Strain Name:

BXSB.129S2(Cg)-Cxcr5tm1Lipp/DcrJ

Stock Number:

021874

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Availability:

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Estimated Available for Distribution Date: 10-NOV-14
Use Restrictions Apply, see Terms of Use
Common Names: BXSB.Cxcr5-/-;     BXSB.Yaa Cxcr5-/-;    
CXCR5-deficient BXSB.Yaa mice (BXSB.Cxcr5-/- or BXSB.Yaa Cxcr5-/-) are a BXSB-congenic strain carrying a null mutation of the chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 5 gene. The chemokine receptor-deficiency of BXSB.Cxcr5-/- mice significantly delays manifestation of the spontaneous lupus-like autoimmune syndrome observed for BXSB/MpJ inbred mice. These BXSB.Cxcr5-/- mice may be useful in studying the function of T-follicular helper (Tfh) cells in B-cell affinity maturation, class switch recombination, and plasma and memory B-cell generation within the germinal center, as well as their role in autoimmune disease.

Description

Strain Information

Type Congenic; Mutant Strain; Targeted Mutation;
Additional information on Genetically Engineered and Mutant Mice.
Visit our online Nomenclature tutorial.
Additional information on Congenic nomenclature.
Mating SystemHeterozygote x Heterozygote         (Female x Male)   12-FEB-14
Specieslaboratory mouse
 
Donating InvestigatorDr. Derry Roopenian,   The Jackson Laboratory

Description
CXCR5-deficient BXSB.Yaa mice (BXSB.Cxcr5-/- or BXSB.Yaa Cxcr5-/-) are a BXSB-congenic strain carrying a null mutation of the chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 5 gene. Endogenous expression of the CXCR5 chemokine receptor on activated T cells facilitates its own maturation into T-follicular helper (Tfh) cells, as well as B cell commitment in the germinal center.

BXSB/MpJ inbred males (Stock No. 000740) develop a spontaneous lupus-like autoimmune syndrome: mortality starts at ~13 weeks of age with 50% lethality by ~30 weeks and 76% lethality by ~40 weeks. BXSB/MpJ inbred females develop a greatly attenuated form of autoimmune disease because they lack Yaa.

Homozygous (Cxcr5-/-) mice are viable and fertile. Compared to BXSB/MpJ, the chemokine receptor-deficiency of BXSB.Cxcr5-/- mice significantly delays manifestation of the autoimmune phenotype in both males and females. Specifically, mortality in males starts at ~16 weeks of age with 67% still alive at ~40 weeks of age.

Heterozygous males (BXSB.Cxcr5+/-) develop the BXSB/MpJ autoimmune phenotype. Heterozygous females develop a greatly attenuated form of autoimmune disease because they lack Yaa.

In an attempt to offer alleles on well-characterized or multiple genetic backgrounds, alleles are frequently moved to a genetic background different from that on which an allele was first characterized. It should be noted that the phenotype of BXSB.Cxcr5-/- mice could vary from that originally described for CXCR5-deficiency on other genetic backgrounds. We will modify the strain description if necessary as published results become available. C57BL/6J-congenic mice harboring this CXCR5 null allele are described and available from The Jackson Laboratory Repository as Stock No. 006659. C57BL/6J-congenic homozygous mice exhibit a complex pattern of lymph node developmental defects (e.g. deficient in inguinal, iliac and parathymic lymph nodes). CXCR5-deficient mice show a completely disorganized splenic microarchitecture, lacking segregated T- and B-cell areas within the splenic white pulp.

Development
The CXCR5 null allele (Cxcr5tm1Lipp) was designed by Dr. Martin Lipp (Max-Delbruck-Center for Molecular Medicine) to replace the 350 bp coding region of exon 2 of the chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 5 gene on chromosome 9 with a neomycin resistance cassette. C57BL/6J-congenic mice harboring this CXCR5 null allele are described and available from The Jackson Laboratory Repository as Stock No. 006659.
Dr. Derry C. Roopenian (The Jackson Laboratory) obtained some of these mutant mice and backcrossed them with BXSB/MpJ inbred mice (Stock No. 000740) for 11 generations, and then maintained the colony by breeding homozygous mice together. In 2013, Dr. Roopenian sent some BXSB.Cxcr5-/- mice at generation N11F7 to The Jackson Laboratory Repository (Autoimmune Resource) to establish Stock No. 021874. Male mice have the BXSB/MpJ-derived Y chromosome that contains the Y-linked autoimmune accelerator locus (Yaa).

Control Information

  Control
   000740 BXSB/MpJ
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls

Related Strains

View Autoimmune Resource     (13 strains)

View BXSB Strain     (13 strains)

View Y Chromosomal Aberrations     (17 strains)

Strains carrying   Cxcr5tm1Lipp allele
006659   B6.129S2(Cg)-Cxcr5tm1Lipp/J
View Strains carrying   Cxcr5tm1Lipp     (1 strain)

Phenotype

Phenotype Information

View Mammalian Phenotype Terms

Mammalian Phenotype Terms provided by MGI
      assigned by genotype

The following phenotype information is associated with a similar, but not exact match to this JAX® Mice strain.

Cxcr5tm1Lipp/Cxcr5tm1Lipp

        involves: 129S2/SvPas * CD-1
  • immune system phenotype
  • abnormal Peyer's patch morphology
    • ~30% (26 of 76) of homozygotes exhibit 1-4 small and rudimentary structures resembling Peyer's patches   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
    • ~16% (12 of 76) of homozygotes exhibit normally sized Peyer's patches with multiple B and T cell-rich zones instead of the large follicles present in wild-type mice   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
    • absent Peyer's patches
      • 55% (42 of 76) of homozygotes show complete absence of Peyer's patches   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
  • abnormal leukocyte migration
    • homozygotes exhibit a severely impaired lymphocyte migration to the Peyer's pathces and the B cell follicles of the spleen, resulting in morphologically abnormal primary lymphoid follicles   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
    • activated B cells fail to migrate from the T cell-rich zone into B cell follicles of the spleen   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
  • abnormal spleen primary B follicle morphology
    • at 8 wks of age, homozygotes display defective formation of primary splenic follicles, including: the T cell zone is located centrally but not polarized in the follicle; the T cell zone is completely surrounded by a small rim of B cell-expressing IgD but not IgM (i.e. IgM+IgD+ subset is absent); a prominent marginal zone surrounds the follicle completely   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
  • abnormal spleen secondary B follicle morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
    • absent spleen germinal center
      • despite high numbers of germinal center founder cells, no functional germinal centers develop in mutant spleen after immunization with the T cell-dependent antigen DNP-KHL   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
  • absent axillary lymph nodes   (MGI Ref ID J:78282)
  • absent brachial lymph nodes   (MGI Ref ID J:78282)
  • absent cervical lymph nodes   (MGI Ref ID J:78282)
  • absent follicular dendritic cells
    • absence of primary follicular dendritic cells   (MGI Ref ID J:78282)
  • absent inguinal lymph nodes   (MGI Ref ID J:78282)
    • homozygotes lack inguinal lymph nodes   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
  • absent lymph nodes
    • absence of inguinal, iliac/periaortic, axillary, branchial, deep cervical, sacral/caudal, and parathymic lymph nodes   (MGI Ref ID J:78282)
  • increased B cell number
    • homozygotes display a 2- to 4-fold increase in spleen or peripheral blood cells co-expressing B220 and high amounts fo IgM   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
  • hematopoietic system phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte migration
    • homozygotes exhibit a severely impaired lymphocyte migration to the Peyer's pathces and the B cell follicles of the spleen, resulting in morphologically abnormal primary lymphoid follicles   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
    • activated B cells fail to migrate from the T cell-rich zone into B cell follicles of the spleen   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
  • abnormal spleen primary B follicle morphology
    • at 8 wks of age, homozygotes display defective formation of primary splenic follicles, including: the T cell zone is located centrally but not polarized in the follicle; the T cell zone is completely surrounded by a small rim of B cell-expressing IgD but not IgM (i.e. IgM+IgD+ subset is absent); a prominent marginal zone surrounds the follicle completely   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
  • abnormal spleen secondary B follicle morphology   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
    • absent spleen germinal center
      • despite high numbers of germinal center founder cells, no functional germinal centers develop in mutant spleen after immunization with the T cell-dependent antigen DNP-KHL   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
  • increased B cell number
    • homozygotes display a 2- to 4-fold increase in spleen or peripheral blood cells co-expressing B220 and high amounts fo IgM   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
  • cellular phenotype
  • abnormal leukocyte migration
    • homozygotes exhibit a severely impaired lymphocyte migration to the Peyer's pathces and the B cell follicles of the spleen, resulting in morphologically abnormal primary lymphoid follicles   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
    • activated B cells fail to migrate from the T cell-rich zone into B cell follicles of the spleen   (MGI Ref ID J:37126)
View Research Applications

Research Applications
This mouse can be used to support research in many areas including:

Cell Biology Research
Signal Transduction

Hematological Research
Immunological Defects
      B and T cell deficiency

Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
Autoimmunity
      B and T cell deficiency
      B cell deficiency
      lupus erythematosus
      lupus erythematosus, control
Growth Factors/Receptors/Cytokines
Immunodeficiency
      B and T cell deficiency
      B cell defects
      B cell deficiency
      T cell deficiency
      defects in humoral immune responses
      multiple immune defects
      specific T cell deficiency
Inflammation
      B and T cell deficiency
Intracellular Signaling Molecules
Lymphoid Tissue Defects
      B and T cell deficiency
      Lymphocyte Homing

Internal/Organ Research
Lymphoid Tissue Defects
      B and T cell deficiency
      T cell deficiency
Thymus Defects
      B and T cell deficient

Research Tools
Genetics Research
      Tissue/Cell Markers: T cell specific surface marker
Immunology, Inflammation and Autoimmunity Research
      B and T cell deficiency
      B cell deficiency
      T cell deficiency
      T cell deficiency, xenograft/transplant host
      T cell specific surface marker
      genes regulating susceptibility to infectious disease and endotoxin
      production of B cells and antibodies
      specific T cell deficiency
Toxicology Research
      B and T cell deficiency, xenograft transplant host

Virology Research
B and T Cell Deficiency

Genes & Alleles

Gene & Allele Information provided by MGI

 
Allele Symbol Cxcr5tm1Lipp
Allele Name targeted mutation 1, Martin Lipp
Allele Type Targeted (Null/Knockout)
Common Name(s) Blr1-; CXCR5-;
Mutation Made By Martin Lipp,   Max-Delbrueck-Center
Strain of Origin129S2/SvPas
ES Cell Line NameD3
ES Cell Line Strain129S2/SvPas
Gene Symbol and Name Cxcr5, chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 5
Chromosome 9
Gene Common Name(s) BLR1; Blr1; Burkitt lymphoma receptor 1; CD185; CXCR-5; G-protein coupled receptor 6; Gpcr6; MDR15; NLR;
Molecular Note A neomycin selection cassette was inserted into exon 2. Northern blot analysis on RNA derived from spleen cells of homozygous mice demonstrated that no detectable transcipt was produced from this allele (data not shown), and flow cytometry experiments on leukocytes derived from homozygous mice demonstrated that no detectable protein was produced. [MGI Ref ID J:37126]

Genotyping

Genotyping Information

Genotyping Protocols

Cxcr5tm1Lipp, Standard PCR


Helpful Links

Genotyping resources and troubleshooting

References

References provided by MGI

Additional References

Cxcr5tm1Lipp related

Achtman AH; Hopken UE; Bernert C; Lipp M. 2009. CCR7-deficient mice develop atypically persistent germinal centers in response to thymus-independent type 2 antigens. J Leukoc Biol 85(3):409-17. [PubMed: 19074554]  [MGI Ref ID J:146058]

Ansel KM; Ngo VN; Hyman PL; Luther SA; Forster R; Sedgwick JD; Browning JL; Lipp M; Cyster JG. 2000. A chemokine-driven positive feedback loop organizes lymphoid follicles. Nature 406(6793):309-14. [PubMed: 10917533]  [MGI Ref ID J:78282]

Arnold CN; Campbell DJ; Lipp M; Butcher EC. 2007. The germinal center response is impaired in the absence of T cell-expressed CXCR5. Eur J Immunol 37(1):100-9. [PubMed: 17171760]  [MGI Ref ID J:117042]

Berberich S; Forster R; Pabst O. 2007. The peritoneal micromilieu commits B cells to home to body cavities and the small intestine. Blood 109(11):4627-34. [PubMed: 17289810]  [MGI Ref ID J:145438]

Chung Y; Tanaka S; Chu F; Nurieva RI; Martinez GJ; Rawal S; Wang YH; Lim H; Reynolds JM; Zhou XH; Fan HM; Liu ZM; Neelapu SS; Dong C. 2011. Follicular regulatory T cells expressing Foxp3 and Bcl-6 suppress germinal center reactions. Nat Med 17(8):983-8. [PubMed: 21785430]  [MGI Ref ID J:174509]

Cinamon G; Zachariah MA; Lam OM; Foss FW Jr; Cyster JG. 2008. Follicular shuttling of marginal zone B cells facilitates antigen transport. Nat Immunol 9(1):54-62. [PubMed: 18037889]  [MGI Ref ID J:130200]

Coelho FM; Natale D; Soriano SF; Hons M; Swoger J; Mayer J; Danuser R; Scandella E; Pieczyk M; Zerwes HG; Junt T; Sailer AW; Ludewig B; Sharpe J; Figge MT; Stein JV. 2013. Naive B-cell trafficking is shaped by local chemokine availability and LFA-1-independent stromal interactions. Blood 121(20):4101-9. [PubMed: 23558016]  [MGI Ref ID J:198194]

Ekland EH; Forster R; Lipp M; Cyster JG. 2004. Requirements for follicular exclusion and competitive elimination of autoantigen-binding B cells. J Immunol 172(8):4700-8. [PubMed: 15067045]  [MGI Ref ID J:89130]

Finke D; Acha-Orbea H; Mattis A; Lipp M; Kraehenbuhl J. 2002. CD4+CD3- cells induce Peyer's patch development: role of alpha4beta1 integrin activation by CXCR5. Immunity 17(3):363-73. [PubMed: 12354388]  [MGI Ref ID J:111436]

Fleige H; Ravens S; Moschovakis GL; Bolter J; Willenzon S; Sutter G; Haussler S; Kalinke U; Prinz I; Forster R. 2014. IL-17-induced CXCL12 recruits B cells and induces follicle formation in BALT in the absence of differentiated FDCs. J Exp Med 211(4):643-51. [PubMed: 24663215]  [MGI Ref ID J:211677]

Flynn R; Du J; Veenstra RG; Reichenbach DK; Panoskaltsis-Mortari A; Taylor PA; Freeman GJ; Serody JS; Murphy WJ; Munn DH; Sarantopoulos S; Luznik L; Maillard I; Koreth J; Cutler C; Soiffer RJ; Antin JH; Ritz J; Dubovsky JA; Byrd JC; MacDonald KP; Hill GR; Blazar BR. 2014. Increased T follicular helper cells and germinal center B cells are required for cGVHD and bronchiolitis obliterans. Blood 123(25):3988-98. [PubMed: 24820310]  [MGI Ref ID J:211276]

Forster R; Mattis AE; Kremmer E; Wolf E; Brem G; Lipp M. 1996. A putative chemokine receptor, BLR1, directs B cell migration to defined lymphoid organs and specific anatomic compartments of the spleen. Cell 87(6):1037-47. [PubMed: 8978608]  [MGI Ref ID J:37126]

Grigorova IL; Panteleev M; Cyster JG. 2010. Lymph node cortical sinus organization and relationship to lymphocyte egress dynamics and antigen exposure. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107(47):20447-52. [PubMed: 21059923]  [MGI Ref ID J:166592]

Hardtke S; Ohl L; Forster R. 2005. Balanced expression of CXCR5 and CCR7 on follicular T helper cells determines their transient positioning to lymph node follicles and is essential for efficient B-cell help. Blood 106(6):1924-31. [PubMed: 15899919]  [MGI Ref ID J:118864]

Haynes NM; Allen CD; Lesley R; Ansel KM; Killeen N; Cyster JG. 2007. Role of CXCR5 and CCR7 in follicular Th cell positioning and appearance of a programmed cell death gene-1high germinal center-associated subpopulation. J Immunol 179(8):5099-108. [PubMed: 17911595]  [MGI Ref ID J:153037]

Hopken UE; Achtman AH; Kruger K; Lipp M. 2004. Distinct and overlapping roles of CXCR5 and CCR7 in B-1 cell homing and early immunity against bacterial pathogens. J Leukoc Biol 76(3):709-18. [PubMed: 15197239]  [MGI Ref ID J:91988]

Hopken UE; Wengner AM; Loddenkemper C; Stein H; Heimesaat MM; Rehm A; Lipp M. 2007. CCR7 deficiency causes ectopic lymphoid neogenesis and disturbed mucosal tissue integrity. Blood 109(3):886-95. [PubMed: 17018859]  [MGI Ref ID J:144390]

Hopken UE; Winter S; Achtman AH; Kruger K; Lipp M. 2010. CCR7 regulates lymphocyte egress and recirculation through body cavities. J Leukoc Biol 87(4):671-82. [PubMed: 20028772]  [MGI Ref ID J:158854]

Itakura A; Szczepanik M; Campos RA; Paliwal V; Majewska M; Matsuda H; Takatsu K; Askenase PW. 2005. An hour after immunization peritoneal B-1 cells are activated to migrate to lymphoid organs where within 1 day they produce IgM antibodies that initiate elicitation of contact sensitivity. J Immunol 175(11):7170-8. [PubMed: 16301620]  [MGI Ref ID J:122149]

Jiang J; Karimi O; Ouburg S; Champion CI; Khurana A; Liu G; Freed A; Pleijster J; Rozengurt N; Land JA; Surcel HM; Tiitinen A; Paavonen J; Kronenberg M; Morre SA; Kelly KA. 2012. Interruption of CXCL13-CXCR5 axis increases upper genital tract pathology and activation of NKT cells following chlamydial genital infection. PLoS One 7(11):e47487. [PubMed: 23189125]  [MGI Ref ID J:195007]

Johnston B; Kim CH; Soler D; Emoto M; Butcher EC. 2003. Differential chemokine responses and homing patterns of murine TCR alpha beta NKT cell subsets. J Immunol 171(6):2960-9. [PubMed: 12960320]  [MGI Ref ID J:120380]

Junt T; Fink K; Forster R; Senn B; Lipp M; Muramatsu M; Zinkernagel RM; Ludewig B; Hengartner H. 2005. CXCR5-dependent seeding of follicular niches by B and Th cells augments antiviral B cell responses. J Immunol 175(11):7109-16. [PubMed: 16301613]  [MGI Ref ID J:122199]

Kelly LM; Pereira JP; Yi T; Xu Y; Cyster JG. 2011. EBI2 guides serial movements of activated B cells and ligand activity is detectable in lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues. J Immunol 187(6):3026-32. [PubMed: 21844396]  [MGI Ref ID J:179238]

Krege J; Seth S; Hardtke S; Davalos-Misslitz AC; Forster R. 2009. Antigen-dependent rescue of nose-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) development independent of LTbetaR and CXCR5 signaling. Eur J Immunol 39(10):2765-78. [PubMed: 19757439]  [MGI Ref ID J:153505]

Luther SA; Ansel KM; Cyster JG. 2003. Overlapping roles of CXCL13, interleukin 7 receptor alpha, and CCR7 ligands in lymph node development. J Exp Med 197(9):1191-8. [PubMed: 12732660]  [MGI Ref ID J:83288]

Meier D; Bornmann C; Chappaz S; Schmutz S; Otten LA; Ceredig R; Acha-Orbea H; Finke D. 2007. Ectopic lymphoid-organ development occurs through interleukin 7-mediated enhanced survival of lymphoid-tissue-inducer cells. Immunity 26(5):643-54. [PubMed: 17521585]  [MGI Ref ID J:123554]

Ohl L; Henning G; Krautwald S; Lipp M; Hardtke S; Bernhardt G; Pabst O; Forster R. 2003. Cooperating mechanisms of CXCR5 and CCR7 in development and organization of secondary lymphoid organs. J Exp Med 197(9):1199-204. [PubMed: 12732661]  [MGI Ref ID J:83287]

Paradis M; Mindt BC; Duerr CU; Rojas OL; Ng D; Boulianne B; McCarthy DD; Yu MD; Summers deLuca LE; Ward LA; Waldron JB; Philpott DJ; Gommerman JL; Fritz JH. 2014. A TNF-alpha-CCL20-CCR6 axis regulates Nod1-induced B cell responses. J Immunol 192(6):2787-99. [PubMed: 24534531]  [MGI Ref ID J:209901]

Prinz M; Heikenwalder M; Junt T; Schwarz P; Glatzel M; Heppner FL; Fu YX; Lipp M; Aguzzi A. 2003. Positioning of follicular dendritic cells within the spleen controls prion neuroinvasion. Nature 425(6961):957-62. [PubMed: 14562059]  [MGI Ref ID J:86291]

Publicover J; Gaggar A; Nishimura S; Van Horn CM; Goodsell A; Muench MO; Reinhardt RL; van Rooijen N; Wakil AE; Peters M; Cyster JG; Erle DJ; Rosenthal P; Cooper S; Baron JL. 2013. Age-dependent hepatic lymphoid organization directs successful immunity to hepatitis B. J Clin Invest 123(9):3728-39. [PubMed: 23925290]  [MGI Ref ID J:201620]

Reif K; Okkenhaug K; Sasaki T; Penninger JM; Vanhaesebroeck B; Cyster JG. 2004. Cutting edge: differential roles for phosphoinositide 3-kinases, p110gamma and p110delta, in lymphocyte chemotaxis and homing. J Immunol 173(4):2236-40. [PubMed: 15294934]  [MGI Ref ID J:92733]

Richter K; Oxenius A. 2013. Non-neutralizing antibodies protect from chronic LCMV infection independently of activating FcgammaR or complement. Eur J Immunol 43(9):2349-60. [PubMed: 23749374]  [MGI Ref ID J:201331]

Saez de Guinoa J; Barrio L; Mellado M; Carrasco YR. 2011. CXCL13/CXCR5 signaling enhances BCR-triggered B-cell activation by shaping cell dynamics. Blood 118(6):1560-9. [PubMed: 21659539]  [MGI Ref ID J:176933]

Schmidt TH; Bannard O; Gray EE; Cyster JG. 2013. CXCR4 promotes B cell egress from Peyer's patches. J Exp Med 210(6):1099-107. [PubMed: 23669394]  [MGI Ref ID J:200954]

Schmutz S; Bosco N; Chappaz S; Boyman O; Acha-Orbea H; Ceredig R; Rolink AG; Finke D. 2009. Cutting edge: IL-7 regulates the peripheral pool of adult RORgamma+ lymphoid tissue inducer cells. J Immunol 183(4):2217-21. [PubMed: 19635901]  [MGI Ref ID J:151481]

Slight SR; Rangel-Moreno J; Gopal R; Lin Y; Fallert Junecko BA; Mehra S; Selman M; Becerril-Villanueva E; Baquera-Heredia J; Pavon L; Kaushal D; Reinhart TA; Randall TD; Khader SA. 2013. CXCR5+ T helper cells mediate protective immunity against tuberculosis. J Clin Invest :. [PubMed: 23281399]  [MGI Ref ID J:194502]

Velaga S; Herbrand H; Friedrichsen M; Jiong T; Dorsch M; Hoffmann MW; Forster R; Pabst O. 2009. Chemokine receptor CXCR5 supports solitary intestinal lymphoid tissue formation, B cell homing, and induction of intestinal IgA responses. J Immunol 182(5):2610-9. [PubMed: 19234155]  [MGI Ref ID J:146265]

Victoratos P; Kollias G. 2009. Induction of autoantibody-mediated spontaneous arthritis critically depends on follicular dendritic cells. Immunity 30(1):130-42. [PubMed: 19119026]  [MGI Ref ID J:143728]

Voigt I; Camacho SA; de Boer BA; Lipp M; Forster R; Berek C. 2000. CXCR5-deficient mice develop functional germinal centers in the splenic T cell zone. Eur J Immunol 30(2):560-7. [PubMed: 10671212]  [MGI Ref ID J:60376]

Waehre A; Halvorsen B; Yndestad A; Husberg C; Sjaastad I; Nygard S; Dahl CP; Ahmed MS; Finsen AV; Reims H; Louch WE; Hilfiker-Kleiner D; Vinge LE; Roald B; Attramadal H; Lipp M; Gullestad L; Aukrust P; Christensen G. 2011. Lack of Chemokine Signaling through CXCR5 Causes Increased Mortality, Ventricular Dilatation and Deranged Matrix during Cardiac Pressure Overload. PLoS One 6(4):e18668. [PubMed: 21533157]  [MGI Ref ID J:172390]

Wollenberg I; Agua-Doce A; Hernandez A; Almeida C; Oliveira VG; Faro J; Graca L. 2011. Regulation of the germinal center reaction by Foxp3+ follicular regulatory T cells. J Immunol 187(9):4553-60. [PubMed: 21984700]  [MGI Ref ID J:179644]

van de Pavert SA; Olivier BJ; Goverse G; Vondenhoff MF; Greuter M; Beke P; Kusser K; Hopken UE; Lipp M; Niederreither K; Blomhoff R; Sitnik K; Agace WW; Randall TD; de Jonge WJ; Mebius RE. 2009. Chemokine CXCL13 is essential for lymph node initiation and is induced by retinoic acid and neuronal stimulation. Nat Immunol 10(11):1193-9. [PubMed: 19783990]  [MGI Ref ID J:157747]

Health & husbandry

Health & Colony Maintenance Information

Colony Maintenance

Breeding & HusbandryTo maintain the live colony, homozygous mice may be bred together. Homozygous animals of both sexes have delayed onset of the spontaneous lupus-like autoimmune syndrome observed for BXSB/MpJ inbred mice (Stock No. 000740). Specifically, BXSB.Cxcr5-/- males have only 33% lethality at ~40 weeks of age. Homozygous females develop a greatly attenuated form of autoimmune disease because they lack Yaa. Heterozygotes will develop the sex-specific autoimmune phenotype of BXSB/MpJ. The expected coat color is white-bellied agouti.
Mating SystemHeterozygote x Heterozygote         (Female x Male)   12-FEB-14

Pricing and Purchasing

Pricing, Supply Level & Notes, Controls


 

This strain is currently Under Development - Now Accepting Orders.
Estimated Available for Distribution Date: 10-NOV-14

Please note: You may now place orders for this strain although it is not yet ready for distribution. Estimated available for distribution dates are provided to keep customers better informed on strains under development. Please note that our Colony Managers routinely monitor the target date and edit it based on breeding performance and other factors. The length of time it takes to make a new strain available for distribution depends on genotype, age, number of animals sent by the Donating Investigator, breeding performance, additional strain development (backcrossing, making homozygous), and anticipated demand for the strain.

Pricing for USA, Canada and Mexico shipping destinations View International Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $232.00Female or MaleHeterozygous for Cxcr5tm1Lipp  
$232.00Female or MaleHomozygous for Cxcr5tm1Lipp  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$464.00Heterozygous for Cxcr5tm1Lipp x Heterozygous for Cxcr5tm1Lipp  

Standard Supply

Under Development - Now Accepting Orders The strain development process (i.e. importation, rederivation, and colony expansion) usually takes six to nine months.

Pricing for International shipping destinations View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing

Live Mice

Price per mouse (US dollars $)GenderGenotypes Provided
Individual Mouse $301.60Female or MaleHeterozygous for Cxcr5tm1Lipp  
$301.60Female or MaleHomozygous for Cxcr5tm1Lipp  
Price per Pair (US dollars $)Pair Genotype
$603.20Heterozygous for Cxcr5tm1Lipp x Heterozygous for Cxcr5tm1Lipp  

Standard Supply

Under Development - Now Accepting Orders The strain development process (i.e. importation, rederivation, and colony expansion) usually takes six to nine months.

View USA Canada and Mexico Pricing View International Pricing

Standard Supply

Under Development - Now Accepting Orders The strain development process (i.e. importation, rederivation, and colony expansion) usually takes six to nine months.

Control Information

  Control
   000740 BXSB/MpJ
 
  Considerations for Choosing Controls
  Control Pricing Information for Genetically Engineered Mutant Strains.
 

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See Terms of Use tab for General Terms and Conditions


The Jackson Laboratory's Genotype Promise

The Jackson Laboratory has rigorous genetic quality control and mutant gene genotyping programs to ensure the genetic background of JAX® Mice strains as well as the genotypes of strains with identified molecular mutations. JAX® Mice strains are only made available to researchers after meeting our standards. However, the phenotype of each strain may not be fully characterized and/or captured in the strain data sheets. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a strain's phenotype will meet all expectations. To ensure that JAX® Mice will meet the needs of individual research projects or when requesting a strain that is new to your research, we suggest ordering and performing tests on a small number of mice to determine suitability for your particular project.
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Terms of Use

Terms of Use


General Terms and Conditions


For Licensing and Use Restrictions view the link(s) below:
- Use of MICE by companies or for-profit entities requires a license prior to shipping.

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phone:207-288-6470

JAX® Mice, Products & Services Conditions of Use

"MICE" means mouse strains, their progeny derived by inbreeding or crossbreeding, unmodified derivatives from mouse strains or their progeny supplied by The Jackson Laboratory ("JACKSON"). "PRODUCTS" means biological materials supplied by JACKSON, and their derivatives. "RECIPIENT" means each recipient of MICE, PRODUCTS, or services provided by JACKSON including each institution, its employees and other researchers under its control. MICE or PRODUCTS shall not be: (i) used for any purpose other than the internal research, (ii) sold or otherwise provided to any third party for any use, or (iii) provided to any agent or other third party to provide breeding or other services. Acceptance of MICE or PRODUCTS from JACKSON shall be deemed as agreement by RECIPIENT to these conditions, and departure from these conditions requires JACKSON's prior written authorization.

No Warranty

MICE, PRODUCTS AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”. JACKSON EXTENDS NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO MICE, PRODUCTS OR SERVICES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In case of dissatisfaction for a valid reason and claimed in writing by a purchaser within ninety (90) days of receipt of mice, products or services, JACKSON will, at its option, provide credit or replacement for the mice or product received or the services provided.

No Liability

In no event shall JACKSON, its trustees, directors, officers, employees, and affiliates be liable for any causes of action or damages, including any direct, indirect, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the provision of MICE, PRODUCTS or services, including economic damage or injury to property and lost profits, and including any damage arising from acts or negligence on the part of JACKSON, its agents or employees. Unless prohibited by law, in purchasing or receiving MICE, PRODUCTS or services from JACKSON, purchaser or recipient, or any party claiming by or through them, expressly releases and discharges JACKSON from all such causes of action or damages, and further agrees to defend and indemnify JACKSON from any costs or damages arising out of any third party claims.

MICE and PRODUCTS are to be used in a safe manner and in accordance with all applicable governmental rules and regulations.

The foregoing represents the General Terms and Conditions applicable to JACKSON’s MICE, PRODUCTS or services. In addition, special terms and conditions of sale of certain MICE, PRODUCTS or services may be set forth separately in JACKSON web pages, catalogs, price lists, contracts, and/or other documents, and these special terms and conditions shall also govern the sale of these MICE, PRODUCTS and services by JACKSON, and by its licensees and distributors.

Acceptance of delivery of MICE, PRODUCTS or services shall be deemed agreement to these terms and conditions. No purchase order or other document transmitted by purchaser or recipient that may modify the terms and conditions hereof, shall be in any way binding on JACKSON, and instead the terms and conditions set forth herein, including any special terms and conditions set forth separately, shall govern the sale of MICE, PRODUCTS or services by JACKSON.


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