark JG; Cho H; Yang L; Yokoyama WM. 2012. Viral MHC class I inhibition evades CD8+ T-cell effector responses in vivo but not CD8+ T-cell priming. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109(47):E3260-7. [PubMed: 23112205]  [MGI Ref ID J:191732]

Gerner MY; Kastenmuller W; Ifrim I; Kabat J; Germain RN. 2012. Histo-cytometry: a method for highly multiplex quantitative tissue imaging analysis applied to dendritic cell subset microanatomy in lymph nodes. Immunity 37(2):364-76. [PubMed: 22863836]  [MGI Ref ID J:187382]

Hildner K; Edelson BT; Purtha WE; Diamond M; Matsushita H; Kohyama M; Calderon B; Schraml BU; Unanue ER; Diamond MS; Schreiber RD; Murphy TL; Murphy KM. 2008. Batf3 deficiency reveals a critical role for CD8alpha+ dendritic cells in cytotoxic T cell immunity. Science 322(5904):1097-100. [PubMed: 19008445]  [MGI Ref ID J:141064]

Igyarto BZ; Haley K; Ortner D; Bobr A; Gerami-Nejad M; Edelson BT; Zurawski SM; Malissen B; Zurawski G; Berman J; Kaplan DH. 2011. Skin-resident murine dendritic cell subsets promote distinct and opposing antigen-specific T helper cell responses. Immunity 35(2):260-72. [PubMed: 21782478]  [MGI Ref ID J:175067]

Jackson JT; Hu Y; Liu R; Masson F; D'Amico A; Carotta S; Xin A; Camilleri MJ; Mount AM; Kallies A; Wu L; Smyth GK; Nutt SL; Belz GT. 2011. Id2 expression delineates differential checkpoints in the genetic program of CD8alpha+ and CD103+ dendritic cell lineages. EMBO J 30(13):2690-704. [PubMed: 21587207]  [MGI Ref ID J:195908]

Jiao J; Dragomir AC; Kocabayoglu P; Rahman AH; Chow A; Hashimoto D; Leboeuf M; Kraus T; Moran T; Carrasco-Avino G; Friedman SL; Merad M; Aloman C. 2014. Central role of conventional dendritic cells in regulation of bone marrow release and survival of neutrophils. J Immunol 192(7):3374-82. [PubMed: 24591364]  [MGI Ref ID J:209877]

Khare A; Krishnamoorthy N; Oriss TB; Fei M; Ray P; Ray A. 2013. Cutting edge: inhaled antigen upregulates retinaldehyde dehydrogenase in lung CD103+ but not plasmacytoid dendritic cells to induce Foxp3 de novo in CD4+ T cells and promote airway tolerance. J Immunol 191(1):25-9. [PubMed: 23733880]  [MGI Ref ID J:205351]

Kim TS; Gorski SA; Hahn S; Murphy KM; Braciale TJ. 2014. Distinct dendritic cell subsets dictate the fate decision between effector and memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation by a CD24-dependent mechanism. Immunity 40(3):400-13. [PubMed: 24631155]  [MGI Ref ID J:210325]

King IL; Amiel E; Tighe M; Mohrs K; Veerapen N; Besra G; Mohrs M; Leadbetter EA. 2013. The mechanism of splenic invariant NKT cell activation dictates localization in vivo. J Immunol 191(2):572-82. [PubMed: 23785119]  [MGI Ref ID J:205445]

Li L; Kim S; Herndon JM; Goedegebuure P; Belt BA; Satpathy AT; Fleming TP; Hansen TH; Murphy KM; Gillanders WE. 2012. Cross-dressed CD8alpha+/CD103+ dendritic cells prime CD8+ T cells following vaccination. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109(31):12716-21. [PubMed: 22802630]  [MGI Ref ID J:188515]

Macleod MK; McKee AS; David A; Wang J; Mason R; Kappler JW; Marrack P. 2011. Vaccine adjuvants aluminum and monophosphoryl lipid A provide distinct signals to generate protective cytotoxic memory CD8 T cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108(19):7914-9. [PubMed: 21518876]  [MGI Ref ID J:172191]

Mashayekhi M; Sandau MM; Dunay IR; Frickel EM; Khan A; Goldszmid RS; Sher A; Ploegh HL; Murphy TL; Sibley LD; Murphy KM. 2011. CD8alpha(+) dendritic cells are the critical source of interleukin-12 that controls acute infection by Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites. Immunity 35(2):249-59. [PubMed: 21867928]  [MGI Ref ID J:176232]

McCartney S; Vermi W; Gilfillan S; Cella M; Murphy TL; Schreiber RD; Murphy KM; Colonna M. 2009. Distinct and complementary functions of MDA5 and TLR3 in poly(I:C)-mediated activation of mouse NK cells. J Exp Med 206(13):2967-76. [PubMed: 19995959]  [MGI Ref ID J:155673]

Newman RG; Dee MJ; Malek TR; Podack ER; Levy RB. 2014. Heat shock protein vaccination and directed IL-2 therapy amplify tumor immunity rapidly following bone marrow transplantation in mice. Blood 123(19):3045-55. [PubMed: 24687086]  [MGI Ref ID J:212412]

Olvera-Gomez I; Hamilton SE; Xiao Z; Guimaraes CP; Ploegh HL; Hogquist KA; Wang L; Jameson SC. 2012. Cholera toxin activates nonconventional adjuvant pathways that induce protective CD8 T-cell responses after epicutaneous vaccination. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109(6):2072-7. [PubMed: 22308317]  [MGI Ref ID J:182026]

Poulin LF; Reyal Y; Uronen-Hansson H; Schraml BU; Sancho D; Murphy KM; Hakansson UK; Ferreira Moita L; Agace WW; Bonnet D; Reis e Sousa C. 2012. DNGR-1 is a specific and universal marker of mouse and human Batf3-dependent dendritic cells in lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues. Blood 119(25):6052-62. [PubMed: 22442345]  [MGI Ref ID J:186734]

Prato S; Zhan Y; Mintern JD; Villadangos JA. 2013. Rapid deletion and inactivation of CTLs upon recognition of a number of target cells over a critical threshold. J Immunol 191(7):3534-44. [PubMed: 24018271]  [MGI Ref ID J:205935]

Quinn KM; Yamamoto A; Costa A; Darrah PA; Lindsay RW; Hegde ST; Johnson TR; Flynn BJ; Lore K; Seder RA. 2013. Coadministration of polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and immunostimulatory complexes modifies antigen processing in dendritic cell subsets and enhances HIV gag-specific T cell immunity. J Immunol 191(10):5085-96. [PubMed: 24089189]  [MGI Ref ID J:206230]

Satpathy AT; Briseno CG; Lee JS; Ng D; Manieri NA; Kc W; Wu X; Thomas SR; Lee WL; Turkoz M; McDonald KG; Meredith MM; Song C; Guidos CJ; Newberry RD; Ouyang W; Murphy TL; Stappenbeck TS; Gommerman JL; Nussenzweig MC; Colonna M; Kopan R; Murphy KM. 2013. Notch2-dependent classical dendritic cells orchestrate intestinal immunity to attaching-and-effacing bacterial pathogens. Nat Immunol 14(9):937-48. [PubMed: 23913046]  [MGI Ref ID J:208234]

Seillet C; Jackson JT; Markey KA; Brady HJ; Hill GR; Macdonald KP; Nutt SL; Belz GT. 2013. CD8alpha+ DCs can be induced in the absence of transcription factors Id2, Nfil3, and Batf3. Blood 121(9):1574-83. [PubMed: 23297132]  [MGI Ref ID J:194760]

Smyth LA; Hervouet C; Hayday T; Becker PD; Ellis R; Lechler RI; Lombardi G; Klavinskis LS. 2012. Acquisition of MHC:peptide complexes by dendritic cells contributes to the generation of antiviral CD8+ T cell immunity in vivo. J Immunol 189(5):2274-82. [PubMed: 22821960]  [MGI Ref ID J:189730]

Smyth LA; Ratnasothy K; Moreau A; Alcock S; Sagoo P; Meader L; Tanriver Y; Buckland M; Lechler R; Lombardi G. 2013. Tolerogenic Donor-Derived Dendritic Cells Risk Sensitization In Vivo owing to Processing and Presentation by Recipient APCs. J Immunol 190(9):4848-60. [PubMed: 23536635]  [MGI Ref ID J:195514]

Tewalt EF; Cohen JN; Rouhani SJ; Guidi CJ; Qiao H; Fahl SP; Conaway MR; Bender TP; Tung KS; Vella AT; Adler AJ; Chen L; Engelhard VH. 2012. Lymphatic endothelial cells induce tolerance via PD-L1 and lack of costimulation leading to high-level PD-1 expression on CD8 T cells. Blood 120(24):4772-82. [PubMed: 22993390]  [MGI Ref ID J:192127]

Torti N; Walton SM; Murphy KM; Oxenius A. 2011. Batf3 transcription factor-dependent DC subsets in murine CMV infection: Differential impact on T-cell priming and memory inflation. Eur J Immunol 41(9):2612-8. [PubMed: 21604258]  [MGI Ref ID J:176829]

Toubai T; Sun Y; Luker G; Liu J; Luker KE; Tawara I; Evers R; Liu C; Mathewson N; Malter C; Nieves E; Choi S; Murphy KM; Reddy P. 2013. Host-derived CD8+ dendritic cells are required for induction of optimal graft-versus-tumor responses after experimental allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Blood 121(20):4231-41. [PubMed: 23520337]  [MGI Ref ID J:197914]

Trsan T; Busche A; Abram M; Wensveen FM; Lemmermann NA; Arapovic M; Babic M; Tomic A; Golemac M; Brinkmann MM; Jager W; Oxenius A; Polic B; Krmpotic A; Messerle M; Jonjic S. 2013. Superior induction and maintenance of protective CD8 T cells in mice infected with mouse cytomegalovirus vector expressing RAE-1gamma. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110(41):16550-5. [PubMed: 24052528]  [MGI Ref ID J:202322]

Tussiwand R; Lee WL; Murphy TL; Mashayekhi M; Wumesh KC; Albring JC; Satpathy AT; Rotondo JA; Edelson BT; Kretzer NM; Wu X; Weiss LA; Glasmacher E; Li P; Liao W; Behnke M; Lam SS; Aurthur CT; Leonard WJ; Singh H; Stallings CL; Sibley LD; Schreiber RD; Murphy KM. 2012. Compensatory dendritic cell development mediated by BATF-IRF interactions. Nature 490(7421):502-7. [PubMed: 22992524]  [MGI Ref ID J:188767]

Welty NE; Staley C; Ghilardi N; Sadowsky MJ; Igyarto BZ; Kaplan DH. 2013. Intestinal lamina propria dendritic cells maintain T cell homeostasis but do not affect commensalism. J Exp Med 210(10):2011-24. [PubMed: 24019552]  [MGI Ref ID J:203803]

Yang X; Zhang X; Fu ML; Weichselbaum RR; Gajewski TF; Guo Y; Fu YX. 2014. Targeting the tumor microenvironment with interferon-beta bridges innate and adaptive immune responses. Cancer Cell 25(1):37-48. [PubMed: 24434209]  [MGI Ref ID J:208155]

Yu X; Guo C; Yi H; Qian J; Fisher PB; Subjeck JR; Wang XY. 2013. A multifunctional chimeric chaperone serves as a novel immune modulator inducing therapeutic antitumor immunity. Cancer Res 73(7):2093-103. [PubMed: 23333935]  [MGI Ref ID J:196898]

Zelenay S; Keller AM; Whitney PG; Schraml BU; Deddouche S; Rogers NC; Schulz O; Sancho D; Reis e Sousa C. 2012. The dendritic cell receptor DNGR-1 controls endocytic handling of necrotic cell antigens to favor cross-priming of CTLs in virus-infected mice. J Clin Invest 122(5):1615-27. [PubMed: 22505458]  [MGI Ref ID J:184531]

Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Room Number           FGB27

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryWhen maintaining a live colony, homozygous mice may be bred together.
Mating SystemHomozygote x Homozygote         (Female x Male)   02-MAR-11
Diet Information LabDiet® 5K52/5K67

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $199.90Female or MaleHomozygous for Batf3tm1.1Kmm  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$399.80Homozygous for Batf3tm1.1Kmm x Homozygous for Batf3tm1.1Kmm  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $259.90Female or MaleHomozygous for Batf3tm1.1Kmm  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$519.80Homozygous for Batf3tm1.1Kmm x Homozygous for Batf3tm1.1Kmm  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

Control Information

  Control
   000651 BALB/cJ
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
Surgical and Preconditioning Services
JAX® Services
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Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
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Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


For Licensing and Use Restrictions view the link(s) below:
- Use of MICE by companies or for-profit entities requires a license prior to shipping.

Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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