Strain Name:

B6N.129P2-Adora1tm1Bbf/J

Stock Number:

014161

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Availability:

Cryopreserved - Ready for recovery

In this A1R knockout strain, a neomycin resistance cassette replaces exon 2 of the endogenous adenosine A1 receptor gene. These mice may be useful for studying pharmacological uses of adenosine regarding cardiac function, oxygen consumption, and insulin secretion.

Description

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Specieslaboratory mouse
GenerationN5pN1
Generation Definitions
 
Donating Investigator Bertil Fredholm,   Karolinjska Institute

Description
In this A1R strain, neomycin resistance (neo) cassette replaces exon 2 of the endogenous adenosine A1 receptor (Adora1) gene, abolishing gene function. Heterozygotes are viable, fertile, and normal in size. Homozygotes have a decreased survival rate after 5 months of age and males exhibit reduced fertility. The binding of adenosine to A1R inhibits excitatory synaptic transmissions in the brain and causes dilation of veins and arteries. These mice exhibit an increase in hyperalgesia, anxiety, hypoxic damage, lipolysis, insulin secretion, osteopetrosis, and susceptibility to epilepsy. They also have abolished tubuloglomerular feedback and a reduction in ischemic preconditioning. These mice have a decrease recovery rate after hypoxic or ischemic stress.

Development
A targeting vector was designed to replace exon 2 of the adenosine A1 receptor (Adora1 or A1R) gene with a neomycin resistance (neo) cassette. The construct was electroporated into 129P2/OlaHsd-derived E14.1 embryonic stem (ES) cells. Correctly targeted ES cells were injected into blastocysts and the resulting chimeric males were bred to C57BL/6N females to generate a colony of A1R mice. These mice were backcrossed on to a C57BL/6NTac background using a speed congenic protocol at The Jackson Laboratory. Mice were bred to C57BL/6NJ (Stock No. 005304) for at least one generation to establish the colony.

Control Information

  Control
   Wild-type from the colony
   005304 C57BL/6NJ (approximate)
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Adora1tm1Bbf/Adora1tm1Bbf

        B6.129P2-Adora1tm1Bbf
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • allodynia
    • in the complete Freund's adjuvant model of chronic inflammatory pain or in the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain, mice injected with human ACPP exhibit increased mechanical allodynia compared with wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:149872)
  • decreased thermal nociceptive threshold
    • in mice injected with human ACPP   (MGI Ref ID J:149872)
    • in mice injected with human ACPP in the complete Freund's adjuvant model of chronic inflammatory pain or in the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain   (MGI Ref ID J:149872)
  • integument phenotype
  • allodynia
    • in the complete Freund's adjuvant model of chronic inflammatory pain or in the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain, mice injected with human ACPP exhibit increased mechanical allodynia compared with wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:149872)
  • decreased thermal nociceptive threshold
    • in mice injected with human ACPP   (MGI Ref ID J:149872)
    • in mice injected with human ACPP in the complete Freund's adjuvant model of chronic inflammatory pain or in the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain   (MGI Ref ID J:149872)

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Adora1tm1Bbf/Adora1tm1Bbf

        involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal body temperature homeostasis
    • homozygotes exhibit normal body temperature relative to wild-type or heterozygous control mice; however, the hypothermia induced by i.p. administration of A1R agonist N6-cyclohexyladenosine (0.1 mg/kg) in wild-type mice (-3.4 0.16C) is abolished (-0.08 0.39C) in homozygous mutant mice   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • hyperalgesia
    • homozygotes exhibit thermal (but not mechanical) hyperalgesia relative to wild-type or heterozygous mice   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
    • decreased thermal nociceptive threshold
      • homozygotes react faster to thermal pain, as shown by significanlty reduced latencies under basal conditions or after intrathecal administration of adenosine analogue R-PIA in the tail-flick test   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
      • i.p. administration of morphine (5 mg/kg) has no effect on thermal nociception   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
  • increased anxiety-related response
    • homozygotes display increased anxiety in the dark-light box test, with a significantly reduced number of entries into as well as less total time spent in the lit compartment   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
    • notably, homozygotes show no significant differences in visual placing reflex, equilibrium, prehensility or total activity over a 24-h period relative to wild-type or heterozygous mice   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • *normal* cardiovascular system phenotype
    • homozygotes are viable, fertile and display no significant differences in heart rate or blood pressure relative to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal CNS synaptic transmission
    • homozygotes display complete loss of both adenosine-mediated inhibition and theophylline-mediated augmentation of excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
    • abnormal excitatory postsynaptic currents
      • electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal slices indicate that homozygotes fail to exhibit adenosine-mediated inhibition of EPSCs   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
    • abnormal excitatory postsynaptic potential
      • electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal slices indicate that homozygotes fail to exhibit adenosine-mediated inhibition of fEPSPs   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
      • in response to hypoxia/anoxia, homozygotes show a significantly delayed and attenuated inhibition of fEPSP responses in hippocampal slices, with no recovery after 60 min of incubation in hypoxic buffer   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
    • decreased synaptic depression
      • homozygotes exhibit a reduced response to hypoxia/anoxia, with mutant hippocampal slices exhibiting a delayed and attenuated decrease in synaptic transmission relative to wild-type slices   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
  • respiratory system phenotype
  • abnormal respiratory mechanics
    • in reponse to hypoxia, brainstem spinal cord preparations from wild-type mice show a decrease in respiratory output within 3 min after the onset of hypoxia, with full recovery of the respiratory rhythm and brainstem neuronal activity upon reintroduction of oxygenated medium; in mutant preparations, the depression in respiratory output is significantly delayed and full recovery is not attained   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
  • integument phenotype
  • hyperalgesia
    • homozygotes exhibit thermal (but not mechanical) hyperalgesia relative to wild-type or heterozygous mice   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
    • decreased thermal nociceptive threshold
      • homozygotes react faster to thermal pain, as shown by significanlty reduced latencies under basal conditions or after intrathecal administration of adenosine analogue R-PIA in the tail-flick test   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)
      • i.p. administration of morphine (5 mg/kg) has no effect on thermal nociception   (MGI Ref ID J:70664)

Adora1tm1Bbf/Adora1tm1Bbf

        involves: 129P2/OlaHsd * C57BL/6
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • *normal* homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
    • response to caffeine induced wakefulness is similar to wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:99612)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Cardiovascular Research
Other
      altered lipoprotein profile

Developmental Biology Research
Internal/Organ Defects
      heart: vasculature
Skeletal Defects
      osteopetrosis

Diabetes and Obesity Research
Hyperinsulinemia

Neurobiology Research
Epilepsy
Receptor Defects

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Adora1tm1Bbf
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Bertil B Fredholm
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Common Name(s) A1-KO; A1AR-; A1R-;
Mutation Made By Bertil Fredholm,   Karolinjska Institute
Strain of Origin129P2/OlaHsd
Gene Symbol and Name Adora1, adenosine A1 receptor
Chromosome 1
Gene Common Name(s) A1-AR; A1AR; A1R; AA1R; AI848715; BB176431; RDC7; Ri; expressed sequence AI848715; expressed sequence BB176431;
Molecular Note A PGK-neo cassette replaced most of the coding region and a portion of the of the 3' flanking region of the targeted exon. An absence of the normal protein was observed using in situ hybridization and autoradiographic analysis using a labeled ligand, DPCPX. [MGI Ref ID J:70664]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Adora1tm1Bbf, Separated PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Selected Reference(s)

Johansson B; Halldner L; Dunwiddie TV; Masino SA; Poelchen W; Gimenez-Llort L; Escorihuela RM; Fernandez-Teruel A; Wiesenfeld-Hallin Z; Xu XJ; Hardemark A; Betsholtz C; Herlenius E; Fredholm BB. 2001. Hyperalgesia, anxiety, and decreased hypoxic neuroprotection in mice lacking the adenosine A1 receptor. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98(16):9407-12. [PubMed: 11470917]  [MGI Ref ID J:70664]

Additional References

Adora1tm1Bbf related

Brown R; Ollerstam A; Johansson B; Skott O; Gebre-Medhin S; Fredholm B; Persson AE. 2001. Abolished tubuloglomerular feedback and increased plasma renin in adenosine A1 receptor-deficient mice. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 281(5):R1362-7. [PubMed: 11641103]  [MGI Ref ID J:72555]

Brown RD; Thoren P; Steege A; Mrowka R; Sallstrom J; Skott O; Fredholm BB; Persson AE. 2006. Influence of the adenosine A1 receptor on blood pressure regulation and renin release. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 290(5):R1324-9. [PubMed: 16357099]  [MGI Ref ID J:115766]

Buscariollo DL; Breuer GA; Wendler CC; Rivkees SA. 2011. Caffeine acts via A1 adenosine receptors to disrupt embryonic cardiac function. PLoS One 6(12):e28296. [PubMed: 22164264]  [MGI Ref ID J:182263]

Fedele DE; Li T; Lan JQ; Fredholm BB; Boison D. 2006. Adenosine A1 receptors are crucial in keeping an epileptic focus localized. Exp Neurol 200(1):184-90. [PubMed: 16750195]  [MGI Ref ID J:111215]

Figler RA; Wang G; Srinivasan S; Jung DY; Zhang Z; Pankow JS; Ravid K; Fredholm B; Hedrick CC; Rich SS; Kim JK; LaNoue KF; Linden J. 2011. Links between insulin resistance, adenosine A2B receptors, and inflammatory markers in mice and humans. Diabetes 60(2):669-79. [PubMed: 21270276]  [MGI Ref ID J:169783]

Fredholm BB. 2007. Adenosine, an endogenous distress signal, modulates tissue damage and repair. Cell Death Differ 14(7):1315-23. [PubMed: 17396131]  [MGI Ref ID J:139270]

Gao X; Patzak A; Sendeski M; Scheffer PG; Teerlink T; Sallstrom J; Fredholm BB; Persson AE; Carlstrom M. 2011. Adenosine A1-receptor deficiency diminishes afferent arteriolar and blood pressure responses during nitric oxide inhibition and angiotensin II treatment. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 301(6):R1669-81. [PubMed: 21975649]  [MGI Ref ID J:178768]

Ghanem E; Lovdahl C; Dare E; Ledent C; Fredholm BB; Boeynaems JM; Van Driessche W; Beauwens R. 2005. Luminal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion through A1 receptor in mouse jejunum. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 288(5):G972-7. [PubMed: 15637180]  [MGI Ref ID J:115467]

Gimenez-Llort L; Fernandez-Teruel A; Escorihuela RM; Fredholm BB; Tobena A; Pekny M; Johansson B. 2002. Mice lacking the adenosine A1 receptor are anxious and aggressive, but are normal learners with reduced muscle strength and survival rate. Eur J Neurosci 16(3):547-50. [PubMed: 12193199]  [MGI Ref ID J:108009]

Halldner L; Aden U; Dahlberg V; Johansson B; Ledent C; Fredholm BB. 2004. The adenosine A1 receptor contributes to the stimulatory, but not the inhibitory effect of caffeine on locomotion: a study in mice lacking adenosine A1 and/or A2A receptors. Neuropharmacology 46(7):1008-17. [PubMed: 15081797]  [MGI Ref ID J:97184]

Huang ZL; Qu WM; Eguchi N; Chen JF; Schwarzschild MA; Fredholm BB; Urade Y; Hayaishi O. 2005. Adenosine A2A, but not A1, receptors mediate the arousal effect of caffeine. Nat Neurosci 8(7):858-9. [PubMed: 15965471]  [MGI Ref ID J:99612]

Hurt JK; Coleman JL; Fitzpatrick BJ; Taylor-Blake B; Bridges AS; Vihko P; Zylka MJ. 2012. Prostatic acid phosphatase is required for the antinociceptive effects of thiamine and benfotiamine. PLoS One 7(10):e48562. [PubMed: 23119057]  [MGI Ref ID J:192276]

Johansson SM; Lindgren E; Yang JN; Herling AW; Fredholm BB. 2008. Adenosine A1 receptors regulate lipolysis and lipogenesis in mouse adipose tissue-interactions with insulin. Eur J Pharmacol 597(1-3):92-101. [PubMed: 18789919]  [MGI Ref ID J:142525]

Johansson SM; Salehi A; Sandstrom ME; Westerblad H; Lundquist I; Carlsson PO; Fredholm BB; Katz A. 2007. A1 receptor deficiency causes increased insulin and glucagon secretion in mice. Biochem Pharmacol 74(11):1628-35. [PubMed: 17869224]  [MGI Ref ID J:145109]

Kara FM; Chitu V; Sloane J; Axelrod M; Fredholm BB; Stanley ER; Cronstein BN. 2010. Adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) play a critical role in osteoclast formation and function. FASEB J 24(7):2325-33. [PubMed: 20181934]  [MGI Ref ID J:162359]

Kukley M; Schwan M; Fredholm BB; Dietrich D. 2005. The role of extracellular adenosine in regulating mossy fiber synaptic plasticity. J Neurosci 25(11):2832-7. [PubMed: 15772343]  [MGI Ref ID J:98621]

Lankford AR; Yang JN; Rose'Meyer R; French BA; Matherne GP; Fredholm BB; Yang Z. 2006. Effect of modulating cardiac A1 adenosine receptor expression on protection with ischemic preconditioning. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 290(4):H1469-73. [PubMed: 16299262]  [MGI Ref ID J:108911]

Masino SA; Li T; Theofilas P; Sandau US; Ruskin DN; Fredholm BB; Geiger JD; Aronica E; Boison D. 2011. A ketogenic diet suppresses seizures in mice through adenosine A receptors. J Clin Invest 121(7):2679-83. [PubMed: 21701065]  [MGI Ref ID J:175631]

Minelli A; Liguori L; Bellazza I; Mannucci R; Johansson B; Fredholm BB. 2004. Involvement of A1 adenosine receptors in the acquisition of fertilizing capacity. J Androl 25(2):286-92. [PubMed: 14760015]  [MGI Ref ID J:105379]

Oishi Y; Huang ZL; Fredholm BB; Urade Y; Hayaishi O. 2008. Adenosine in the tuberomammillary nucleus inhibits the histaminergic system via A1 receptors and promotes non-rapid eye movement sleep. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105(50):19992-7. [PubMed: 19066225]  [MGI Ref ID J:142664]

Olsson T; Cronberg T; Rytter A; Asztely F; Fredholm BB; Smith ML; Wieloch T. 2004. Deletion of the adenosine A1 receptor gene does not alter neuronal damage following ischaemia in vivo or in vitro. Eur J Neurosci 20(5):1197-204. [PubMed: 15341591]  [MGI Ref ID J:101298]

Peng Z; Borea PA; Wilder T; Yee H; Chiriboga L; Blackburn MR; Azzena G; Resta G; Cronstein BN. 2009. Adenosine signaling contributes to ethanol-induced fatty liver in mice. J Clin Invest 119(3):582-94. [PubMed: 19221436]  [MGI Ref ID J:146795]

Ponnoth DS; Nadeem A; Tilley S; Mustafa SJ. 2010. Involvement of A1 adenosine receptors in altered vascular responses and inflammation in an allergic mouse model of asthma. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 299(1):H81-7. [PubMed: 20400685]  [MGI Ref ID J:162810]

Roseti C; Martinello K; Fucile S; Piccari V; Mascia A; Di Gennaro G; Quarato PP; Manfredi M; Esposito V; Cantore G; Arcella A; Simonato M; Fredholm BB; Limatola C; Miledi R; Eusebi F. 2008. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105(39):15118-23. [PubMed: 18809912]  [MGI Ref ID J:143095]

Sawynok J; Reid AR; Fredholm BB. 2008. Caffeine reverses antinociception by amitriptyline in wild type mice but not in those lacking adenosine A1 receptors. Neurosci Lett 440(2):181-4. [PubMed: 18562097]  [MGI Ref ID J:139173]

Sawynok J; Reid AR; Fredholm BB. 2010. Caffeine reverses antinociception by oxcarbazepine by inhibition of adenosine A1 receptors: insights using knockout mice. Neurosci Lett 473(3):178-81. [PubMed: 20176083]  [MGI Ref ID J:159911]

Sowa NA; Street SE; Vihko P; Zylka MJ. 2010. Prostatic acid phosphatase reduces thermal sensitivity and chronic pain sensitization by depleting phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. J Neurosci 30(31):10282-93. [PubMed: 20685973]  [MGI Ref ID J:167649]

Sowa NA; Taylor-Blake B; Zylka MJ. 2010. Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) inhibits nociception by hydrolyzing AMP to adenosine in nociceptive circuits. J Neurosci 30(6):2235-44. [PubMed: 20147550]  [MGI Ref ID J:157843]

Stenberg D; Litonius E; Halldner L; Johansson B; Fredholm BB; Porkka-Heiskanen T. 2003. Sleep and its homeostatic regulation in mice lacking the adenosine A1 receptor. J Sleep Res 12(4):283-90. [PubMed: 14633239]  [MGI Ref ID J:103906]

Street SE; Kramer NJ; Walsh PL; Taylor-Blake B; Yadav MC; King IF; Vihko P; Wightman RM; Millan JL; Zylka MJ. 2013. Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase acts redundantly with PAP and NT5E to generate adenosine in the dorsal spinal cord. J Neurosci 33(27):11314-22. [PubMed: 23825434]  [MGI Ref ID J:199822]

Sturgess JE; Ting-A-Kee RA; Podbielski D; Sellings LH; Chen JF; van der Kooy D. 2010. Adenosine A1 and A2A receptors are not upstream of caffeine's dopamine D2 receptor-dependent aversive effects and dopamine-independent rewarding effects. Eur J Neurosci 32(1):143-54. [PubMed: 20576036]  [MGI Ref ID J:171784]

Turner CP; Seli M; Ment L; Stewart W; Yan H; Johansson B; Fredholm BB; Blackburn M; Rivkees SA. 2003. A1 adenosine receptors mediate hypoxia-induced ventriculomegaly. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100(20):11718-22. [PubMed: 12975523]  [MGI Ref ID J:85820]

Wendler CC; Amatya S; McClaskey C; Ghatpande S; Fredholm BB; Rivkees SA. 2007. A1 adenosine receptors play an essential role in protecting the embryo against hypoxia. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104(23):9697-702. [PubMed: 17522253]  [MGI Ref ID J:143831]

Wu WP; Hao JX; Halldner L; Lovdahl C; DeLander GE; Wiesenfeld-Hallin Z; Fredholm BB; Xu XJ. 2005. Increased nociceptive response in mice lacking the adenosine A1 receptor. Pain 113(3):395-404. [PubMed: 15661449]  [MGI Ref ID J:101957]

Yang GK; Fredholm BB; Kieffer TJ; Kwok YN. 2012. Improved blood glucose disposal and altered insulin secretion patterns in adenosine A(1) receptor knockout mice. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 303(2):E180-90. [PubMed: 22550063]  [MGI Ref ID J:187189]

Yang JN; Bjorklund O; Lindstrom-Tornqvist K; Lindgren E; Eriksson TM; Kahlstrom J; Chen JF; Schwarzschild MA; Tobler I; Fredholm BB. 2009. Mice heterozygous for both A1 and A(2A) adenosine receptor genes show similarities to mice given long-term caffeine. J Appl Physiol 106(2):631-9. [PubMed: 19036889]  [MGI Ref ID J:165005]

Yang JN; Chen JF; Fredholm BB. 2009. Physiological roles of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors in regulating heart rate, body temperature, and locomotion as revealed using knockout mice and caffeine. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 296(4):H1141-9. [PubMed: 19218506]  [MGI Ref ID J:150897]

Zhou X; Teng B; Tilley S; Mustafa SJ. 2013. A1 adenosine receptor negatively modulates coronary reactive hyperemia via counteracting A2A-mediated H2O2 production and KATP opening in isolated mouse hearts. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 305(11):H1668-79. [PubMed: 24043252]  [MGI Ref ID J:204608]

Zylka MJ; Sowa NA; Taylor-Blake B; Twomey MA; Herrala A; Voikar V; Vihko P. 2008. Prostatic acid phosphatase is an ectonucleotidase and suppresses pain by generating adenosine. Neuron 60(1):111-22. [PubMed: 18940592]  [MGI Ref ID J:149872]

Health & husbandry

The genotypes of the animals provided may not reflect those discussed in the strain description or the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation. Please inquire for possible genotypes for this specific strain.

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Production of mice from cryopreserved embryos or sperm occurs in a maximum barrier room, G200.

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryWhen maintaining a live colony, heterozygous mice may be bred to wildtype mice from the colony or to C57BL/6NJ inbred mice (Stock No. 005304). Homozygotes have a decreased survival rate after 5 months of age and males exhibit reduced fertility.

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $2525.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We willfulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Cryopreserved

Cryopreserved Mice - Ready for Recovery

Price (US dollars $)
Cryorecovery* $3283.00
Animals Provided

At least two mice that carry the mutation (if it is a mutant strain) will be provided. Their genotypes may not reflect those discussed in the strain description. Please inquire for possible genotypes and see additional details below.

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Supply Notes

  • Cryorecovery - Standard.
    Progeny testing is not required.

    The average number of mice provided from recovery of our cryopreserved strains is 10. The total number of animals provided, their gender and genotype will vary. We willfulfill your order by providing at least two pair of mice, at least one animal of each pair carrying the mutation of interest. Please inquire if larger numbers of animals with specific genotype and genders are needed. Animals typically ship between 10 and 14 weeks from the date of your order. If a second cryorecovery is needed in order to provide the minimum number of animals, animals will ship within 25 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The genotypes of animals provided may not reflect the mating scheme utilized by The Jackson Laboratory prior to cryopreservation, or that discussed in the strain description. Please inquire about possible genotypes which will be recovered for this specific strain. The Jackson Laboratory cannot guarantee the reproductive success of mice shipped to your facility. If the mice are lost after the first three days (post-arrival) or do not produce progeny at your facility, a new order and fee will be necessary.

    Cryorecovery to establish a Dedicated Supply for greater quantities of mice. Mice recovered can be used to establish a dedicated colony to contractually supply you mice according to your requirements. Price by quotation. For more information on Dedicated Supply, please contact JAX® Services, Tel: 1-800-422-6423 (from U.S.A., Canada or Puerto Rico only) or 1-207-288-5845 (from any location).

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Cryopreserved. Ready for recovery. Please refer to pricing and supply notes on the strain data sheet for further information.

Control Information

  Control
   Wild-type from the colony
   005304 C57BL/6NJ (approximate)
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

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The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
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"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

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In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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