Strain Name:

B6.129S1-Cd36tm1Mfe/J

Stock Number:

019006

Order this mouse

Availability:

Repository- Live

Use Restrictions Apply, see Terms of Use
In this Cd36 knockout strain, a range of lipid-related metabolic traits are observed: reduced preference for food rich in fat, altered fatty acid uptake and lowered food intake. They may be useful in studies of taste preference, glucose metabolism, lipid homeostasis, hemostasis, thrombosis, malaria, inflammation, and atherogenesis.

Description

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Mating SystemHomozygote x Homozygote         (Female x Male)   31-DEC-13
Specieslaboratory mouse
GenerationF?p+N1f2 (11-DEC-13)
Generation Definitions
 
Donating Investigator Maria Febbraio,   Cleveland Clinic

Description
CD36 is a class B scavenger receptor that is involved in fatty acid and glucose metabolism, heart disease, gustatory taste of lipid/fat, and lipid metabolism. CD36 also functions as a microglial surface receptor for amyloid beta peptide. These mutant mice carry a targeted mutation in which exon 3, which encodes the first 40 amino acids and the translation initiation site, is replaced by a NEO cassette (in opposite orientation). Mice that are homozygous for the targeted mutation are viable and fertile, but smaller in size than controls. No gene product (protein) is detected by immunoprecipitation or Western blot analysis of fat, muscle, heart, macrophages, liver, and endothelial cells from homozygotes. Homozygotes eat less and have a reduced preference for food rich in fat. Mutant homozygous mice exhibit increased plasma ketone (beta hydroxybutyrate) and circulating HDL cholesterol levels; elevated fasting levels of nonesterified free fatty acids, and triacylglycerol; and decreased fasting blood glucose levels, when compared to controls. Uptake of fatty acids is decreased in muscle, heart and adipose tissue in homozygotes. IgM levels and transitional B cells in spleen and bone are increased in homozygotes. The increase in cerebral blood flow induced by amyloid-beta peptide is absent in homozygotes. Following experimentally induced injury, regenerating nerves have thinner myelination and more macrophages present than seen in controls. The resting coronary resistance blood pressure is lower in homozygotes than in controls.

Development
While at Weill Medical College (Cornell University), Dr. Maria Febbraio designed a targeting vector containing a NEO cassette in opposite transcription orientation was used to disrupt exon 3, encoding the first 40 amino acids and the translation initiation site. The construct was electroporated into 129S1/Sv-Oca2+ Tyr+ Kitl+ derived CJ7 embryonic stem (ES) cells. Correctly targeted ES cells were injected into blastocysts. The resulting male chimeric animals were crossed to C57BL/6 mice. The mice were then backcrossed to C57BL/6J for 10 generations. Upon arrival at The Jackson Laboratory, the mice were crossed to C57BL/6J (Stock No. 000664) at least once to establish the colony.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Related Disease (OMIM) Terms

Related Disease (OMIM) Terms provided by MGI
- Model with phenotypic similarity to human disease where etiologies involve orthologs. Human genes are associated with this disease. Orthologs of those genes appear in the mouse genotype(s).
Platelet Glycoprotein IV Deficiency
- Potential model based on gene homology relationships. Phenotypic similarity to the human disease has not been tested.
Coronary Heart Disease, Susceptibility to, 7; CHDS7   (CD36)
Malaria, Susceptibility to   (CD36)
View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

Cd36tm1Mfe/Cd36tm1Mfe

        B6.129S1-Cd36tm1Mfe
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • decreased body weight
    • significantly lower body weight   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal food intake
    • lower food intake   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
  • abnormal food preference
    • loss of normal preference for linoleic acid solutions   (MGI Ref ID J:102503)
    • reduced preference for solid diets enriched with long-chain fatty acids   (MGI Ref ID J:102503)
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • abnormal glucose homeostasis
    • tend to have a higher whole body glucose uptake, but not significant   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
    • glucose uptake significantly increased during a hyperinsulinemia clamp   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
    • glucose uptake increases in skeletal muscle but not in adipose tissue   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
    • increased basal glucose oxidation   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
    • muscle glycogen is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
    • abnormal gluconeogenesis
      • endogenous glucose production increases more during hyperinsulinemia   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
      • insulin does not inhibit glucose production in the liver   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
  • abnormal lipid level   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
    • abnormal circulating lipid level   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
      • increased circulating triglyceride level   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
    • abnormal fatty acid level   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
      • decreased fatty acid level
        • decreased fatty acid uptake in muscle after an overnight fast   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
        • decreased liver free fatty acids level
          • after three day gavage with LXR agonists   (MGI Ref ID J:135594)
      • increased fatty acid level
        • increased fatty acid uptake in the liver after an overnight fast   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
        • increased circulating free fatty acid level   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
    • decreased liver triglyceride level
      • after three day gavage with LXR agonists   (MGI Ref ID J:135594)
    • increased liver triglyceride level
      • after an overnight fast   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
  • increased circulating ketone body level
    • plasma ketone bodies are increased   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
  • thrombosis
    • time to complete thrombotic occlusion resulting from 7.5% FeCl3 treatment of the carotid artery is doubled relative to controls   (MGI Ref ID J:136325)
    • using a 12.5% dose of FeCl3, thrombotic occlusion time is essentially identical to controls   (MGI Ref ID J:136325)
    • reduced endothelial microparticle incorporation into thrombi   (MGI Ref ID J:136325)
  • endocrine/exocrine gland phenotype
  • abnormal exocrine pancreas physiology
    • pancreatobiliary flux and protein content are not induced by linoleic acid intake as occurs in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:102503)
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal B cell morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
    • abnormal plasma cell differentiation
      • reduced plasma cell generation   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
    • increased transitional stage B cell number
      • slight increase in spleen and bone marrow transitional B cells   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
  • decreased immunoglobulin level   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
    • decreased IgG level
      • non-statistical reductions in IgG response to particulate antigens   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
      • decreased IgG1 level   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
      • decreased IgG2a level   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
      • decreased IgG2c level   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
    • decreased IgM level
      • response to particulate antigens is reduced to 65% of normal at 7 days   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
  • liver/biliary system phenotype
  • abnormal liver physiology
    • dramatically reduced LXR agonists induce hepatic lipid accumulation   (MGI Ref ID J:135594)
  • decreased liver free fatty acids level
    • after three day gavage with LXR agonists   (MGI Ref ID J:135594)
  • decreased liver triglyceride level
    • after three day gavage with LXR agonists   (MGI Ref ID J:135594)
  • increased liver triglyceride level
    • after an overnight fast   (MGI Ref ID J:87372)
  • digestive/alimentary phenotype
  • abnormal exocrine pancreas physiology
    • pancreatobiliary flux and protein content are not induced by linoleic acid intake as occurs in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:102503)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal B cell morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
    • abnormal plasma cell differentiation
      • reduced plasma cell generation   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
    • increased transitional stage B cell number
      • slight increase in spleen and bone marrow transitional B cells   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
  • decreased immunoglobulin level   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
    • decreased IgG level
      • non-statistical reductions in IgG response to particulate antigens   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
      • decreased IgG1 level   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
      • decreased IgG2a level   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
      • decreased IgG2c level   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)
    • decreased IgM level
      • response to particulate antigens is reduced to 65% of normal at 7 days   (MGI Ref ID J:130897)

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Cd36tm1Mfe/Cd36tm1Mfe

        involves: 129S1/Sv * C57BL/6
  • homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
  • *normal* homeostasis/metabolism phenotype
    • glycogen synthesis is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
    • abnormal basal metabolism
      • unadjusted metabolic rate is reduced by 15%   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
      • rate adjusted to body weight is normal   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
    • abnormal homeostasis   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
      • abnormal hormone level   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
        • decreased adiponectin level
          • blood levels are decreased   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
        • increased circulating leptin level
          • plasma levels are 2 fold higher than for controls, even when fasted   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
          • increased leptin mRNA in adipocytes   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
          • leptin response to intragastric glucose administration is strongly enhanced and persists at least 4 hours   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
      • abnormal lipid homeostasis
        • the uptake of oleate, a long chain fatty acid, by adipoctyes is reduced at low fatty acid:BSA ratios, indicating the absence of high affinity uptake in these cells   (MGI Ref ID J:56081)
        • adipocytes exhibit an increased incorporation of palmitate into diacylglycerol   (MGI Ref ID J:56081)
        • elicited peritoneal macrophages exhibit a 40-47% decrease in binding of oxidized LDL at saturation and a 63% decrease in cell association   (MGI Ref ID J:56081)
        • abnormal cholesterol homeostasis
          • high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles are larger and contain increased phospholipid   (MGI Ref ID J:56081)
          • increased circulating cholesterol level
            • higher fasting and nonfasting levels of cholesterol   (MGI Ref ID J:56081)
            • increased circulating HDL cholesterol level
              • increase in cholesterol level is mainly due to an increase in the HDL fraction   (MGI Ref ID J:56081)
        • abnormal intestinal lipid absorption
          • 50% reduction in oleic acid uptake in the first third of the small intestine   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
          • also reduced uptake in the middle third but not in the distal third   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
          • reduced incorporation of fatty acids into triglycerides in the first third of the small intestine   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
          • decreased secretion of newly synthesized triglycerides in the first third but not the remainder of the small intestine   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
          • decreased intestinal cholesterol absorption
            • more cholesterol retained in the intestinal lumen   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
            • 50% reduction in cholesterol output to lymph   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
            • cholesterol uptake in the first third of the small intestine is reduced more than 60%   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
            • no defect in cholesterol uptake in the distal two-thirds of the small intestine   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
        • abnormal triglyceride level
          • reduced incorporation of glucose into triglycerides   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
          • decreased triglyceride level
            • decrease in triglyceride levels in the heart   (MGI Ref ID J:83611)
          • increased circulating triglyceride level
            • higher fasting levels of triacylglycerol, mainly within the very low density lipoprotein fraction   (MGI Ref ID J:56081)
            • increased circulating VLDL triglyceride level   (MGI Ref ID J:56081)
        • increased circulating ketone body level
          • plasma beta hydroxybutyrate levels are increased   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
        • increased fatty acid level
          • higher fasting levels of nonesterified free fatty acids   (MGI Ref ID J:56081)
      • decreased circulating glucose level
        • lower fasting glucose levels   (MGI Ref ID J:56081)
      • decreased glycogen level
        • decrease in glycogen levels in the heart   (MGI Ref ID J:83611)
    • altered response to myocardial infarction
      • exhibit a significant reduction in tolerance to ischemia; cardiac output is significantly lower and end-diastolic pressure is significantly higher after ischemia, regardless of whether the perfusate is with or without fatty acids, compared to controls   (MGI Ref ID J:83611)
      • survival of hearts is lower (53%) than that of wild-type (80%) after a 6-min ischemic insult   (MGI Ref ID J:83611)
      • recovery after ischemia is similar to controls in another study which also saw no adverse effect on survival   (MGI Ref ID J:112746)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • abnormal cardiovascular system physiology
    • heart exhibits a significant decrease in palmitate oxidation and ATP levels, however cardiac output and end-diastolic pressure is normal under nonischemic conditions   (MGI Ref ID J:83611)
    • lower palmitate oxidation rates relative to controls offset by increased glucose oxidation levels with normal ATP production in another study   (MGI Ref ID J:112746)
    • cardiac work in non-ischemic hearts elevated relative to controls in another study   (MGI Ref ID J:112746)
    • abnormal cardiac cell glucose uptake
      • increase in glucose uptake in the heart   (MGI Ref ID J:83611)
    • altered response to myocardial infarction
      • exhibit a significant reduction in tolerance to ischemia; cardiac output is significantly lower and end-diastolic pressure is significantly higher after ischemia, regardless of whether the perfusate is with or without fatty acids, compared to controls   (MGI Ref ID J:83611)
      • survival of hearts is lower (53%) than that of wild-type (80%) after a 6-min ischemic insult   (MGI Ref ID J:83611)
      • recovery after ischemia is similar to controls in another study which also saw no adverse effect on survival   (MGI Ref ID J:112746)
  • cardiac hypertrophy
    • increase in the heart/body weight ratio, although exhibit no significant differences in body and heart weights   (MGI Ref ID J:83611)
  • muscle phenotype
  • abnormal cardiac cell glucose uptake
    • increase in glucose uptake in the heart   (MGI Ref ID J:83611)
  • growth/size/body phenotype
  • decreased body size
    • body size smaller than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
    • weight difference from controls significant after 12 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
    • slow postnatal weight gain
      • gain less weight than controls   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
      • weight difference from controls significant after 12 weeks of age   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
  • decreased percent body fat
    • total body fat about 38% lower than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
    • lean mass normal   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
  • digestive/alimentary phenotype
  • abnormal intestinal absorption   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
    • abnormal glucose absorption
      • increased glucose uptake rate in the first third of the small intestine   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
    • abnormal intestinal lipid absorption
      • 50% reduction in oleic acid uptake in the first third of the small intestine   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
      • also reduced uptake in the middle third but not in the distal third   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
      • reduced incorporation of fatty acids into triglycerides in the first third of the small intestine   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
      • decreased secretion of newly synthesized triglycerides in the first third but not the remainder of the small intestine   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
      • decreased intestinal cholesterol absorption
        • more cholesterol retained in the intestinal lumen   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
        • 50% reduction in cholesterol output to lymph   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
        • cholesterol uptake in the first third of the small intestine is reduced more than 60%   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
        • no defect in cholesterol uptake in the distal two-thirds of the small intestine   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
  • abnormal small intestine morphology
    • small intestine is longer than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:123605)
  • adipose tissue phenotype
  • abnormal fat pad morphology
    • epididymal fat pads weigh less than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
  • decreased percent body fat
    • total body fat about 38% lower than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
    • lean mass normal   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
  • skeleton phenotype
  • decreased bone mass
    • significantly reduced bone mass   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
  • behavior/neurological phenotype
  • abnormal food intake
    • food intake reduced 20%   (MGI Ref ID J:126461)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal cardiac cell glucose uptake
    • increase in glucose uptake in the heart   (MGI Ref ID J:83611)

Cd36tm1Mfe/Cd36tm1Mfe

        involves: 129S1/Sv
  • nervous system phenotype
  • abnormal myelination
    • more thinly myelinated fibers are found at 3 and 6 weeks after sciatic nerve crush injury than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:89664)
    • myelinated fibers with decreased diameters   (MGI Ref ID J:89664)
  • abnormal peripheral nervous system regeneration
    • more thinly myelinated fibers are found at 3 and 6 weeks after sciatic nerve crush injury than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:89664)
    • myelinated fibers with decreased diameters   (MGI Ref ID J:89664)
    • more macrophage present   (MGI Ref ID J:89664)
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal macrophage chemotaxis
    • more macrophage present at 3 and 6 weeks after sciatic nerve crush injury than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:89664)
  • cardiovascular system phenotype
  • abnormal blood pressure regulation
    • resting coronary resistance is lower than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:109739)
    • hexarelin fails to induce a dose dependent increase in coronary perfusion pressure as it does in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:109739)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal macrophage chemotaxis
    • more macrophage present at 3 and 6 weeks after sciatic nerve crush injury than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:89664)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal macrophage chemotaxis
    • more macrophage present at 3 and 6 weeks after sciatic nerve crush injury than in controls   (MGI Ref ID J:89664)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Cardiovascular Research
Hypercholesterolemia
Hypotension

Diabetes and Obesity Research
Hypoglycemia

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research

Metabolism Research
Lipid Metabolism

Neurobiology Research
Behavioral and Learning Defects
Myelination Defects

Research Tools
Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research

Sensorineural Research
Taste Defects

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Cd36tm1Mfe
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Maria Febbraio
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Common Name(s) CD36 KO; CD36KO; Cd36-; FAT/CD36-;
Mutation Made By Maria Febbraio,   Cleveland Clinic
Strain of Origin129S1/Sv-Oca2<+> Tyr<+> Kitl<+>
Gene Symbol and Name Cd36, CD36 antigen
Chromosome 5
Gene Common Name(s) BDPLT10; CHDS7; FAT; GP3B; GP4; GPIV; PASIV; SCARB3; fatty acid translocase;
Molecular Note A neomycin cassette replaced a 1kb fragment including the transcription start site. [MGI Ref ID J:56081]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Cd36tm1Mfe, Standard PCR
Cd36tm1Mfe, Separated PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Additional References

Cd36tm1Mfe related

Almeida PE; Roque NR; Magalhaes KG; Mattos KA; Teixeira L; Maya-Monteiro C; Almeida CJ; Castro-Faria-Neto HC; Ryffel B; Quesniaux VF; Bozza PT. 2014. Differential TLR2 downstream signaling regulates lipid metabolism and cytokine production triggered by Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection. Biochim Biophys Acta 1841(1):97-107. [PubMed: 24120921]  [MGI Ref ID J:210048]

Anidi IU; Servinsky LE; Rentsendorj O; Stephens RS; Scott AL; Pearse DB. 2013. CD36 and Fyn kinase mediate malaria-induced lung endothelial barrier dysfunction in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei. PLoS One 8(8):e71010. [PubMed: 23967147]  [MGI Ref ID J:206356]

Belz GT; Vremec D; Febbraio M; Corcoran L; Shortman K; Carbone FR; Heath WR. 2002. CD36 is differentially expressed by CD8+ splenic dendritic cells but is not required for cross-presentation in vivo. J Immunol 168(12):6066-70. [PubMed: 12055215]  [MGI Ref ID J:123014]

Benton CR; Han XX; Febbraio M; Graham TE; Bonen A. 2006. Inverse relationship between PGC-1alpha protein expression and triacylglycerol accumulation in rodent skeletal muscle. J Appl Physiol 100(2):377-83. [PubMed: 16223979]  [MGI Ref ID J:135780]

Bharadwaj KG; Hiyama Y; Hu Y; Huggins LA; Ramakrishnan R; Abumrad NA; Shulman GI; Blaner WS; Goldberg IJ. 2010. Chylomicron- and VLDL-derived lipids enter the heart through different pathways: in vivo evidence for receptor- and non-receptor-mediated fatty acid uptake. J Biol Chem 285(49):37976-86. [PubMed: 20852327]  [MGI Ref ID J:167341]

Bodart V; Febbraio M; Demers A; McNicoll N; Pohankova P; Perreault A; Sejlitz T; Escher E; Silverstein RL; Lamontagne D; Ong H. 2002. CD36 mediates the cardiovascular action of growth hormone-releasing peptides in the heart. Circ Res 90(8):844-9. [PubMed: 11988484]  [MGI Ref ID J:109739]

Bonen A; Han XX; Habets DD; Febbraio M; Glatz JF; Luiken JJ. 2007. A null mutation in skeletal muscle FAT/CD36 reveals its essential role in insulin- and AICAR-stimulated fatty acid metabolism. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 292(6):E1740-9. [PubMed: 17264223]  [MGI Ref ID J:121906]

Boyanovsky B; Zack M; Forrest K; Webb NR. 2009. The capacity of group V sPLA2 to increase atherogenicity of ApoE-/- and LDLR-/- mouse LDL in vitro predicts its atherogenic role in vivo. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 29(4):532-8. [PubMed: 19164803]  [MGI Ref ID J:159779]

Boyanovsky BB; van der Westhuyzen DR; Webb NR. 2005. Group V secretory phospholipase A2-modified low density lipoprotein promotes foam cell formation by a SR-A- and CD36-independent process that involves cellular proteoglycans. J Biol Chem 280(38):32746-52. [PubMed: 16040605]  [MGI Ref ID J:102157]

Brinkmann JF; Abumrad NA; Ibrahimi A; Van Der Vusse GJ; Glatz JF. 2002. New insights into long-chain fatty acid uptake by heart muscle: a crucial role for fatty acid translocase/CD36. Biochem J 367(Pt 3):561-70. [PubMed: 12088505]  [MGI Ref ID J:79986]

Castellani LW; Gargalovic P; Febbraio M; Charugundla S; Jien ML; Lusis AJ. 2004. Mechanisms mediating insulin resistance in transgenic mice overexpressing mouse apolipoprotein A-II. J Lipid Res 45(12):2377-87. [PubMed: 15466364]  [MGI Ref ID J:94141]

Chen JL; Lu XJ; Zou KL; Ye K. 2014. Kruppel-like factor 2 promotes liver steatosis through upregulation of CD36. J Lipid Res 55(1):32-40. [PubMed: 23861552]  [MGI Ref ID J:203965]

Cho S; Park EM; Febbraio M; Anrather J; Park L; Racchumi G; Silverstein RL; Iadecola C. 2005. The class B scavenger receptor CD36 mediates free radical production and tissue injury in cerebral ischemia. J Neurosci 25(10):2504-12. [PubMed: 15758158]  [MGI Ref ID J:98618]

Cho S; Szeto HH; Kim E; Kim H; Tolhurst AT; Pinto JT. 2007. A novel cell-permeable antioxidant peptide, SS31, attenuates ischemic brain injury by down-regulating CD36. J Biol Chem 282(7):4634-42. [PubMed: 17178711]  [MGI Ref ID J:120921]

Christiaens V; Van Hul M; Lijnen HR; Scroyen I. 2012. CD36 promotes adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis. Biochim Biophys Acta 1820(7):949-56. [PubMed: 22507268]  [MGI Ref ID J:185144]

Chung EY; Liu J; Homma Y; Zhang Y; Brendolan A; Saggese M; Han J; Silverstein R; Selleri L; Ma X. 2007. Interleukin-10 expression in macrophages during phagocytosis of apoptotic cells is mediated by homeodomain proteins Pbx1 and Prep-1. Immunity 27(6):952-64. [PubMed: 18093541]  [MGI Ref ID J:129168]

Clugston RD; Yuen JJ; Hu Y; Abumrad NA; Berk PD; Goldberg IJ; Blaner WS; Huang LS. 2014. CD36-deficient mice are resistant to alcohol- and high-carbohydrate-induced hepatic steatosis. J Lipid Res 55(2):239-46. [PubMed: 24280415]  [MGI Ref ID J:208290]

Coburn CT; Knapp FF Jr; Febbraio M; Beets AL; Silverstein RL; Abumrad NA. 2000. Defective uptake and utilization of long chain fatty acids in muscle and adipose tissues of CD36 knockout mice J Biol Chem 275(42):32523-9. [PubMed: 10913136]  [MGI Ref ID J:65189]

Court N; Vasseur V; Vacher R; Fremond C; Shebzukhov Y; Yeremeev VV; Maillet I; Nedospasov SA; Gordon S; Fallon PG; Suzuki H; Ryffel B; Quesniaux VF. 2010. Partial redundancy of the pattern recognition receptors, scavenger receptors, and C-type lectins for the long-term control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. J Immunol 184(12):7057-70. [PubMed: 20488784]  [MGI Ref ID J:161134]

Das R; Ganapathy S; Mahabeleshwar GH; Drumm C; Febbraio M; Jain MK; Plow EF. 2013. Macrophage gene expression and foam cell formation are regulated by plasminogen. Circulation 127(11):1209-18, e1-16. [PubMed: 23401155]  [MGI Ref ID J:210423]

DeFilippis RA; Chang H; Dumont N; Rabban JT; Chen YY; Fontenay GV; Berman HK; Gauthier ML; Zhao J; Hu D; Marx JJ; Tjoe JA; Ziv E; Febbraio M; Kerlikowske K; Parvin B; Tlsty TD. 2012. CD36 repression activates a multicellular stromal program shared by high mammographic density and tumor tissues. Cancer Discov 2(9):826-39. [PubMed: 22777768]  [MGI Ref ID J:193158]

Densupsoontorn N; Carpentier YA; Racine R; Murray FM; Seo T; Ramakrishnan R; Deckelbaum RJ. 2008. CD36 and proteoglycan-mediated pathways for (n-3) fatty acid enriched triglyceride-rich particle blood clearance in mouse models in vivo and in peritoneal macrophages in vitro. J Nutr 138(2):257-61. [PubMed: 18203888]  [MGI Ref ID J:133410]

Drover VA; Ajmal M; Nassir F; Davidson NO; Nauli AM; Sahoo D; Tso P; Abumrad NA. 2005. CD36 deficiency impairs intestinal lipid secretion and clearance of chylomicrons from the blood. J Clin Invest 115(5):1290-1297. [PubMed: 15841205]  [MGI Ref ID J:98095]

Drover VA; Nguyen DV; Bastie CC; Darlington YF; Abumrad NA; Pessin JE; London E; Sahoo D; Phillips MC. 2008. CD36 mediates both cellular uptake of very long chain fatty acids and their intestinal absorption in mice. J Biol Chem 283(19):13108-15. [PubMed: 18332148]  [MGI Ref ID J:137082]

Erdman LK; Cosio G; Helmers AJ; Gowda DC; Grinstein S; Kain KC. 2009. CD36 and TLR interactions in inflammation and phagocytosis: implications for malaria. J Immunol 183(10):6452-9. [PubMed: 19864601]  [MGI Ref ID J:157175]

Eto M; Yoshikawa H; Fujimura H; Naba I; Sumi-Akamaru H; Takayasu S; Itabe H; Sakoda S. 2003. The role of CD36 in peripheral nerve remyelination after crush injury. Eur J Neurosci 17(12):2659-66. [PubMed: 12823473]  [MGI Ref ID J:89664]

Febbraio M; Abumrad NA; Hajjar DP; Sharma K; Cheng W; Pearce SF ; Silverstein RL. 1999. A null mutation in murine CD36 reveals an important role in fatty acid and lipoprotein metabolism. J Biol Chem 274(27):19055-62. [PubMed: 10383407]  [MGI Ref ID J:56081]

Febbraio M; Podrez EA; Smith JD; Hajjar DP; Hazen SL; Hoff HF; Sharma K; Silverstein RL. 2000. Targeted disruption of the class B scavenger receptor CD36 protects against atherosclerotic lesion development in mice [see comments] J Clin Invest 105(8):1049-56. [PubMed: 10772649]  [MGI Ref ID J:61672]

Ghosh A; Li W; Febbraio M; Espinola RG; McCrae KR; Cockrell E; Silverstein RL. 2008. Platelet CD36 mediates interactions with endothelial cell-derived microparticles and contributes to thrombosis in mice. J Clin Invest 118(5):1934-43. [PubMed: 18431509]  [MGI Ref ID J:136325]

Goudriaan JR; Dahlmans VE; Teusink B; Ouwens DM; Febbraio M; Maassen JA; Romijn JA; Havekes LM; Voshol PJ. 2003. CD36 deficiency increases insulin sensitivity in muscle, but induces insulin resistance in the liver in mice. J Lipid Res 44(12):2270-7. [PubMed: 12923231]  [MGI Ref ID J:87372]

Goudriaan JR; den Boer MA; Rensen PC; Febbraio M; Kuipers F; Romijn JA; Havekes LM; Voshol PJ. 2005. CD36 deficiency in mice impairs lipoprotein lipase-mediated triglyceride clearance. J Lipid Res 46(10):2175-81. [PubMed: 16024917]  [MGI Ref ID J:104720]

Gowda NM; Wu X; Kumar S; Febbraio M; Gowda DC. 2013. CD36 contributes to malaria parasite-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and NK and T cell activation by dendritic cells. PLoS One 8(10):e77604. [PubMed: 24204889]  [MGI Ref ID J:209171]

Greenberg ME; Sun M; Zhang R; Febbraio M; Silverstein R; Hazen SL. 2006. Oxidized phosphatidylserine-CD36 interactions play an essential role in macrophage-dependent phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. J Exp Med 203(12):2613-25. [PubMed: 17101731]  [MGI Ref ID J:124620]

Habets DD; Coumans WA; Voshol PJ; den Boer MA; Febbraio M; Bonen A; Glatz JF; Luiken JJ. 2007. AMPK-mediated increase in myocardial long-chain fatty acid uptake critically depends on sarcolemmal CD36. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 355(1):204-10. [PubMed: 17292863]  [MGI Ref ID J:118635]

Hajri T; Hall AM; Jensen DR; Pietka TA; Drover VA; Tao H; Eckel R; Abumrad NA. 2007. CD36-facilitated fatty acid uptake inhibits leptin production and signaling in adipose tissue. Diabetes 56(7):1872-80. [PubMed: 17440173]  [MGI Ref ID J:126461]

Hajri T; Han XX; Bonen A; Abumrad NA. 2002. Defective fatty acid uptake modulates insulin responsiveness and metabolic responses to diet in CD36-null mice. J Clin Invest 109(10):1381-9. [PubMed: 12021254]  [MGI Ref ID J:76646]

Hale JS; Li M; Sinyuk M; Jahnen-Dechent W; Lathia JD; Silverstein RL. 2012. Context dependent role of the CD36--thrombospondin--histidine-rich glycoprotein axis in tumor angiogenesis and growth. PLoS One 7(7):e40033. [PubMed: 22808089]  [MGI Ref ID J:189632]

Hamilton RF Jr; Thakur SA; Mayfair JK; Holian A. 2006. MARCO mediates silica uptake and toxicity in alveolar macrophages from C57BL/6 mice. J Biol Chem 281(45):34218-26. [PubMed: 16984918]  [MGI Ref ID J:117252]

Hoebe K; Georgel P; Rutschmann S; Du X; Mudd S; Crozat K; Sovath S; Shamel L; Hartung T; Zahringer U; Beutler B. 2005. CD36 is a sensor of diacylglycerides. Nature 433(7025):523-7. [PubMed: 15690042]  [MGI Ref ID J:96018]

Holloway GP; Jain SS; Bezaire V; Han XX; Glatz JF; Luiken JJ; Harper ME; Bonen A. 2009. FAT/CD36-null mice reveal that mitochondrial FAT/CD36 is required to upregulate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in contracting muscle. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 297(4):R960-7. [PubMed: 19625692]  [MGI Ref ID J:152807]

Huang W; Febbraio M; Silverstein RL. 2011. CD9 tetraspanin interacts with CD36 on the surface of macrophages: a possible regulatory influence on uptake of oxidized low density lipoprotein. PLoS One 6(12):e29092. [PubMed: 22216174]  [MGI Ref ID J:182334]

Irie H; Krukenkamp IB; Brinkmann JF; Gaudette GR; Saltman AE; Jou W; Glatz JF; Abumrad NA; Ibrahimi A. 2003. Myocardial recovery from ischemia is impaired in CD36-null mice and restored by myocyte CD36 expression or medium-chain fatty acids. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100(11):6819-24. [PubMed: 12746501]  [MGI Ref ID J:83611]

Isenberg JS; Romeo MJ; Abu-Asab M; Tsokos M; Oldenborg A; Pappan L; Wink DA; Frazier WA; Roberts DD. 2007. Increasing survival of ischemic tissue by targeting CD47. Circ Res 100(5):712-20. [PubMed: 17293482]  [MGI Ref ID J:133700]

Kennedy DJ; Kuchibhotla S; Westfall KM; Silverstein RL; Morton RE; Febbraio M. 2011. A CD36-dependent pathway enhances macrophage and adipose tissue inflammation and impairs insulin signalling. Cardiovasc Res 89(3):604-13. [PubMed: 21088116]  [MGI Ref ID J:186882]

Kennedy DJ; Kuchibhotla SD; Guy E; Park YM; Nimako G; Vanegas D; Morton RE; Febbraio M. 2009. Dietary cholesterol plays a role in CD36-mediated atherogenesis in LDLR-knockout mice. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 29(10):1481-7. [PubMed: 19608973]  [MGI Ref ID J:167807]

Kermorvant-Duchemin E; Sennlaub F; Sirinyan M; Brault S; Andelfinger G; Kooli A; Germain S; Ong H; d'Orleans-Juste P; Gobeil F; Zhu T; Boisvert C; Hardy P; Jain K; Falck JR; Balazy M; Chemtob S. 2005. Trans-arachidonic acids generated during nitrative stress induce a thrombospondin-1-dependent microvascular degeneration. Nat Med 11(12):1339-45. [PubMed: 16311602]  [MGI Ref ID J:104131]

Kevorkova O; Martineau C; Martin-Falstrault L; Sanchez-Dardon J; Brissette L; Moreau R. 2013. Low-bone-mass phenotype of deficient mice for the cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). PLoS One 8(10):e77701. [PubMed: 24204923]  [MGI Ref ID J:209167]

Kim E; Tolhurst AT; Qin LY; Chen XY; Febbraio M; Cho S. 2008. CD36/fatty acid translocase, an inflammatory mediator, is involved in hyperlipidemia-induced exacerbation in ischemic brain injury. J Neurosci 28(18):4661-70. [PubMed: 18448643]  [MGI Ref ID J:134972]

Kincer JF; Uittenbogaard A; Dressman J; Guerin TM; Febbraio M; Guo L; Smart EJ. 2002. Hypercholesterolemia promotes a CD36-dependent and endothelial nitric-oxide synthase-mediated vascular dysfunction. J Biol Chem 277(26):23525-33. [PubMed: 11976335]  [MGI Ref ID J:77672]

King KL; Stanley WC; Rosca M; Kerner J; Hoppel CL; Febbraio M. 2007. Fatty acid oxidation in cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondria is unaffected by deletion of CD36. Arch Biochem Biophys 467(2):234-8. [PubMed: 17904092]  [MGI Ref ID J:132421]

Koonen DP; Febbraio M; Bonnet S; Nagendran J; Young ME; Michelakis ED; Dyck JR. 2007. CD36 expression contributes to age-induced cardiomyopathy in mice. Circulation 116(19):2139-47. [PubMed: 17967771]  [MGI Ref ID J:142995]

Koonen DP; Jacobs RL; Febbraio M; Young ME; Soltys CL; Ong H; Vance DE; Dyck JR. 2007. Increased hepatic CD36 expression contributes to dyslipidemia associated with diet-induced obesity. Diabetes 56(12):2863-71. [PubMed: 17728375]  [MGI Ref ID J:132322]

Koonen DP; Sung MM; Kao CK; Dolinsky VW; Koves TR; Ilkayeva O; Jacobs RL; Vance DE; Light PE; Muoio DM; Febbraio M; Dyck JR. 2010. Alterations in skeletal muscle fatty acid handling predisposes middle-aged mice to diet-induced insulin resistance. Diabetes 59(6):1366-75. [PubMed: 20299464]  [MGI Ref ID J:169362]

Korporaal SJ; Van Eck M; Adelmeijer J; Ijsseldijk M; Out R; Lisman T; Lenting PJ; Van Berkel TJ; Akkerman JW. 2007. Platelet activation by oxidized low density lipoprotein is mediated by CD36 and scavenger receptor-A. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 27(11):2476-83. [PubMed: 17761940]  [MGI Ref ID J:135004]

Kuang M; Febbraio M; Wagg C; Lopaschuk GD; Dyck JR. 2004. Fatty acid translocase/CD36 deficiency does not energetically or functionally compromise hearts before or after ischemia. Circulation 109(12):1550-7. [PubMed: 15023869]  [MGI Ref ID J:112746]

Kunjathoor VV; Febbraio M; Podrez EA; Moore KJ; Andersson L; Koehn S; Rhee JS; Silverstein R; Hoff HF; Freeman MW. 2002. Scavenger receptors class A-I/II and CD36 are the principal receptors responsible for the uptake of modified low density lipoprotein leading to lipid loading in macrophages. J Biol Chem 277(51):49982-8. [PubMed: 12376530]  [MGI Ref ID J:80905]

Kunz A; Abe T; Hochrainer K; Shimamura M; Anrather J; Racchumi G; Zhou P; Iadecola C. 2008. Nuclear factor-kappaB activation and postischemic inflammation are suppressed in CD36-null mice after middle cerebral artery occlusion. J Neurosci 28(7):1649-58. [PubMed: 18272685]  [MGI Ref ID J:132279]

Kurokawa J; Arai S; Nakashima K; Nagano H; Nishijima A; Miyata K; Ose R; Mori M; Kubota N; Kadowaki T; Oike Y; Koga H; Febbraio M; Iwanaga T; Miyazaki T. 2010. Macrophage-derived AIM is endocytosed into adipocytes and decreases lipid droplets via inhibition of fatty acid synthase activity. Cell Metab 11(6):479-92. [PubMed: 20519120]  [MGI Ref ID J:160912]

Laugerette F; Passilly-Degrace P; Patris B; Niot I; Febbraio M; Montmayeur JP; Besnard P. 2005. CD36 involvement in orosensory detection of dietary lipids, spontaneous fat preference, and digestive secretions. J Clin Invest 115(11):3177-3184. [PubMed: 16276419]  [MGI Ref ID J:102503]

Le Foll C; Dunn-Meynell A; Musatov S; Magnan C; Levin BE. 2013. FAT/CD36: a major regulator of neuronal fatty acid sensing and energy homeostasis in rats and mice. Diabetes 62(8):2709-16. [PubMed: 23557700]  [MGI Ref ID J:208972]

Li W; Febbraio M; Reddy SP; Yu DY; Yamamoto M; Silverstein RL. 2010. CD36 participates in a signaling pathway that regulates ROS formation in murine VSMCs. J Clin Invest 120(11):3996-4006. [PubMed: 20978343]  [MGI Ref ID J:166919]

Lim H; Kim YU; Sun H; Lee JH; Reynolds JM; Hanabuchi S; Wu H; Teng BB; Chung Y. 2014. Proatherogenic conditions promote autoimmune T helper 17 cell responses in vivo. Immunity 40(1):153-65. [PubMed: 24412615]  [MGI Ref ID J:209392]

Lovegrove FE; Gharib SA; Pena-Castillo L; Patel SN; Ruzinski JT; Hughes TR; Liles WC; Kain KC. 2008. Parasite burden and CD36-mediated sequestration are determinants of acute lung injury in an experimental malaria model. PLoS Pathog 4(5):e1000068. [PubMed: 18483551]  [MGI Ref ID J:193591]

Luangrath V; Brodeur MR; Rhainds D; Brissette L. 2008. Mouse CD36 has opposite effects on LDL and oxidized LDL metabolism in vivo. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 28(7):1290-5. [PubMed: 18436808]  [MGI Ref ID J:159812]

Manning-Tobin JJ; Moore KJ; Seimon TA; Bell SA; Sharuk M; Alvarez-Leite JI; de Winther MP; Tabas I; Freeman MW. 2009. Loss of SR-A and CD36 activity reduces atherosclerotic lesion complexity without abrogating foam cell formation in hyperlipidemic mice. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 29(1):19-26. [PubMed: 18948635]  [MGI Ref ID J:159787]

Martin C; Passilly-Degrace P; Chevrot M; Ancel D; Sparks SM; Drucker DJ; Besnard P. 2012. Lipid-mediated release of GLP-1 by mouse taste buds from circumvallate papillae: putative involvement of GPR120 and impact on taste sensitivity. J Lipid Res 53(11):2256-65. [PubMed: 22904345]  [MGI Ref ID J:190563]

Martin C; Passilly-Degrace P; Gaillard D; Merlin JF; Chevrot M; Besnard P. 2011. The Lipid-Sensor Candidates CD36 and GPR120 Are Differentially Regulated by Dietary Lipids in Mouse Taste Buds: Impact on Spontaneous Fat Preference. PLoS One 6(8):e24014. [PubMed: 21901153]  [MGI Ref ID J:176136]

McFarlan JT; Yoshida Y; Jain SS; Han XX; Snook LA; Lally J; Smith BK; Glatz JF; Luiken JJ; Sayer RA; Tupling AR; Chabowski A; Holloway GP; Bonen A. 2012. In vivo, fatty acid translocase (CD36) critically regulates skeletal muscle fuel selection, exercise performance, and training-induced adaptation of fatty acid oxidation. J Biol Chem 287(28):23502-16. [PubMed: 22584574]  [MGI Ref ID J:188374]

Montano EN; Boullier A; Almazan F; Binder CJ; Witztum JL; Hartvigsen K. 2013. Development and application of a nonradioactive binding assay of oxidized low-density lipoprotein to macrophage scavenger receptors. J Lipid Res 54(11):3206-14. [PubMed: 23997238]  [MGI Ref ID J:203430]

Moore KJ; Kunjathoor VV; Koehn SL; Manning JJ; Tseng AA; Silver JM; McKee M; Freeman MW. 2005. Loss of receptor-mediated lipid uptake via scavenger receptor A or CD36 pathways does not ameliorate atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice. J Clin Invest 115(8):2192-201. [PubMed: 16075060]  [MGI Ref ID J:100226]

Nassir F; Adewole OL; Brunt EM; Abumrad NA. 2013. CD36 deletion reduces VLDL secretion, modulates liver prostaglandins, and exacerbates hepatic steatosis in ob/ob mice. J Lipid Res 54(11):2988-97. [PubMed: 23964120]  [MGI Ref ID J:203442]

Nassir F; Wilson B; Han X; Gross RW; Abumrad NA. 2007. CD36 is important for fatty acid and cholesterol uptake by the proximal but not distal intestine. J Biol Chem 282(27):19493-501. [PubMed: 17507371]  [MGI Ref ID J:123605]

Nauli AM; Nassir F; Zheng S; Yang Q; Lo CM; Vonlehmden SB; Lee D; Jandacek RJ; Abumrad NA; Tso P. 2006. CD36 is important for chylomicron formation and secretion and may mediate cholesterol uptake in the proximal intestine. Gastroenterology 131(4):1197-207. [PubMed: 17030189]  [MGI Ref ID J:124955]

Nguyen DV; Drover VA; Knopfel M; Dhanasekaran P; Hauser H; Phillips MC. 2009. Influence of class B scavenger receptors on cholesterol flux across the brush border membrane and intestinal absorption. J Lipid Res 50(11):2235-44. [PubMed: 19454765]  [MGI Ref ID J:154959]

Nicholls HT; Kowalski G; Kennedy DJ; Risis S; Zaffino LA; Watson N; Kanellakis P; Watt MJ; Bobik A; Bonen A; Febbraio M; Lancaster GI; Febbraio MA. 2011. Hematopoietic cell-restricted deletion of CD36 reduces high-fat diet-induced macrophage infiltration and improves insulin signaling in adipose tissue. Diabetes 60(4):1100-10. [PubMed: 21378177]  [MGI Ref ID J:171750]

O'Byrne SM; Kako Y; Deckelbaum RJ; Hansen IH; Palczewski K; Goldberg IJ; Blaner WS. 2010. Multiple pathways ensure retinoid delivery to milk: studies in genetically modified mice. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 298(4):E862-70. [PubMed: 20040693]  [MGI Ref ID J:162896]

Panigrahi S; Ma Y; Hong L; Gao D; West XZ; Salomon RG; Byzova TV; Podrez EA. 2013. Engagement of platelet toll-like receptor 9 by novel endogenous ligands promotes platelet hyperreactivity and thrombosis. Circ Res 112(1):103-12. [PubMed: 23071157]  [MGI Ref ID J:212876]

Park L; Wang G; Zhou P; Zhou J; Pitstick R; Previti ML; Younkin L; Younkin SG; Van Nostrand WE; Cho S; Anrather J; Carlson GA; Iadecola C. 2011. Scavenger receptor CD36 is essential for the cerebrovascular oxidative stress and neurovascular dysfunction induced by amyloid-{beta}. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108(12):5063-8. [PubMed: 21383152]  [MGI Ref ID J:170096]

Park L; Zhou J; Zhou P; Pistick R; El Jamal S; Younkin L; Pierce J; Arreguin A; Anrather J; Younkin SG; Carlson GA; McEwen BS; Iadecola C. 2013. Innate immunity receptor CD36 promotes cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110(8):3089-94. [PubMed: 23382216]  [MGI Ref ID J:194544]

Park YM; Febbraio M; Silverstein RL. 2009. CD36 modulates migration of mouse and human macrophages in response to oxidized LDL and may contribute to macrophage trapping in the arterial intima. J Clin Invest 119(1):136-45. [PubMed: 19065049]  [MGI Ref ID J:144714]

Parks BW; Black LL; Zimmerman KA; Metz AE; Steele C; Murphy-Ullrich JE; Kabarowski JH. 2013. CD36, but not G2A, modulates efferocytosis, inflammation, and fibrosis following bleomycin-induced lung injury. J Lipid Res 54(4):1114-23. [PubMed: 23393303]  [MGI Ref ID J:195150]

Patel SN; Lu Z; Ayi K; Serghides L; Gowda DC; Kain KC. 2007. Disruption of CD36 impairs cytokine response to Plasmodium falciparum glycosylphosphatidylinositol and confers susceptibility to severe and fatal malaria in vivo. J Immunol 178(6):3954-61. [PubMed: 17339496]  [MGI Ref ID J:144269]

Pietka TA; Sulkin MS; Kuda O; Wang W; Zhou D; Yamada KA; Yang K; Su X; Gross RW; Nerbonne JM; Efimov IR; Abumrad NA. 2012. CD36 protein influences myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis and phospholipid metabolism: conduction anomalies in CD36-deficient mice during fasting. J Biol Chem 287(46):38901-12. [PubMed: 23019328]  [MGI Ref ID J:192639]

Podrez EA; Byzova TV; Febbraio M; Salomon RG; Ma Y; Valiyaveettil M; Poliakov E; Sun M; Finton PJ; Curtis BR; Chen J; Zhang R; Silverstein RL; Hazen SL. 2007. Platelet CD36 links hyperlipidemia, oxidant stress and a prothrombotic phenotype. Nat Med 13(9):1086-95. [PubMed: 17721545]  [MGI Ref ID J:125153]

Qin L; Kim E; Ratan R; Lee FS; Cho S. 2011. Genetic variant of BDNF (Val66Met) polymorphism attenuates stroke-induced angiogenic responses by enhancing anti-angiogenic mediator CD36 expression. J Neurosci 31(2):775-83. [PubMed: 21228186]  [MGI Ref ID J:180834]

Rahaman SO; Lennon DJ; Febbraio M; Podrez EA; Hazen SL; Silverstein RL. 2006. A CD36-dependent signaling cascade is necessary for macrophage foam cell formation. Cell Metab 4(3):211-21. [PubMed: 16950138]  [MGI Ref ID J:129743]

Rahaman SO; Swat W; Febbraio M; Silverstein RL. 2011. Vav family Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors regulate CD36-mediated macrophage foam cell formation. J Biol Chem 286(9):7010-7. [PubMed: 21209086]  [MGI Ref ID J:170538]

Robertson S; Colombo ES; Lucas SN; Hall PR; Febbraio M; Paffett ML; Campen MJ. 2013. CD36 mediates endothelial dysfunction downstream of circulating factors induced by O3 exposure. Toxicol Sci 134(2):304-11. [PubMed: 23650127]  [MGI Ref ID J:206892]

Schulz O; Pennington DJ; Hodivala-Dilke K; Febbraio M; Reis e Sousa C. 2002. CD36 or alphavbeta3 and alphavbeta5 integrins are not essential for MHC class I cross-presentation of cell-associated antigen by CD8 alpha+ murine dendritic cells. J Immunol 168(12):6057-65. [PubMed: 12055214]  [MGI Ref ID J:123797]

Sclafani A; Ackroff K; Abumrad NA. 2007. CD36 gene deletion reduces fat preference and intake but not post-oral fat conditioning in mice. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 293(5):R1823-32. [PubMed: 17804586]  [MGI Ref ID J:126806]

Seimon TA; Nadolski MJ; Liao X; Magallon J; Nguyen M; Feric NT; Koschinsky ML; Harkewicz R; Witztum JL; Tsimikas S; Golenbock D; Moore KJ; Tabas I. 2010. Atherogenic lipids and lipoproteins trigger CD36-TLR2-dependent apoptosis in macrophages undergoing endoplasmic reticulum stress. Cell Metab 12(5):467-82. [PubMed: 21035758]  [MGI Ref ID J:167910]

Sharif O; Matt U; Saluzzo S; Lakovits K; Haslinger I; Furtner T; Doninger B; Knapp S. 2013. The scavenger receptor CD36 downmodulates the early inflammatory response while enhancing bacterial phagocytosis during pneumococcal pneumonia. J Immunol 190(11):5640-8. [PubMed: 23610144]  [MGI Ref ID J:204784]

Sheedy FJ; Grebe A; Rayner KJ; Kalantari P; Ramkhelawon B; Carpenter SB; Becker CE; Ediriweera HN; Mullick AE; Golenbock DT; Stuart LM; Latz E; Fitzgerald KA; Moore KJ. 2013. CD36 coordinates NLRP3 inflammasome activation by facilitating intracellular nucleation of soluble ligands into particulate ligands in sterile inflammation. Nat Immunol 14(8):812-20. [PubMed: 23812099]  [MGI Ref ID J:205721]

Siddiqi S; Saleem U; Abumrad NA; Davidson NO; Storch J; Siddiqi SA; Mansbach CM 2nd. 2010. A novel multiprotein complex is required to generate the prechylomicron transport vesicle from intestinal ER. J Lipid Res 51(7):1918-28. [PubMed: 20237389]  [MGI Ref ID J:162827]

Simantov R; Febbraio M; Silverstein RL. 2005. The antiangiogenic effect of thrombospondin-2 is mediated by CD36 and modulated by histidine-rich glycoprotein. Matrix Biol 24(1):27-34. [PubMed: 15748999]  [MGI Ref ID J:96478]

Smith BK; Jain SS; Rimbaud S; Dam A; Quadrilatero J; Ventura-Clapier R; Bonen A; Holloway GP. 2011. FAT/CD36 is located on the outer mitochondrial membrane, upstream of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase, and regulates palmitate oxidation. Biochem J 437(1):125-34. [PubMed: 21463259]  [MGI Ref ID J:173658]

Steinbusch LK; Luiken JJ; Vlasblom R; Chabowski A; Hoebers NT; Coumans WA; Vroegrijk IO; Voshol PJ; Ouwens DM; Glatz JF; Diamant M. 2011. Absence of fatty acid transporter CD36 protects against Western-type diet-related cardiac dysfunction following pressure overload in mice. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 301(4):E618-27. [PubMed: 21712535]  [MGI Ref ID J:182192]

Sundaresan S; Shahid R; Riehl TE; Chandra R; Nassir F; Stenson WF; Liddle RA; Abumrad NA. 2013. CD36-dependent signaling mediates fatty acid-induced gut release of secretin and cholecystokinin. FASEB J 27(3):1191-202. [PubMed: 23233532]  [MGI Ref ID J:197661]

Trent CM; Yu S; Hu Y; Skoller N; Huggins LA; Homma S; Goldberg IJ. 2014. Lipoprotein lipase activity is required for cardiac lipid droplet production. J Lipid Res 55(4):645-58. [PubMed: 24493834]  [MGI Ref ID J:208767]

Wan Z; Matravadia S; Holloway GP; Wright DC. 2013. FAT/CD36 regulates PEPCK expression in adipose tissue. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 304(5):C478-84. [PubMed: 23302781]  [MGI Ref ID J:195083]

Wang JM; Isenberg JS; Billiar TR; Chen AF. 2013. Thrombospondin-1/CD36 pathway contributes to bone marrow-derived angiogenic cell dysfunction in type 1 diabetes via Sonic hedgehog pathway suppression. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 305(12):E1464-72. [PubMed: 24148348]  [MGI Ref ID J:206197]

Wang Y; Fang C; Gao H; Bilodeau ML; Zhang Z; Croce K; Liu S; Morooka T; Sakuma M; Nakajima K; Yoneda S; Shi C; Zidar D; Andre P; Stephens G; Silverstein RL; Hogg N; Schmaier AH; Simon DI. 2014. Platelet-derived S100 family member myeloid-related protein-14 regulates thrombosis. J Clin Invest 124(5):2160-71. [PubMed: 24691441]  [MGI Ref ID J:213163]

West XZ; Malinin NL; Merkulova AA; Tischenko M; Kerr BA; Borden EC; Podrez EA; Salomon RG; Byzova TV. 2010. Oxidative stress induces angiogenesis by activating TLR2 with novel endogenous ligands. Nature 467(7318):972-6. [PubMed: 20927103]  [MGI Ref ID J:165559]

Won WJ; Bachmann MF; Kearney JF. 2008. CD36 is differentially expressed on B cell subsets during development and in responses to antigen. J Immunol 180(1):230-7. [PubMed: 18097024]  [MGI Ref ID J:130897]

Xu ZE; Chen Y; Huang A; Varghese Z; Moorhead JF; Yan F; Powis SH; Li Q; Ruan XZ. 2011. Inflammatory stress exacerbates lipid-mediated renal injury in ApoE/CD36/SRA triple knockout mice. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 301(4):F713-22. [PubMed: 21795641]  [MGI Ref ID J:176272]

Yang J; Sambandam N; Han X; Gross RW; Courtois M; Kovacs A; Febbraio M; Finck BN; Kelly DP. 2007. CD36 deficiency rescues lipotoxic cardiomyopathy. Circ Res 100(8):1208-17. [PubMed: 17363697]  [MGI Ref ID J:135377]

Yoshida Y; Jain SS; McFarlan JT; Snook LA; Chabowski A; Bonen A. 2013. Exercise- and training-induced upregulation of skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation are not solely dependent on mitochondrial machinery and biogenesis. J Physiol 591(Pt 18):4415-26. [PubMed: 22890711]  [MGI Ref ID J:214217]

Yue P; Chen Z; Nassir F; Bernal-Mizrachi C; Finck B; Azhar S; Abumrad NA. 2010. Enhanced hepatic apoA-I secretion and peripheral efflux of cholesterol and phospholipid in CD36 null mice. PLoS One 5(3):e9906. [PubMed: 20360851]  [MGI Ref ID J:158955]

Yvan-Charvet L; Pagler TA; Seimon TA; Thorp E; Welch CL; Witztum JL; Tabas I; Tall AR. 2010. ABCA1 and ABCG1 protect against oxidative stress-induced macrophage apoptosis during efferocytosis. Circ Res 106(12):1861-9. [PubMed: 20431058]  [MGI Ref ID J:175055]

Zhou J; Febbraio M; Wada T; Zhai Y; Kuruba R; He J; Lee JH; Khadem S; Ren S; Li S; Silverstein RL; Xie W. 2008. Hepatic fatty acid transporter Cd36 is a common target of LXR, PXR, and PPARgamma in promoting steatosis. Gastroenterology 134(2):556-67. [PubMed: 18242221]  [MGI Ref ID J:135594]

Zhou MS; Chadipiralla K; Mendez AJ; Jaimes EA; Silverstein RL; Webster K; Raij L. 2013. Nicotine potentiates proatherogenic effects of oxLDL by stimulating and upregulating macrophage CD36 signaling. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 305(4):H563-74. [PubMed: 23748423]  [MGI Ref ID J:202155]

Zhou P; Qian L; Gallo EF; Deeb RS; Anrather J; Gross SS; Iadecola C. 2011. The scavenger receptor CD36 contributes to the neurotoxicity of bone marrow-derived monocytes through peroxynitrite production. Neurobiol Dis 42(3):292-9. [PubMed: 21296664]  [MGI Ref ID J:172773]

Zhu W; Li W; Silverstein RL. 2012. Advanced glycation end products induce a prothrombotic phenotype in mice via interaction with platelet CD36. Blood 119(25):6136-44. [PubMed: 22431576]  [MGI Ref ID J:186736]

Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Animal Health Reports

Room Number           AX18

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryWhen maintaining a live colony, these mice can be bred as homozygotes.
Mating SystemHomozygote x Homozygote         (Female x Male)   31-DEC-13
Diet Information LabDiet® 5K52/5K67

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $199.90Female or MaleHomozygous for Cd36tm1Mfe  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$399.80Homozygous for Cd36tm1Mfe x Homozygous for Cd36tm1Mfe  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $259.90Female or MaleHomozygous for Cd36tm1Mfe  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$519.80Homozygous for Cd36tm1Mfe x Homozygous for Cd36tm1Mfe  

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Repository-Live.
Repository-Live represents an exclusive set of over 1800 unique mouse models across a vast array of research areas. Breeding colonies provide mice for large and small orders and fluctuate in size depending on current research demand. If a strain is not immediately available, you will receive an estimated availability timeframe for your inquiry or order in 2-3 business days. Repository strains typically are delivered at 4 to 8 weeks of age. Requests for specific ages will be noted but not guaranteed and we do not accept age requests for breeder pairs. However, if cohorts of mice (5 or more of one gender) are needed at a specific age range for experiments, we will do our best to accommodate your age request.

Control Information

  Control
   000664 C57BL/6J
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

Payment Terms and Conditions

Terms are granted by individual review and stated on the customer invoice(s) and account statement. These transactions are payable in U.S. currency within the granted terms. Payment for services, products, shipping containers, and shipping costs that are rendered are expected within the payment terms indicated on the invoice or stated by contract. Invoices and account balances in arrears of stated terms may result in The Jackson Laboratory pursuing collection activities including but not limited to outside agencies and court filings.


See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
Ordering Information
JAX® Mice
Surgical and Preconditioning Services
JAX® Services
Customer Services and Support
Tel: 1-800-422-6423 or 1-207-288-5845
Fax: 1-207-288-6150
Technical Support Email Form

Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


For Licensing and Use Restrictions view the link(s) below:
- Strain(s) not available to companies or for-profit entities.

Contact information

General inquiries regarding Terms of Use

Contracts Administration

phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


(6.8)